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271 blogs
  • 23 May 2019
    Charitable causes across Wales have now raised over £500,000 in funding through Localgiving. Localgiving’s Wales Development Programme has been running since July 2016. In this time over 350 charities and community groups have received a year of free fundraising support. Through the programme groups can access face-to-face training wherever they are based, Gift Aid and access to Localgiving’s incentivised giving campaigns. Each group is given £200 match funding, making it as easy as possible for them to launch their fundraising, as online donations are doubled until this is used up. The Wales members cover all 22 counties and range from tiny local groups run by volunteers to charities with staff operating across a larger area or county. Lauren Swain, Localgiving’s Wales Development Manager, runs the programme. There are 7 free places left on the programme, as it is now almost fully subscribed 8 months ahead of target. After 34 months of the programme, Localgiving has already helped groups to raise over £500,000 and provided 255 1:1 training sessions. In a recent funder report, 87% of members have seen a positive impact on their fundraising and 89% are more confident with online fundraising. The programme has vitally filled a gap in Wales, as 94% of groups previously had no access to online fundraising training and support locally. Localgiving has worked closely with the WCVA and the 19 CVCs to reach groups across every area. The CVCs have been brilliant in promoting the opportunity and hosting the 75 workshops that Localgiving has run for 485 across every county in Wales. The programme is funded by National Lottery Community Fund and Garfield Weston Foundation – we are very excited at how much amazing impact their support has had!   These are some of our Wales members and how they feel about the programme: Paul Popham Fund have been members of Localgiving since October 2016 and have raised over £14,500 from 445 donations, including £425 of match funding. The Bridge Mentoring Plus Scheme have been members of Localgiving since August 2016 and have raised over £6100, including £720 of match funding. Colwyn Victoria Pier Trust have been members of Localgiving since June 2017 and have raised over £2100 from 74 donations, including £610 of match funding.    
  • Charitable causes across Wales have now raised over £500,000 in funding through Localgiving. Localgiving’s Wales Development Programme has been running since July 2016. In this time over 350 charities and community groups have received a year of free fundraising support. Through the programme groups can access face-to-face training wherever they are based, Gift Aid and access to Localgiving’s incentivised giving campaigns. Each group is given £200 match funding, making it as easy as possible for them to launch their fundraising, as online donations are doubled until this is used up. The Wales members cover all 22 counties and range from tiny local groups run by volunteers to charities with staff operating across a larger area or county. Lauren Swain, Localgiving’s Wales Development Manager, runs the programme. There are 7 free places left on the programme, as it is now almost fully subscribed 8 months ahead of target. After 34 months of the programme, Localgiving has already helped groups to raise over £500,000 and provided 255 1:1 training sessions. In a recent funder report, 87% of members have seen a positive impact on their fundraising and 89% are more confident with online fundraising. The programme has vitally filled a gap in Wales, as 94% of groups previously had no access to online fundraising training and support locally. Localgiving has worked closely with the WCVA and the 19 CVCs to reach groups across every area. The CVCs have been brilliant in promoting the opportunity and hosting the 75 workshops that Localgiving has run for 485 across every county in Wales. The programme is funded by National Lottery Community Fund and Garfield Weston Foundation – we are very excited at how much amazing impact their support has had!   These are some of our Wales members and how they feel about the programme: Paul Popham Fund have been members of Localgiving since October 2016 and have raised over £14,500 from 445 donations, including £425 of match funding. The Bridge Mentoring Plus Scheme have been members of Localgiving since August 2016 and have raised over £6100, including £720 of match funding. Colwyn Victoria Pier Trust have been members of Localgiving since June 2017 and have raised over £2100 from 74 donations, including £610 of match funding.    
    May 23, 2019 244
  • 09 Apr 2019
    An African family with two little girls under the age of 4 and a third child on the way need your help. They are fighting the threat of deportation to their home country which would put both of their little girls in danger of female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM is a ritual that takes place in some countries that involves the cutting or removal of some or all of the external female genitalia. If the family is forced to return home, there is a high risk that the local community would force the family to have FGM inflicted on the little girls. This would violate their human rights and put their physical and mental health at serious risk. If they are deported and refuse to have FGM carried out on their children, they will be ostracised from their communities and the girls will face stigma and difficulties to marry and integrate later in life.  The family applied for asylum in the UK in the search for a safer future but their case has been refused, and their situation has been unresolved since 2014. Since then, the family have remained in limbo, living in destitution and the threat of deportation has resulted in anxiety and poor mental health for the family. We need to raise a total of £1,500 to cover the solicitor and barrister fees involved with the appeal. These fees have been lowered at the discretion of the solicitor, as he has been working with the family for some time now and he sympathises with their case. The family have lived in the UK for 17 years now and have made it their home. Their little girls were born in England and also see it as their home - they do not know any other country or culture. The family has integrated into British culture, become a part of the local parish and are valued members of the Borderlands community. The parents volunteer in their spare time, including at the local farm which benefits local agriculture and food production in Bristol. This young family needs your support to ensure they can continue their lives here and to keep their children safe from this highly dangerous, damaging and traumatic procedure. April Humble is Director of Borderlands, a charity working with refugees and asylum seekers in Bristol, and has been working in the field internationally for 10 years. Donate Now
    1292 Posted by April Humble
  • An African family with two little girls under the age of 4 and a third child on the way need your help. They are fighting the threat of deportation to their home country which would put both of their little girls in danger of female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM is a ritual that takes place in some countries that involves the cutting or removal of some or all of the external female genitalia. If the family is forced to return home, there is a high risk that the local community would force the family to have FGM inflicted on the little girls. This would violate their human rights and put their physical and mental health at serious risk. If they are deported and refuse to have FGM carried out on their children, they will be ostracised from their communities and the girls will face stigma and difficulties to marry and integrate later in life.  The family applied for asylum in the UK in the search for a safer future but their case has been refused, and their situation has been unresolved since 2014. Since then, the family have remained in limbo, living in destitution and the threat of deportation has resulted in anxiety and poor mental health for the family. We need to raise a total of £1,500 to cover the solicitor and barrister fees involved with the appeal. These fees have been lowered at the discretion of the solicitor, as he has been working with the family for some time now and he sympathises with their case. The family have lived in the UK for 17 years now and have made it their home. Their little girls were born in England and also see it as their home - they do not know any other country or culture. The family has integrated into British culture, become a part of the local parish and are valued members of the Borderlands community. The parents volunteer in their spare time, including at the local farm which benefits local agriculture and food production in Bristol. This young family needs your support to ensure they can continue their lives here and to keep their children safe from this highly dangerous, damaging and traumatic procedure. April Humble is Director of Borderlands, a charity working with refugees and asylum seekers in Bristol, and has been working in the field internationally for 10 years. Donate Now
    Apr 09, 2019 1292
  • 01 Apr 2019
    Hi there, I’m Simi, Junior Web Developer at Localgiving. We have been working on making improvements to our Search Interface. We’ve thought very carefully about how to improve the way our users will interact with the platform on both desktop and mobile devices.   You can now search from the home page and you will be taken straight to the new search page where you’ll immediately find the results. This will save you the time it would take to navigate to different pages. You can see all the results neatly packed in the sidebar of the page while still having a full view of the map. Your results will be split between 4 tabs located at the top of the sidebar (similar to the old search interface). From here you can navigate to the charity page or make donations directly to your charity of choice.  To get a better view of where charities are on the map you can use the orange arrow button by the side of the sidebar to toggle the search results siderbar open and close. Results can be narrowed down by area and causes using the filters tab. We always want to provide our users with the best experience on Localgiving. We are therefore looking forward to getting feedback from you so that we can continue to improve the site!   
    1504 Posted by Simisola Adejumo
  • Hi there, I’m Simi, Junior Web Developer at Localgiving. We have been working on making improvements to our Search Interface. We’ve thought very carefully about how to improve the way our users will interact with the platform on both desktop and mobile devices.   You can now search from the home page and you will be taken straight to the new search page where you’ll immediately find the results. This will save you the time it would take to navigate to different pages. You can see all the results neatly packed in the sidebar of the page while still having a full view of the map. Your results will be split between 4 tabs located at the top of the sidebar (similar to the old search interface). From here you can navigate to the charity page or make donations directly to your charity of choice.  To get a better view of where charities are on the map you can use the orange arrow button by the side of the sidebar to toggle the search results siderbar open and close. Results can be narrowed down by area and causes using the filters tab. We always want to provide our users with the best experience on Localgiving. We are therefore looking forward to getting feedback from you so that we can continue to improve the site!   
    Apr 01, 2019 1504
  • 27 Mar 2019
    When I started my career as a fundraiser 30 years ago, many of the things we now take for granted did not exist.  We did not have the internet, mobile phones, smart phones, e-mail or social media. A shared computer sat, neglected in the corner of the office as we struggled to use its counter-intuitive software and retreated to the familiarity of our desks, telephones, Rolodex, pens and paper.  I was a Community Fundraiser.  We had the best jobs in fundraising.  We could not compete with the glamour of the High Level Donor teams, or the prestige of the slick, suited Corporate Fundraisers. But we didn’t care because in our hearts we knew that we practiced the art of building relationships in all their human, unpredictable, chaotic, grassroots glory.  The community was the place to be. Then, one day my boss arrived and with great fanfare installed something called Windows. From that moment, the world changed quickly.  We saw unprecedented mass marketing and data crunching. Words like acquisition, retention, attrition and segmentation became part of our fundraising vocabulary. The rise of the database meant that big charities cultivated direct marketing teams who mapped out donor journeys and, in turn generated work for a vast number of creative agencies and fulfilment houses. In the mid-1990s we could feel the tectonic plates of fundraising shift.  In the big-charity world community fundraising became the poor and noisy relation of teams that delivered a better, faster, more clinical return on investment.  Technology meant that significant funds could be generated quickly at arm’s length. Suddenly there was no need to get down into the messy grassroots, or engage with challenging, complex, emotional people. Since then I have worked my way up through the fundraising ranks, to middle manager, Department Head and Director of Fundraising.  I’m no luddite, but there have been times during my career that I have hankered after the days when fundraising was about communities, not segments. When we valued the quality of relationship above the in-year return on investment. To my delight I feel the tectonic plates shifting once more. I see global and local hashtag communities coming together to demonstrate, march and fundraise in all their messy, noisy glory.  I see the arm’s length direct marketing one-way traffic slowed by legislation, regulation and reputation.  And I see emotional and passionate people and communities back at the heart of fundraising and activism. Ironically technology has helped us to come full circle and given a voice to communities once again.  There was a point when I thought that technology would kill off Community Fundraising. But now I have hope, because they are two sides of the same coin.  So, my message to all those fantastic, entrepreneurial, innovative local charities and groups is embrace technology. Not to send one-way, direct marketing, envelopes through doors asking for £2 per month. Embrace technology to find your voice, tell your story and build your community, whether it’s on your doorstep or another continent. This is a new, reinvigorated, generation of community fundraisers.  
    1463 Posted by Leesa Harwood
  • When I started my career as a fundraiser 30 years ago, many of the things we now take for granted did not exist.  We did not have the internet, mobile phones, smart phones, e-mail or social media. A shared computer sat, neglected in the corner of the office as we struggled to use its counter-intuitive software and retreated to the familiarity of our desks, telephones, Rolodex, pens and paper.  I was a Community Fundraiser.  We had the best jobs in fundraising.  We could not compete with the glamour of the High Level Donor teams, or the prestige of the slick, suited Corporate Fundraisers. But we didn’t care because in our hearts we knew that we practiced the art of building relationships in all their human, unpredictable, chaotic, grassroots glory.  The community was the place to be. Then, one day my boss arrived and with great fanfare installed something called Windows. From that moment, the world changed quickly.  We saw unprecedented mass marketing and data crunching. Words like acquisition, retention, attrition and segmentation became part of our fundraising vocabulary. The rise of the database meant that big charities cultivated direct marketing teams who mapped out donor journeys and, in turn generated work for a vast number of creative agencies and fulfilment houses. In the mid-1990s we could feel the tectonic plates of fundraising shift.  In the big-charity world community fundraising became the poor and noisy relation of teams that delivered a better, faster, more clinical return on investment.  Technology meant that significant funds could be generated quickly at arm’s length. Suddenly there was no need to get down into the messy grassroots, or engage with challenging, complex, emotional people. Since then I have worked my way up through the fundraising ranks, to middle manager, Department Head and Director of Fundraising.  I’m no luddite, but there have been times during my career that I have hankered after the days when fundraising was about communities, not segments. When we valued the quality of relationship above the in-year return on investment. To my delight I feel the tectonic plates shifting once more. I see global and local hashtag communities coming together to demonstrate, march and fundraise in all their messy, noisy glory.  I see the arm’s length direct marketing one-way traffic slowed by legislation, regulation and reputation.  And I see emotional and passionate people and communities back at the heart of fundraising and activism. Ironically technology has helped us to come full circle and given a voice to communities once again.  There was a point when I thought that technology would kill off Community Fundraising. But now I have hope, because they are two sides of the same coin.  So, my message to all those fantastic, entrepreneurial, innovative local charities and groups is embrace technology. Not to send one-way, direct marketing, envelopes through doors asking for £2 per month. Embrace technology to find your voice, tell your story and build your community, whether it’s on your doorstep or another continent. This is a new, reinvigorated, generation of community fundraisers.  
    Mar 27, 2019 1463
  • 14 Mar 2019
    At Localgiving we like to highlight the amazing work fundraisers do for our charities and community groups. Every month I (Byron, Localgiving’s Membership Coordinator and helpline guy) pick out some some of the very best in fundraising events. Here are some of the most inspiring causes and fundraising appeals we have seen this month The 2020 TransAm Bike Race Many people say that everything is bigger in America: the cars, the food the buildings - and now apparently the bike rides. Mike is riding 4,300 miles across America. The Bradley Wiggins of Nottingham is taking on this fantastic feat in aid of Harmless. Mike is  aiming to raise a total of £5000 in aid of the charity Harmless. Harmless is an organisation that combines personal and professional experience to support people who self harm, their friends and families, and professionals. Harmless believe in recovery, and through their work they want to promote health and well being. So many people who self harm feel overwhelmed by their emotions, and this is something they want to work hard to change.Harmless was set up by people who understand self harm and at the heart of our service is a real sense of hope. All the very best from all of us here at Localgiving.   The Retirement fight This is Martin’s last fight before he hangs up his gloves. Martin is a keen boxer and says that it will be thrilling to do what he enjoys best and get to raise money for a worthwhile cause at the same time. Martin is aim to the raise £500 for the Riff Raff Society.The Riff Raff Society is an association of like minded well-doers. Riff Raff’s aim is to accept funding applications in the Greater Manchester area from people who are facing challenging situations in relation to ill health/disability or any other relevant misfortune.The Society aims to provide assistance by funding requests for life enhancing equipment, respite breaks, home improvements, or other beneficial services to those that we support.             3 Marathons in 3 Months for Cancer April is not running just one marathon but three! This fantastic feat of endurance is in aid a local cancer charity that was set up in memory of her friend Faye-Knowles Chapman. April is not only hoping to hit her target of £1000 but to raise awareness around cancer. The Faye Knowles Chapman Foundation was set up in March 2013, Faye Knowles-Chapman sadly lost her battle against Cervical Cancer at the young age of 27.  In memory of Faye they are trying to raise awareness amongst young women and people in general. They are campaigning to get the minimum age for screening reduced or even removed altogether.        
    1221 Posted by Byron Geldard
  • At Localgiving we like to highlight the amazing work fundraisers do for our charities and community groups. Every month I (Byron, Localgiving’s Membership Coordinator and helpline guy) pick out some some of the very best in fundraising events. Here are some of the most inspiring causes and fundraising appeals we have seen this month The 2020 TransAm Bike Race Many people say that everything is bigger in America: the cars, the food the buildings - and now apparently the bike rides. Mike is riding 4,300 miles across America. The Bradley Wiggins of Nottingham is taking on this fantastic feat in aid of Harmless. Mike is  aiming to raise a total of £5000 in aid of the charity Harmless. Harmless is an organisation that combines personal and professional experience to support people who self harm, their friends and families, and professionals. Harmless believe in recovery, and through their work they want to promote health and well being. So many people who self harm feel overwhelmed by their emotions, and this is something they want to work hard to change.Harmless was set up by people who understand self harm and at the heart of our service is a real sense of hope. All the very best from all of us here at Localgiving.   The Retirement fight This is Martin’s last fight before he hangs up his gloves. Martin is a keen boxer and says that it will be thrilling to do what he enjoys best and get to raise money for a worthwhile cause at the same time. Martin is aim to the raise £500 for the Riff Raff Society.The Riff Raff Society is an association of like minded well-doers. Riff Raff’s aim is to accept funding applications in the Greater Manchester area from people who are facing challenging situations in relation to ill health/disability or any other relevant misfortune.The Society aims to provide assistance by funding requests for life enhancing equipment, respite breaks, home improvements, or other beneficial services to those that we support.             3 Marathons in 3 Months for Cancer April is not running just one marathon but three! This fantastic feat of endurance is in aid a local cancer charity that was set up in memory of her friend Faye-Knowles Chapman. April is not only hoping to hit her target of £1000 but to raise awareness around cancer. The Faye Knowles Chapman Foundation was set up in March 2013, Faye Knowles-Chapman sadly lost her battle against Cervical Cancer at the young age of 27.  In memory of Faye they are trying to raise awareness amongst young women and people in general. They are campaigning to get the minimum age for screening reduced or even removed altogether.        
    Mar 14, 2019 1221
  • 28 Feb 2019
    Social media is vital for the growth of every charity, and is a powerful tool to deepen relationships with your beneficiaries, donors and supporters. Having engaging conversations and interacting with your audience will help you to build trust and relationships online, which in turn can lead to increased donations, traffic and awareness. However, it’s not always easy to engage and grow your charity’s online presence – it takes time, and should be done carefully and thoughtfully. I’ve had the pleasure of working with a range of amazing local charities recently. It has become apparent that working in a small charity often means that there is a lack of resource and time to focus on growing social media. With this in mind, I have compiled a list of seven recommendations on easy ways to help your online presence: 1) Use analytics to inform your content All social media platforms have their own analytics and insights, which show a range of data, including demographic breakdown of your audience, top interests and engagement metrics. By checking these insights on a regular basis across your different social media platforms, you can discover exactly who your audience is (rather than assuming you already know), and tailor content to ensure that it resonates with your audience. For example, on Twitter you can take a deep-dive into your audience’s interests. If the majority of your audience is interested in food and cooking, you could encourage them to carry out a bake sale fundraising at their work, raising money for your charity. 2) Source content from a variety of places (and ensure it’s relevant) (Photo credit: Georgia de Lotz) If all your content is from one source, the level of growth on your social media will quickly stagnate. Ensuring that content is a mix of own publications (blogs) and external publications will keep your audience engaged. If you find it difficult to source content from different places, invest time in creating Google alerts with relevant key words, making a list of publications that post interesting industry news, following thought leaders on LinkedIn, and creating Twitter lists. All of these methods will help keep your content varied, and keep your audience engaged. Remember to keep your target audience in mind – will they find this interesting or useful? What actions will this inspire them to take?   3) Make content visual, with a particular focus on video Research shows that video drives better results. For example, Facebook video posts have the highest average engagement and, on average, will produce twice the level of engagement of other post types. With more and more brands investing in video, charities could benefit from creating their own visual content. Information is more engaging if you see your favourite brand post a funny video or GIF, or explain a process through a helpful infographic. This is also the case for your charity; you can use a variety of content types to grow your audience, using humorous or compelling, interesting content to appeal to your audience. 4) Adapt content for different platforms (Photo credit: William Iven) According to GlobalWebIndex’s flagship report on the latest trends in social media, internet users around the world actively use an average of 7.6 social media channels. Using this data, it is safe to assume that your audience will be active on several different channels, and might even be following you on multiple accounts. As a social media consumer, their expectations of what they will see on each platform will vary. Avoid using the same content in the same format, across different platforms. For example, use fun and colloquial language on Facebook, post opinions on Twitter, and industry news and opportunities on LinkedIn. In addition, make sure image sizes and description lengths are optimised for each channel – always think of the user experience. There are various tools online that can help you to achieve this, for example you can use Canva for free, allowing you to amend images to optimal sizes for each social media platform. 5) Have a process for dealing with negative comments It’s not always sunshine and rainbows in the social media world, and there are often occasions where your charity will have to deal with negative responses online. Having a process in place will allow you to deal with these types of comments in a swift and professional manner. Our simple but effective online harassment infographic will help you navigate the process, with advice on when to comment, when to ignore and when to block. 6) Know what best practice looks like on each platform The layout, functions and purpose of each social media platform are different, therefore what works well on Facebook may not work well on Instagram. By knowing the fundamental basics and best practices of each platform, it will allow you to maximise your charity’s reach and engagement with your audience. If this is an element of your social media strategy that is challenging, then check out our sister company Lightful’s best practice guides for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter to help you. 7) Don’t use social media just to promote your organisation and services If you simply promote your own campaigns, you can guarantee that people will soon stop engaging with your platforms and your audience will slowly decrease in size. Social media should be about having a conversation and building relationships, posting a mix of stories about your audience, industry news and thought-leadership articles. This way, people will use your social media as a hub for information, where they can also discover more about exciting campaigns, news and your services. I hope you find this article useful; if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to find us on our Facebook, Twitter or Instagram! Angharad Francis is a Community Manager at Social Misfits Media, who work exclusively with charities, foundations, social enterprises and non-profits to help better use social media to reach their goals.   
    3064 Posted by Angharad Francis
  • Social media is vital for the growth of every charity, and is a powerful tool to deepen relationships with your beneficiaries, donors and supporters. Having engaging conversations and interacting with your audience will help you to build trust and relationships online, which in turn can lead to increased donations, traffic and awareness. However, it’s not always easy to engage and grow your charity’s online presence – it takes time, and should be done carefully and thoughtfully. I’ve had the pleasure of working with a range of amazing local charities recently. It has become apparent that working in a small charity often means that there is a lack of resource and time to focus on growing social media. With this in mind, I have compiled a list of seven recommendations on easy ways to help your online presence: 1) Use analytics to inform your content All social media platforms have their own analytics and insights, which show a range of data, including demographic breakdown of your audience, top interests and engagement metrics. By checking these insights on a regular basis across your different social media platforms, you can discover exactly who your audience is (rather than assuming you already know), and tailor content to ensure that it resonates with your audience. For example, on Twitter you can take a deep-dive into your audience’s interests. If the majority of your audience is interested in food and cooking, you could encourage them to carry out a bake sale fundraising at their work, raising money for your charity. 2) Source content from a variety of places (and ensure it’s relevant) (Photo credit: Georgia de Lotz) If all your content is from one source, the level of growth on your social media will quickly stagnate. Ensuring that content is a mix of own publications (blogs) and external publications will keep your audience engaged. If you find it difficult to source content from different places, invest time in creating Google alerts with relevant key words, making a list of publications that post interesting industry news, following thought leaders on LinkedIn, and creating Twitter lists. All of these methods will help keep your content varied, and keep your audience engaged. Remember to keep your target audience in mind – will they find this interesting or useful? What actions will this inspire them to take?   3) Make content visual, with a particular focus on video Research shows that video drives better results. For example, Facebook video posts have the highest average engagement and, on average, will produce twice the level of engagement of other post types. With more and more brands investing in video, charities could benefit from creating their own visual content. Information is more engaging if you see your favourite brand post a funny video or GIF, or explain a process through a helpful infographic. This is also the case for your charity; you can use a variety of content types to grow your audience, using humorous or compelling, interesting content to appeal to your audience. 4) Adapt content for different platforms (Photo credit: William Iven) According to GlobalWebIndex’s flagship report on the latest trends in social media, internet users around the world actively use an average of 7.6 social media channels. Using this data, it is safe to assume that your audience will be active on several different channels, and might even be following you on multiple accounts. As a social media consumer, their expectations of what they will see on each platform will vary. Avoid using the same content in the same format, across different platforms. For example, use fun and colloquial language on Facebook, post opinions on Twitter, and industry news and opportunities on LinkedIn. In addition, make sure image sizes and description lengths are optimised for each channel – always think of the user experience. There are various tools online that can help you to achieve this, for example you can use Canva for free, allowing you to amend images to optimal sizes for each social media platform. 5) Have a process for dealing with negative comments It’s not always sunshine and rainbows in the social media world, and there are often occasions where your charity will have to deal with negative responses online. Having a process in place will allow you to deal with these types of comments in a swift and professional manner. Our simple but effective online harassment infographic will help you navigate the process, with advice on when to comment, when to ignore and when to block. 6) Know what best practice looks like on each platform The layout, functions and purpose of each social media platform are different, therefore what works well on Facebook may not work well on Instagram. By knowing the fundamental basics and best practices of each platform, it will allow you to maximise your charity’s reach and engagement with your audience. If this is an element of your social media strategy that is challenging, then check out our sister company Lightful’s best practice guides for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter to help you. 7) Don’t use social media just to promote your organisation and services If you simply promote your own campaigns, you can guarantee that people will soon stop engaging with your platforms and your audience will slowly decrease in size. Social media should be about having a conversation and building relationships, posting a mix of stories about your audience, industry news and thought-leadership articles. This way, people will use your social media as a hub for information, where they can also discover more about exciting campaigns, news and your services. I hope you find this article useful; if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to find us on our Facebook, Twitter or Instagram! Angharad Francis is a Community Manager at Social Misfits Media, who work exclusively with charities, foundations, social enterprises and non-profits to help better use social media to reach their goals.   
    Feb 28, 2019 3064
  • 25 Feb 2019
    Small and local charities often operate on a shoe string so are acutely aware of the need to balance income and expenditure whilst generating social value. Critically, each charity must generate enough income to fulfill its mission whilst meeting social objectives.    For a charity to be viable, donors, funders and supporters must be in no doubt that the money that they give to a charity will be used to make a positive change in the lives of beneficiaries.   Outcomes and long-term impact are the significant changes, benefits and learning which has resulted from an organisation’s work. All too often, charities find it easier to communicate about outputs, detailing the numbers of people who have attended an event for example (quantitative information), rather than provide the more interesting qualitative information, detailing the difference made to someone’s life following an intervention. A lack of understanding about this can have a detrimental effect on an organisation’s ability to communicate the difference they make. This is also directly linked to the ability to raise funds and write compelling proposals to funders.   At the centre of performance management and understanding impact, is the requirement for services delivered by charities to serve the needs of beneficiaries who, after all, are the reason that small and local charities exist. This includes creating projects or areas of work that will address specific problems or issues, being able to evidence that need and explain why the need exists. The ability to analyse performance is also a management tool which allows organisations to ascertain whether the services they are delivering are effective and whether they are wanted or needed by beneficiaries. With the right information about need and impact, small and local charities can develop new services based on the changing needs of beneficiaries and abandon ineffective ones.   There is an inherent need for small and local organisations to demonstrate the effectiveness of their work but with limited resources this can be difficult. A first step is to have a clear plan of what must be achieved for a project or area of work, to clearly define aims and the outcomes/impact that will be produced, along with objectives and outputs. The NCVO Charities Evaluation Services planning triangle is a simple theory of change framework which can be used to achieve this. A monitoring and evaluation framework can be created to record outcomes and outputs by defining a series of KPIs (outcome and output indicators). Learning from the evidence collected and communicating successes with the world outside, including funders, is the part that is often neglected. Understanding impact with the ability to engage supporters is vital as impact is like a commodity which is bought/funded by donors.   Impactasaurus is a free impact monitoring and reporting tool which was designed for small and local charities. It is easy to use and focuses on soft outcomes, ideal for organisations helping individuals over time. Demonstrating and learning from your impact has never been easier.     Lydia Edwards – Corporate Fundraiser and Impactasaurus volunteer who has worked in organisational development roles at CVS’ building the capacity of small/local charities and in several fundraising/communications roles.   
    2025 Posted by Lydia Edwards
  • Small and local charities often operate on a shoe string so are acutely aware of the need to balance income and expenditure whilst generating social value. Critically, each charity must generate enough income to fulfill its mission whilst meeting social objectives.    For a charity to be viable, donors, funders and supporters must be in no doubt that the money that they give to a charity will be used to make a positive change in the lives of beneficiaries.   Outcomes and long-term impact are the significant changes, benefits and learning which has resulted from an organisation’s work. All too often, charities find it easier to communicate about outputs, detailing the numbers of people who have attended an event for example (quantitative information), rather than provide the more interesting qualitative information, detailing the difference made to someone’s life following an intervention. A lack of understanding about this can have a detrimental effect on an organisation’s ability to communicate the difference they make. This is also directly linked to the ability to raise funds and write compelling proposals to funders.   At the centre of performance management and understanding impact, is the requirement for services delivered by charities to serve the needs of beneficiaries who, after all, are the reason that small and local charities exist. This includes creating projects or areas of work that will address specific problems or issues, being able to evidence that need and explain why the need exists. The ability to analyse performance is also a management tool which allows organisations to ascertain whether the services they are delivering are effective and whether they are wanted or needed by beneficiaries. With the right information about need and impact, small and local charities can develop new services based on the changing needs of beneficiaries and abandon ineffective ones.   There is an inherent need for small and local organisations to demonstrate the effectiveness of their work but with limited resources this can be difficult. A first step is to have a clear plan of what must be achieved for a project or area of work, to clearly define aims and the outcomes/impact that will be produced, along with objectives and outputs. The NCVO Charities Evaluation Services planning triangle is a simple theory of change framework which can be used to achieve this. A monitoring and evaluation framework can be created to record outcomes and outputs by defining a series of KPIs (outcome and output indicators). Learning from the evidence collected and communicating successes with the world outside, including funders, is the part that is often neglected. Understanding impact with the ability to engage supporters is vital as impact is like a commodity which is bought/funded by donors.   Impactasaurus is a free impact monitoring and reporting tool which was designed for small and local charities. It is easy to use and focuses on soft outcomes, ideal for organisations helping individuals over time. Demonstrating and learning from your impact has never been easier.     Lydia Edwards – Corporate Fundraiser and Impactasaurus volunteer who has worked in organisational development roles at CVS’ building the capacity of small/local charities and in several fundraising/communications roles.   
    Feb 25, 2019 2025
  • 14 Feb 2019
    Recruiting trustees is an ongoing challenge for charities. The latest statistics suggest there are more than 100,000  unfilled charity trustee vacancies in the UK, with 74% of charities reporting difficulties hiring the trustees they need in 2018. It’s not only recruiting trustees that is challenging, it’s recruiting trustees with the right skills. Many charities face serious skills gaps, for instance many lack relevant legal, digital and marketing skills at board level. Increasingly, trustee boards are recognising the need to recruit trustees with more diverse skills, from a variety of different professional backgrounds to improve their effectiveness. The Charity Commission’s Taken on Trust report found that out of 700,000 trustees, two-thirds were male, the average age is 55-64 and 92% are white. The report highlighted there is a “danger that charity boards might become myopic in their views and in their decision-making”.  So how can charities ensure they have a diverse board with a broad range of skills and experience and that this is maintained? Here are some tips for recruiting Trustees in 2019: Conduct a skills audit Carry out a skills audit to check what skills the board already has and where the gaps may lie. Also check when the term of office is over for current trustees, so you can plan accordingly and ensure good succession planning. Think about your charitable objectives What is your mission? Does the board reflect the community you are serving? For instance, if you are a youth charity, can you appoint some younger trustees on the board that understand the issues younger people face today. If this is the case, you may need to change things to accommodate them. Younger trustees might not be able to take time out of their working day to attend meetings, so you may need to hold evening meetings instead.   Clear role description Conduct an audit of the competencies, knowledge and experience needed for the role and recruit in line with that brief. Make sure you have a clear vision of what your ideal new trustee will be like. Think about why someone would be interested in coming to volunteer for you. Robust recruitment process Plan the recruitment process properly scheduling in all activities and making sure those involved in the process are fully briefed. Recruiting a new trustee can take several weeks, so make sure you allow the time to do it well. Communication channels To attract the best talent, charities need to look outside their immediate networks. This may mean using communication channels such as social media. Think about where the people you would like to attract would be likely to see your advert – whether it's a local venue, specialist press, a volunteering website or elsewhere. Advertise the role Write a punchy advertising post it on your website and link to this via your social media networks. If you produce a newsletter, make sure you include the advert. Also use your current networks and engage the whole board in the process. Make sure everyone knows there is a trustee vacancy available. Use a specialist recruitment firm Consider using a professional recruitment firm with a track record of recruiting trustees. A recruitment firm will have a huge database of professionals seeking trustee roles and will able to match candidates to your exact requirements. Many companies offer a cost-effective service based on the size of the organisation. Be clear about the decision making process This needs to be clear upfront to avoid surprises later. Have a clear process for informal meetings, tours of services and interviews and who will conduct these. Interviews should be evidence based to test motivation as well as skills and experience. Make sure you always take verbal references at interview stage. Engaging new trustees A great induction can make all the difference to engage new trustees. It can also be useful for charities to assign a buddy to mentor and support new trustees. We find this can help new recruits get up to speed quickly and learn some historical details about the work of the trustees, which will help them feel more able to participate from the start at board meetings. Remember, trustees are custodians of the whole organisation, so recruiting the right people who will fit culturally with the organisation is crucial. Recruitment is an opportunity to talk about what the charity does and spread the word about the great work you are doing. The process itself can help to induct new trustees making them feel part of the organisation by the time they’re formally appointed. Sophie Livingstone is Managing Director of Trustees Unlimited. She is also Chair of early years charity Little Village and a trustee of the Royal Voluntary Service and of youth social action charity Generation Change, which she co-founded in 2013. Sophie also provides leadership to our burgeoning Step on Board programme which is transforming senior level employee volunteering.    
    2696 Posted by Sophie Livingstone
  • Recruiting trustees is an ongoing challenge for charities. The latest statistics suggest there are more than 100,000  unfilled charity trustee vacancies in the UK, with 74% of charities reporting difficulties hiring the trustees they need in 2018. It’s not only recruiting trustees that is challenging, it’s recruiting trustees with the right skills. Many charities face serious skills gaps, for instance many lack relevant legal, digital and marketing skills at board level. Increasingly, trustee boards are recognising the need to recruit trustees with more diverse skills, from a variety of different professional backgrounds to improve their effectiveness. The Charity Commission’s Taken on Trust report found that out of 700,000 trustees, two-thirds were male, the average age is 55-64 and 92% are white. The report highlighted there is a “danger that charity boards might become myopic in their views and in their decision-making”.  So how can charities ensure they have a diverse board with a broad range of skills and experience and that this is maintained? Here are some tips for recruiting Trustees in 2019: Conduct a skills audit Carry out a skills audit to check what skills the board already has and where the gaps may lie. Also check when the term of office is over for current trustees, so you can plan accordingly and ensure good succession planning. Think about your charitable objectives What is your mission? Does the board reflect the community you are serving? For instance, if you are a youth charity, can you appoint some younger trustees on the board that understand the issues younger people face today. If this is the case, you may need to change things to accommodate them. Younger trustees might not be able to take time out of their working day to attend meetings, so you may need to hold evening meetings instead.   Clear role description Conduct an audit of the competencies, knowledge and experience needed for the role and recruit in line with that brief. Make sure you have a clear vision of what your ideal new trustee will be like. Think about why someone would be interested in coming to volunteer for you. Robust recruitment process Plan the recruitment process properly scheduling in all activities and making sure those involved in the process are fully briefed. Recruiting a new trustee can take several weeks, so make sure you allow the time to do it well. Communication channels To attract the best talent, charities need to look outside their immediate networks. This may mean using communication channels such as social media. Think about where the people you would like to attract would be likely to see your advert – whether it's a local venue, specialist press, a volunteering website or elsewhere. Advertise the role Write a punchy advertising post it on your website and link to this via your social media networks. If you produce a newsletter, make sure you include the advert. Also use your current networks and engage the whole board in the process. Make sure everyone knows there is a trustee vacancy available. Use a specialist recruitment firm Consider using a professional recruitment firm with a track record of recruiting trustees. A recruitment firm will have a huge database of professionals seeking trustee roles and will able to match candidates to your exact requirements. Many companies offer a cost-effective service based on the size of the organisation. Be clear about the decision making process This needs to be clear upfront to avoid surprises later. Have a clear process for informal meetings, tours of services and interviews and who will conduct these. Interviews should be evidence based to test motivation as well as skills and experience. Make sure you always take verbal references at interview stage. Engaging new trustees A great induction can make all the difference to engage new trustees. It can also be useful for charities to assign a buddy to mentor and support new trustees. We find this can help new recruits get up to speed quickly and learn some historical details about the work of the trustees, which will help them feel more able to participate from the start at board meetings. Remember, trustees are custodians of the whole organisation, so recruiting the right people who will fit culturally with the organisation is crucial. Recruitment is an opportunity to talk about what the charity does and spread the word about the great work you are doing. The process itself can help to induct new trustees making them feel part of the organisation by the time they’re formally appointed. Sophie Livingstone is Managing Director of Trustees Unlimited. She is also Chair of early years charity Little Village and a trustee of the Royal Voluntary Service and of youth social action charity Generation Change, which she co-founded in 2013. Sophie also provides leadership to our burgeoning Step on Board programme which is transforming senior level employee volunteering.    
    Feb 14, 2019 2696
  • 11 Feb 2019
    As an organisation who work on abortion rights, which is still considered controversial in Northern Ireland, we were delighted when Isobel Anderson approached us to collaborate on a music video project. Isobel wrote a song in 2015, “4284_ / I'm A Life” using the words of one woman’s journey to England to access an abortion she should have been able to get here. We felt that suddenly this gave us an opportunity to speak to people who may not normally engage with political posts on social media or may not be aware of what the situation is still in Northern Ireland. Isobel has worked closely with Alliance for Choice since September last year and has high hopes for the music video, she explains, “I had wanted to write about the abuse of reproductive rights in Northern Ireland since I had moved to Belfast in 2009, but I found it difficult to know exactly how without misrepresenting people’s lived experience of the issue. Then, more and more people started sharing their stories online, and when I read Janet’s incredibly moving account, the song came together” Having had a number of successful appeals on Localgiving already, we knew it would be a great place to host our music video appeal. If we can raise our £5K target by 2nd March, we will launch the video live at a Queer Feminist Activist-run space in Belfast, with live music from local acts. We saw the power of stories with the referendum campaign in the Republic of Ireland, so we know how much more people can empathise when they can picture themselves in someone else’s shoes. Alliance for Choice have worked on a variety of education projects over the years and witnessed the incredible power of creating a space where people feel comfortable talking about their experiences of abortion, sex education, pregnancy and all of those stigmas. Reaching our target means we can make many more of these workshops and events happen. We are so proud of the video and so delighted that the song is so beautiful. Janet, whose incredible words are used for the song told us when she watched the video; “I cried. The opening line had me catch my breath, and the next thing I knew I was crying. They were complex tears, of surprise, tinged with sadness & then of joy. When I shared my story 4 years ago, I had no idea of the impact it would have, I am deeply honoured to hear some of my words in Isobel's song and I hope it had a profound effect on people as it did me. All of the people in the video have been involved one way or another, some people have travelled for abortion care, some people have helped others access it in Northern Ireland, others have been campaigning on the issue since the 1970s, there’s a whole range of activists and abortion seekers present in the video. To watch the teaser please go here: https://youtu.be/VFgHLjxWhiI To donate to the campaign please visit: https://localgiving.org/imalife For further information about Alliance for Choice please visit http://www.alliance4choice.com/ For further information about Isobel Anderson please visit http://www.isobelanderson.com/about     Emma Campbell is Co-Chair of Alliance for Choice, mother of Luca (nearly 2!) and a practising photographic artist. Alliance for Choice won the Liberty Long Walk to Freedom award with London Irish Abortion Rights Campaign and the FPA in 2017 and the Political Studies Association Campaign of the Year Award of 2018 for our work aiding the Repeal referendum in Ireland and the continuing work in NI      
    1549 Posted by Emma Campbell
  • As an organisation who work on abortion rights, which is still considered controversial in Northern Ireland, we were delighted when Isobel Anderson approached us to collaborate on a music video project. Isobel wrote a song in 2015, “4284_ / I'm A Life” using the words of one woman’s journey to England to access an abortion she should have been able to get here. We felt that suddenly this gave us an opportunity to speak to people who may not normally engage with political posts on social media or may not be aware of what the situation is still in Northern Ireland. Isobel has worked closely with Alliance for Choice since September last year and has high hopes for the music video, she explains, “I had wanted to write about the abuse of reproductive rights in Northern Ireland since I had moved to Belfast in 2009, but I found it difficult to know exactly how without misrepresenting people’s lived experience of the issue. Then, more and more people started sharing their stories online, and when I read Janet’s incredibly moving account, the song came together” Having had a number of successful appeals on Localgiving already, we knew it would be a great place to host our music video appeal. If we can raise our £5K target by 2nd March, we will launch the video live at a Queer Feminist Activist-run space in Belfast, with live music from local acts. We saw the power of stories with the referendum campaign in the Republic of Ireland, so we know how much more people can empathise when they can picture themselves in someone else’s shoes. Alliance for Choice have worked on a variety of education projects over the years and witnessed the incredible power of creating a space where people feel comfortable talking about their experiences of abortion, sex education, pregnancy and all of those stigmas. Reaching our target means we can make many more of these workshops and events happen. We are so proud of the video and so delighted that the song is so beautiful. Janet, whose incredible words are used for the song told us when she watched the video; “I cried. The opening line had me catch my breath, and the next thing I knew I was crying. They were complex tears, of surprise, tinged with sadness & then of joy. When I shared my story 4 years ago, I had no idea of the impact it would have, I am deeply honoured to hear some of my words in Isobel's song and I hope it had a profound effect on people as it did me. All of the people in the video have been involved one way or another, some people have travelled for abortion care, some people have helped others access it in Northern Ireland, others have been campaigning on the issue since the 1970s, there’s a whole range of activists and abortion seekers present in the video. To watch the teaser please go here: https://youtu.be/VFgHLjxWhiI To donate to the campaign please visit: https://localgiving.org/imalife For further information about Alliance for Choice please visit http://www.alliance4choice.com/ For further information about Isobel Anderson please visit http://www.isobelanderson.com/about     Emma Campbell is Co-Chair of Alliance for Choice, mother of Luca (nearly 2!) and a practising photographic artist. Alliance for Choice won the Liberty Long Walk to Freedom award with London Irish Abortion Rights Campaign and the FPA in 2017 and the Political Studies Association Campaign of the Year Award of 2018 for our work aiding the Repeal referendum in Ireland and the continuing work in NI      
    Feb 11, 2019 1549
  • 04 Feb 2019
    At Localgiving we like to highlight the inspirational challenges individual fundraisers carry out for our amazing charities and community groups. Every month I (Byron,Localgiving’s Membership Coordinator and helpline guy) pick out some of the very best active fundraisers on the platform. Here are some of the most inspiring causes and fundraising appeals we have seen this month: Beesands to Beesands coastal marathon challenge - Home-Start South Leicestershire Emma is the bee's knees by running the Beesand to Beesand half marathon (13.1094 miles). Emma is taking on this feat to support help support families; helping give children the best start in life. Emma has done a truly amazing job fundraising - raising over £2000 for the cause! A big well done from all of us at Localgving. Home Start supports families focusing on those with young children, who are struggling in their parenting role for a variety of reasons. Home Start operates across the large rural District of Harborough, and for many families the rural geography, in addition to other family pressures compounds their difficulties and the isolation they feel.  Twins run for Womankind - Womankind, Bristol Women's Therapy Centre Leela and Yasmin Carr-Bond, identical twin sisters, will be running a half marathon for Women Kind. Most people are going to be asking which one came first. This challenge is to raise awareness around the importance of mental health. Currently the duo have done an amazing job, raising over £1,800 - 305% of their initial target. A big well done from Localgiving. Womankind provides a helpline offering support to women in distress which received over 6,500 calls last year. Our face-to-face services for women with mental health problems include counselling, outreach therapy, group therapy, and a befriending service.The recent press stories of sexual abuse have prompted more women to ask for our help - almost half of the callers to our helpline have suffered sexual abuse/ assault, rape or domestic abuse. The need for our services has never been greater.  What a Grand Idea - Wessex MS Therapy Centre Kate is running the Bath Half for Wessex MS Therapy Centre. Kate has had MS for the past 5 years and says that the Wessex MS Therapy Centre “has not only helped me though the biggest change in my life but so many others”. Kate has currently raised over £700 for the charity and hopes to hit her Target of £1,300 for the charity. Wessex Ms Therapy Centre provide a range of therapies for our members in a well-equipped and friendly environment. Their healthcare professionals tailor programmes based on individual needs, whether you have been recently diagnosed or have been living with your condition for some time. They regularly review our services, taking into account the needs of our members, with the aim of providing the best possible care.   
    1509 Posted by Byron Geldard
  • At Localgiving we like to highlight the inspirational challenges individual fundraisers carry out for our amazing charities and community groups. Every month I (Byron,Localgiving’s Membership Coordinator and helpline guy) pick out some of the very best active fundraisers on the platform. Here are some of the most inspiring causes and fundraising appeals we have seen this month: Beesands to Beesands coastal marathon challenge - Home-Start South Leicestershire Emma is the bee's knees by running the Beesand to Beesand half marathon (13.1094 miles). Emma is taking on this feat to support help support families; helping give children the best start in life. Emma has done a truly amazing job fundraising - raising over £2000 for the cause! A big well done from all of us at Localgving. Home Start supports families focusing on those with young children, who are struggling in their parenting role for a variety of reasons. Home Start operates across the large rural District of Harborough, and for many families the rural geography, in addition to other family pressures compounds their difficulties and the isolation they feel.  Twins run for Womankind - Womankind, Bristol Women's Therapy Centre Leela and Yasmin Carr-Bond, identical twin sisters, will be running a half marathon for Women Kind. Most people are going to be asking which one came first. This challenge is to raise awareness around the importance of mental health. Currently the duo have done an amazing job, raising over £1,800 - 305% of their initial target. A big well done from Localgiving. Womankind provides a helpline offering support to women in distress which received over 6,500 calls last year. Our face-to-face services for women with mental health problems include counselling, outreach therapy, group therapy, and a befriending service.The recent press stories of sexual abuse have prompted more women to ask for our help - almost half of the callers to our helpline have suffered sexual abuse/ assault, rape or domestic abuse. The need for our services has never been greater.  What a Grand Idea - Wessex MS Therapy Centre Kate is running the Bath Half for Wessex MS Therapy Centre. Kate has had MS for the past 5 years and says that the Wessex MS Therapy Centre “has not only helped me though the biggest change in my life but so many others”. Kate has currently raised over £700 for the charity and hopes to hit her Target of £1,300 for the charity. Wessex Ms Therapy Centre provide a range of therapies for our members in a well-equipped and friendly environment. Their healthcare professionals tailor programmes based on individual needs, whether you have been recently diagnosed or have been living with your condition for some time. They regularly review our services, taking into account the needs of our members, with the aim of providing the best possible care.   
    Feb 04, 2019 1509