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278 blogs
  • 26 Jul 2016
    Recent research suggests us Brits are a charitable bunch, particularly happy to donate time and money to local causes. Combine that with our (admittedly un-researched!) love of tea and cake and you’ve got a sure-fire fundraising winner. Who doesn’t relish a coffee morning? Or a village fete? Simply set it up and away you go. Well, almost. Wise before the event Charity get-togethers are fraught with potential problems. There are plenty of unseen dangers waiting to scupper the unwary, and most of them involve the good old general public. We’ve all heard the ghastly cliché ‘where there’s blame there’s a claim’. Problem is, like most ghastly clichés, it’s true – and an indication of how compensation culture affects those trying to do good. Why? Because compensation culture is often the architect of a claim against your charity if someone’s injured or their property’s damaged, and it’s deemed your fault. In fact, 80% of people attending events assume you’ve ‘done something’ about their health and safety, and have insurance to cover them if something goes wrong. If you haven’t, it’s best for everyone they don’t find out the hard way. Unless you have deep pockets and a solid knowledge of health and safety legislation, you can’t afford to take chances. Fail to prepare, prepare to fail It’s useful to think about what can go wrong. For example, someone hurt during a village fete tug-of-war. Or a passer-by knocked out by an errant cricket ball. Perhaps a volunteer slipping on a wet kitchen floor. It’s a common misconception that the venue owner is liable for circumstances like these but unfortunately that’s not the case. If you’re the organiser, you’re liable.  And as you’re liable, a compensation claim could be made against your charity. If all this sounds a bit doom and gloom, don’t worry, it’s manageable. For starters, here are just three simple things you can do to reduce the chance of a claim: 1. Make a health and safety checklist. Have a good look around your venue, inside and out, and note any potential hazards. Pay particular attention to areas open to the public, and to any activities involving the public. For example, secure loose cables, smooth uneven terrain (if possible) and make it obvious where there’ll be moving vehicles. Make warning signs if needs be. 2. Look after your people. The law says you have a responsibility to provide a safe working environment, even for volunteers. If you’re asking them to do physical work (e.g. lifting) make sure they have training. Provide first aid kits, adequate toilet and washing facilities, and point out unsafe areas on site. Document everything. 3. Keep an eye out. Monitoring your event while it’s underway is as important as good planning before it. A turn in the weather, for example, can easily change a level playing field into a slip and trip minefield. Have a plan B, and make sure you have enough help to implement it. Risk management is prudent but it should be more than just a health and safety checklist. Mostly because, if someone’s injured and the HSE brings an action against the charity for a health and safety breach, the trustees can be personally liable. Charity insurance like MyCharityGuard.co.uk helps plug the gaps: public liability insurance covers third-party bodily injury and property damage claims while employers’ liability insurance covers employee illness and injury claims. Note: employers’ liability is legally required if you have employees, and volunteers are often classed as such. It’s sometimes a blurred line between the two and the HSE can fine those who get it wrong. As always, it’s best to ask your insurance broker for advice.           Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha Get your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity  
    1812 Posted by Kerri-Ann Hockley
  • Recent research suggests us Brits are a charitable bunch, particularly happy to donate time and money to local causes. Combine that with our (admittedly un-researched!) love of tea and cake and you’ve got a sure-fire fundraising winner. Who doesn’t relish a coffee morning? Or a village fete? Simply set it up and away you go. Well, almost. Wise before the event Charity get-togethers are fraught with potential problems. There are plenty of unseen dangers waiting to scupper the unwary, and most of them involve the good old general public. We’ve all heard the ghastly cliché ‘where there’s blame there’s a claim’. Problem is, like most ghastly clichés, it’s true – and an indication of how compensation culture affects those trying to do good. Why? Because compensation culture is often the architect of a claim against your charity if someone’s injured or their property’s damaged, and it’s deemed your fault. In fact, 80% of people attending events assume you’ve ‘done something’ about their health and safety, and have insurance to cover them if something goes wrong. If you haven’t, it’s best for everyone they don’t find out the hard way. Unless you have deep pockets and a solid knowledge of health and safety legislation, you can’t afford to take chances. Fail to prepare, prepare to fail It’s useful to think about what can go wrong. For example, someone hurt during a village fete tug-of-war. Or a passer-by knocked out by an errant cricket ball. Perhaps a volunteer slipping on a wet kitchen floor. It’s a common misconception that the venue owner is liable for circumstances like these but unfortunately that’s not the case. If you’re the organiser, you’re liable.  And as you’re liable, a compensation claim could be made against your charity. If all this sounds a bit doom and gloom, don’t worry, it’s manageable. For starters, here are just three simple things you can do to reduce the chance of a claim: 1. Make a health and safety checklist. Have a good look around your venue, inside and out, and note any potential hazards. Pay particular attention to areas open to the public, and to any activities involving the public. For example, secure loose cables, smooth uneven terrain (if possible) and make it obvious where there’ll be moving vehicles. Make warning signs if needs be. 2. Look after your people. The law says you have a responsibility to provide a safe working environment, even for volunteers. If you’re asking them to do physical work (e.g. lifting) make sure they have training. Provide first aid kits, adequate toilet and washing facilities, and point out unsafe areas on site. Document everything. 3. Keep an eye out. Monitoring your event while it’s underway is as important as good planning before it. A turn in the weather, for example, can easily change a level playing field into a slip and trip minefield. Have a plan B, and make sure you have enough help to implement it. Risk management is prudent but it should be more than just a health and safety checklist. Mostly because, if someone’s injured and the HSE brings an action against the charity for a health and safety breach, the trustees can be personally liable. Charity insurance like MyCharityGuard.co.uk helps plug the gaps: public liability insurance covers third-party bodily injury and property damage claims while employers’ liability insurance covers employee illness and injury claims. Note: employers’ liability is legally required if you have employees, and volunteers are often classed as such. It’s sometimes a blurred line between the two and the HSE can fine those who get it wrong. As always, it’s best to ask your insurance broker for advice.           Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha Get your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity  
    Jul 26, 2016 1812
  • 20 Jul 2016
      Jess is event planner for CharityComms, the membership network for communications professionals working in UK charities. At CharityComms we recognise that smaller charities face different communications challenges. How can you keep up with developments and trends across different communications disciplines when you cover them all? Who do you turn to for input and feedback when you're the only comms specialist in your organisation? And how do you make time for strategy when you may be the only one around to deal with the day-to-day? That’s why we’re delighted to announce the launch of our first dedicated small charities conference on 23 September. This will enable communicators from smaller organisations to connect with peers and access advice and shared experience on how to deliver comms impact with very limited resources. We’ve kept the cost as low as possible to make it accessible – just £80+vat for the full day for CharityComms members, £100+vat for non-members and £160+vat for corporate partners. See the full agenda and book now Understanding the comms needs of small charities Last year, we conducted a survey of small charity communicators to help us better understand their needs. Here’s what we learned: ‘Small’ is a relative term While the majority (64%) were from charities with income between £100k and £1m, 24% were at charities with over £1m turnover. A surprising 7% were from charities with over £5m turnover, but who presumably still considered themselves ‘small’. The NCVO’s Almanac classes a charity over £1m as ‘large’. We’ve targeted our event where we feel we can provide the best support, crucially to organisations which have at least part of a role specifically dedicated to communications. So our ‘small’ charity category encompasses incomes from £100k to £2m, though we reckon any charity of any size with just one person (either full or part-time) doing all the comms work also fits the bill. Training budgets are often the stuff of dreams Two-thirds of our survey respondents depend completely on free support. A quarter had attended no learning outside the office in the last year, and 30 respondents (27%) had attended no training, events or networking at all. This included charities in all size categories, including over £1m. One in three said they learn via networking with peers. Small charity communicators feel isolated Many of the people we spoke to said they felt the lack of a peer group, or of colleagues who understood their work. Said one, ‘I don’t have anyone to bounce ideas around with. My colleagues expect mine to be the last word on communications.’ Skills are missing across PR and digital – and time is always short The most frequently mentioned skills gaps were press and media relations, digital and social media skills and communications strategy, followed by the challenges of getting internal support, and of course, lack of time and resource. Targeted help We’ve developed the agenda for our small charities communications conference on 23 September in response to what we’ve learned, offering:  Expert sessions on some of the key areas raised in our research: strategy, PR, digital, brand and more Structured peer knowledge exchange using the Open Space model (sometimes called ‘unconference’ or ‘Birds of a feather’ sessions) Inspiring ‘Lightning talks’ from small charities doing great comms work on a shoestring What else does CharityComms have to offer small charities The CharityComms website has extensive free resources, including best practice guides to social media, crisis communications and more, and we’re looking at developing an online directory signposting good quality free or low-cost online resources and training opportunities. We’ve recently been awarded funding to provide free media training to small charities. More info on this in due course as we take this initiative forward. Find out more about the CharityComms Small charities communications conference Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha How to make friend with the media by Kay ParrisGet your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield  
    1586 Posted by Jess Day
  •   Jess is event planner for CharityComms, the membership network for communications professionals working in UK charities. At CharityComms we recognise that smaller charities face different communications challenges. How can you keep up with developments and trends across different communications disciplines when you cover them all? Who do you turn to for input and feedback when you're the only comms specialist in your organisation? And how do you make time for strategy when you may be the only one around to deal with the day-to-day? That’s why we’re delighted to announce the launch of our first dedicated small charities conference on 23 September. This will enable communicators from smaller organisations to connect with peers and access advice and shared experience on how to deliver comms impact with very limited resources. We’ve kept the cost as low as possible to make it accessible – just £80+vat for the full day for CharityComms members, £100+vat for non-members and £160+vat for corporate partners. See the full agenda and book now Understanding the comms needs of small charities Last year, we conducted a survey of small charity communicators to help us better understand their needs. Here’s what we learned: ‘Small’ is a relative term While the majority (64%) were from charities with income between £100k and £1m, 24% were at charities with over £1m turnover. A surprising 7% were from charities with over £5m turnover, but who presumably still considered themselves ‘small’. The NCVO’s Almanac classes a charity over £1m as ‘large’. We’ve targeted our event where we feel we can provide the best support, crucially to organisations which have at least part of a role specifically dedicated to communications. So our ‘small’ charity category encompasses incomes from £100k to £2m, though we reckon any charity of any size with just one person (either full or part-time) doing all the comms work also fits the bill. Training budgets are often the stuff of dreams Two-thirds of our survey respondents depend completely on free support. A quarter had attended no learning outside the office in the last year, and 30 respondents (27%) had attended no training, events or networking at all. This included charities in all size categories, including over £1m. One in three said they learn via networking with peers. Small charity communicators feel isolated Many of the people we spoke to said they felt the lack of a peer group, or of colleagues who understood their work. Said one, ‘I don’t have anyone to bounce ideas around with. My colleagues expect mine to be the last word on communications.’ Skills are missing across PR and digital – and time is always short The most frequently mentioned skills gaps were press and media relations, digital and social media skills and communications strategy, followed by the challenges of getting internal support, and of course, lack of time and resource. Targeted help We’ve developed the agenda for our small charities communications conference on 23 September in response to what we’ve learned, offering:  Expert sessions on some of the key areas raised in our research: strategy, PR, digital, brand and more Structured peer knowledge exchange using the Open Space model (sometimes called ‘unconference’ or ‘Birds of a feather’ sessions) Inspiring ‘Lightning talks’ from small charities doing great comms work on a shoestring What else does CharityComms have to offer small charities The CharityComms website has extensive free resources, including best practice guides to social media, crisis communications and more, and we’re looking at developing an online directory signposting good quality free or low-cost online resources and training opportunities. We’ve recently been awarded funding to provide free media training to small charities. More info on this in due course as we take this initiative forward. Find out more about the CharityComms Small charities communications conference Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha How to make friend with the media by Kay ParrisGet your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield  
    Jul 20, 2016 1586
  • 12 Jul 2016
    Video is a wonderful way of promoting your charity and showing people the work that you do. But it can be a daunting and expensive undertaking, especially for smaller charities. So here are my tips for making really good videos on a budget.  Keep it Real The most wonderful advocates for your charity are your beneficiaries and volunteers. Telling their stories can be a hugely effective way of communicating what you do and why someone should support you. And getting your volunteers to film themselves or to make films for you is a highly cost effective way of producing videos. The DIY approach not only adds authenticity but also means you can get some visually rich material: nothing makes people switch off quicker than ‘talking heads’. Anthony Nolan are masters of this approach: they empower their donors and volunteer fundraisers to make and up-load films to their YouTube Channels and fundraising pages. I love this film made by Annabelle Monks – it’s called My Friend the Stem Cell Donor and follows her friend Abbie as she makes a stem cell donation. Shot on a smart phone, Annabelle is able to be with Abbie all the way through and shows how easy it is to do. Keep it Short The YouTube stats are brutal: if a film is longer than a few minutes people stop watching in their droves. And Facebook counts anything longer than 3 seconds as a ‘view’. That means you should keep your films short – aim for a maximum of 3 minutes and if you can keep it to 90 secs then even better. To do this you need to be clear about your film’s message: it’s much better to say one thing clearly and engagingly, than 3 or 4 things in a long, muddled message. Fitness video for Age UK - NORMAN - PROMO VERSION from Magneto Films on Vimeo. We made this film for Age UK – it’s to promote their Fit For the Future campaign to get Older People moving. It tells the story of Norman: his wife’s death, a meeting with an old friend, their love of dancing and how Age UK helped him. All in 55 secs. But there is only one message: Fit For the Future works. Keep it Focused Even the best video is only a tool to help you communicate – simply making a film won’t bring more people to your website or increase your donations. To be successful you’ve got to focus on the audience. If you can answer 3 basic questions, then you’ve got a good chance of making something that will be effective: Who is going to watch this? Where will they watch it? What do we want them to do when they’ve watched it? This film from the Human Rights Commission answers these brilliantly: aimed at informing young mums about their employment rights it features blogger mums (the ‘who’), who all post on a mums’ channel (the ‘where’) and gives clear direction at the end (the ‘what’). Get it Out There! Once you’ve made your film, let people know it’s ready to watch. It’s no good just plopping it onto YouTube or embedding it on your website, you’ve got to promote and encourage people to share it. One of the simplest ways of doing this is to use your mailing list: email your supporters to let them know you’re making a film and tease them with some behind the scenes pics and quotes. You can put these on Twitter and Facebook too. Once the film’s made, email them again and tell them where they can watch it and ask them to share it. Make sure it goes on your Facebook page and consider doing paid promotion: it can be surprisingly cheap and very effective. Make short clips and put them out on Twitter. These clips from the Children’s Society are from a longer film but are still very powerful. Don’t forget the local papers – a well written press release along with some video content for their website is always welcome and a great way to reach new people. Jeremy Jeffs is a founding partner of Magneto Films, a video production company that specialises in working with charities, not-for-profits and the public sector. Jeremy’s an award winning film maker with credits for films and series for BBC TV, Channel 4 and NatGeo. At Magneto he’s worked with charities and brands that include Age UK, Children’s Society and Macmillan Cancer Support and with brands including Ford and Expedia. He blogs on the latest charity videos at www.magnetofilms.com   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Using  Video for Effective Fundraising How to make friend with the media Get your charity’s voice heard   
    2751 Posted by Jeremy Jeffs
  • Video is a wonderful way of promoting your charity and showing people the work that you do. But it can be a daunting and expensive undertaking, especially for smaller charities. So here are my tips for making really good videos on a budget.  Keep it Real The most wonderful advocates for your charity are your beneficiaries and volunteers. Telling their stories can be a hugely effective way of communicating what you do and why someone should support you. And getting your volunteers to film themselves or to make films for you is a highly cost effective way of producing videos. The DIY approach not only adds authenticity but also means you can get some visually rich material: nothing makes people switch off quicker than ‘talking heads’. Anthony Nolan are masters of this approach: they empower their donors and volunteer fundraisers to make and up-load films to their YouTube Channels and fundraising pages. I love this film made by Annabelle Monks – it’s called My Friend the Stem Cell Donor and follows her friend Abbie as she makes a stem cell donation. Shot on a smart phone, Annabelle is able to be with Abbie all the way through and shows how easy it is to do. Keep it Short The YouTube stats are brutal: if a film is longer than a few minutes people stop watching in their droves. And Facebook counts anything longer than 3 seconds as a ‘view’. That means you should keep your films short – aim for a maximum of 3 minutes and if you can keep it to 90 secs then even better. To do this you need to be clear about your film’s message: it’s much better to say one thing clearly and engagingly, than 3 or 4 things in a long, muddled message. Fitness video for Age UK - NORMAN - PROMO VERSION from Magneto Films on Vimeo. We made this film for Age UK – it’s to promote their Fit For the Future campaign to get Older People moving. It tells the story of Norman: his wife’s death, a meeting with an old friend, their love of dancing and how Age UK helped him. All in 55 secs. But there is only one message: Fit For the Future works. Keep it Focused Even the best video is only a tool to help you communicate – simply making a film won’t bring more people to your website or increase your donations. To be successful you’ve got to focus on the audience. If you can answer 3 basic questions, then you’ve got a good chance of making something that will be effective: Who is going to watch this? Where will they watch it? What do we want them to do when they’ve watched it? This film from the Human Rights Commission answers these brilliantly: aimed at informing young mums about their employment rights it features blogger mums (the ‘who’), who all post on a mums’ channel (the ‘where’) and gives clear direction at the end (the ‘what’). Get it Out There! Once you’ve made your film, let people know it’s ready to watch. It’s no good just plopping it onto YouTube or embedding it on your website, you’ve got to promote and encourage people to share it. One of the simplest ways of doing this is to use your mailing list: email your supporters to let them know you’re making a film and tease them with some behind the scenes pics and quotes. You can put these on Twitter and Facebook too. Once the film’s made, email them again and tell them where they can watch it and ask them to share it. Make sure it goes on your Facebook page and consider doing paid promotion: it can be surprisingly cheap and very effective. Make short clips and put them out on Twitter. These clips from the Children’s Society are from a longer film but are still very powerful. Don’t forget the local papers – a well written press release along with some video content for their website is always welcome and a great way to reach new people. Jeremy Jeffs is a founding partner of Magneto Films, a video production company that specialises in working with charities, not-for-profits and the public sector. Jeremy’s an award winning film maker with credits for films and series for BBC TV, Channel 4 and NatGeo. At Magneto he’s worked with charities and brands that include Age UK, Children’s Society and Macmillan Cancer Support and with brands including Ford and Expedia. He blogs on the latest charity videos at www.magnetofilms.com   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Using  Video for Effective Fundraising How to make friend with the media Get your charity’s voice heard   
    Jul 12, 2016 2751
  • 11 Jul 2016
    Joe Burns is the North West regional development manager for Localgiving. Before that he was a corporate fundraiser for a national charity, and worked with firms in the FTSE 100 as well as small family run businesses. Just 24 little hours are all some of our groups need to make a real difference in their communities… A few weeks back Localgiving formally ‘launched’ its regional development programme in the North West. To mark the launch we attended  a pond building session run by the Manchester social enterprise Sow the City, who were building the pond as part of Manchester City Council’s “Growing Manchester” initiative. To the uninitiated, a pond building session might seem like a small thing. But just by focusing on this one activity, we can get a real sense of the good work local charities do every day, the seemingly little things which can make a real difference.   For this was no ordinary pond, and this was no ordinary exercise in pond building either. For this pond was being built at a care and respite centre in Baguley, catering for adults with long term mental disabilities. Those of us who have never used or visited care centres may think of them as  dull, depressing places. Nothing could be further from the truth. Residents are encouraged to take part in a range of activities, activities which help to build a sense of community and fun. Of the many activities this care centre provides, one of the most popular is a green fingered gardening club for residents. This club has developed an overgrown garden into a veritable Eden in a few short years. It was for this reason that we were there building our pond. First and foremost, this pond building was an opportunity to further develop a green space used by all the residents; a chance to make the centre an even more pleasant place to be. A good wildlife pond acts as a magnet to a whole host of creatures and plants. And so, a small patch of Baguley is now teeming with greenery and life which wasn’t there only 24 hours earlier. Perhaps even more importantly, this was a chance for residents to get stuck in. A chance for them to get their hands dirty, to get a bit of exercise, to have a bit of banter, and a chance to learn a bit more about nature - a chance many residents took with aplomb! Building that pond turned a fairly mundane Wednesday into something memorable, something enjoyable and fun. And the pond was theirs. They had helped to build it, and in less than a day too. One pond building activity, taking place over one day. We see something that looks, on the surface, small and inconsequential. But like the ripples of a pebble dropped in water, the good vibrations spread out beyond that one day into an entire community. This is just one example I’ve seen amongst many with the groups we support on Localgiving. They all make real, lasting differences – and this is why local charities not only need, but in fact they deserve and demand our support.  Want to make a difference in less than 24 hours? You could do a lot worse than to donate to one of our charities.     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:  Corporate Fundraising for local charitiesHow small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmenThe Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker  
    1349 Posted by Joe Burns
  • Joe Burns is the North West regional development manager for Localgiving. Before that he was a corporate fundraiser for a national charity, and worked with firms in the FTSE 100 as well as small family run businesses. Just 24 little hours are all some of our groups need to make a real difference in their communities… A few weeks back Localgiving formally ‘launched’ its regional development programme in the North West. To mark the launch we attended  a pond building session run by the Manchester social enterprise Sow the City, who were building the pond as part of Manchester City Council’s “Growing Manchester” initiative. To the uninitiated, a pond building session might seem like a small thing. But just by focusing on this one activity, we can get a real sense of the good work local charities do every day, the seemingly little things which can make a real difference.   For this was no ordinary pond, and this was no ordinary exercise in pond building either. For this pond was being built at a care and respite centre in Baguley, catering for adults with long term mental disabilities. Those of us who have never used or visited care centres may think of them as  dull, depressing places. Nothing could be further from the truth. Residents are encouraged to take part in a range of activities, activities which help to build a sense of community and fun. Of the many activities this care centre provides, one of the most popular is a green fingered gardening club for residents. This club has developed an overgrown garden into a veritable Eden in a few short years. It was for this reason that we were there building our pond. First and foremost, this pond building was an opportunity to further develop a green space used by all the residents; a chance to make the centre an even more pleasant place to be. A good wildlife pond acts as a magnet to a whole host of creatures and plants. And so, a small patch of Baguley is now teeming with greenery and life which wasn’t there only 24 hours earlier. Perhaps even more importantly, this was a chance for residents to get stuck in. A chance for them to get their hands dirty, to get a bit of exercise, to have a bit of banter, and a chance to learn a bit more about nature - a chance many residents took with aplomb! Building that pond turned a fairly mundane Wednesday into something memorable, something enjoyable and fun. And the pond was theirs. They had helped to build it, and in less than a day too. One pond building activity, taking place over one day. We see something that looks, on the surface, small and inconsequential. But like the ripples of a pebble dropped in water, the good vibrations spread out beyond that one day into an entire community. This is just one example I’ve seen amongst many with the groups we support on Localgiving. They all make real, lasting differences – and this is why local charities not only need, but in fact they deserve and demand our support.  Want to make a difference in less than 24 hours? You could do a lot worse than to donate to one of our charities.     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:  Corporate Fundraising for local charitiesHow small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmenThe Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker  
    Jul 11, 2016 1349
  • 08 Jul 2016
    This article follows on from Natasha’s Roe’s recent blog on how Brand Management can help Small Charities to Raise More Money. Here Natasha explores how small charities can overcome barriers to branding investment.   What are the main barriers to branding that small charities face? Working with Cass Business School, I carried out a study of 127 small UK charities with annual incomes of £1 million or less a year –  the types of groups that make up 97.2% of the sector.   As expected, small charities do face barriers to investing in branding. However, there are practical ways of overcoming barriers, including suggestions from CharityComms’ Building a Brand that Delivers conference. The barriers small charities ‘strongly agreed’ with were: We don’t have the money to invest in branding (51.6%) We don’t have the resources (people and time) (39.3%) The barriers they ‘agreed’ with were: We do not have the right expertise (58.8%) Supporters and funders do not welcome us spending on branding (45.9%)     Tips to overcoming your branding barriers 1) Make branding a team responsibility Get people from across your organisation involved in brand management – trustees and volunteers too. Leave branding to a single person or team of senior people and you will experience more barriers. If your charity is short on expertise, read charity branding blogs, visit KnowHowNonProfit and look out for workshops run by CharityComms and Small Charities Coalition. 2) Lack of money: Good brand guidelines Brand guidelines need to cover how you communicate in words and pictures and cover all forms of communication – print, website, social media, photography, video and co-branding. Many larger charity and commercial organisations’ guidelines are online. Use them as templates. Adobe’s Corporate Brand Guidelines is an excellent resource. 3) Lack of expertise and resources: Stick to guidelines Clarity and consistency really help build a brand - don't be tempted to ‘make exceptions’. Establish an annual guidelines review, where brand application can be discussed based on what is best for the whole charity – not on a ‘case by case’ basis. 4) Lack of resources and time: Prioritise spending on templates If you have any brand budget, invest it in a vector copy of your logo and professional templates for external communications – e.g. Word, PowerPoint, e-newsletters, flyers, posters and report covers. Commission as many as you use regularly and insist everyone uses them. Templates mean audiences know all materials are from the same charity and staff and volunteers don’t spend time setting up files for each communication. 5) Resistance to investment: Surveys Use free tools like Survey Monkey and do an annual survey of your beneficiaries, customers, members and supporters. Which brand elements are clear? Which encourage people to engage with your charity? What needs to change? Ask questions that test people’s knowledge, attitude and behaviours. Understanding your audiences’ needs helps build a business case for brand investment and ensures spending is targeted to the greatest needs. 6) Share stories – externally and internally More people in small charities are close to the people they help and their stories. Celebrate your brand by sharing those stories. Our study found that many small charities didn’t see storytelling as part of brand management but it’s where small charities can lead larger ones. There are more opportunities for everyone to be a story collector and teller – any smart phone can capture publishable photos, videos and audio. Apps like Instagram mean you can edit on a phone before posting on social media, your website, newsletters, Localgiving or putting into a presentation.   Natasha Roe is Founding Director of Red Pencil and carried out research with small charities during her MSc studies with Cass Business School. She is looking for small charities (£1m p/y or less) interested in testing out the branding models. Please email hello@redpencil.co.uk to find out more. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Brand Management can help Small Charities to Raise more Money by Natasha Roe 3 Tips to tell Your Story on Instagram by Nisha Kotecha Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack   
    2899 Posted by Natasha Roe
  • This article follows on from Natasha’s Roe’s recent blog on how Brand Management can help Small Charities to Raise More Money. Here Natasha explores how small charities can overcome barriers to branding investment.   What are the main barriers to branding that small charities face? Working with Cass Business School, I carried out a study of 127 small UK charities with annual incomes of £1 million or less a year –  the types of groups that make up 97.2% of the sector.   As expected, small charities do face barriers to investing in branding. However, there are practical ways of overcoming barriers, including suggestions from CharityComms’ Building a Brand that Delivers conference. The barriers small charities ‘strongly agreed’ with were: We don’t have the money to invest in branding (51.6%) We don’t have the resources (people and time) (39.3%) The barriers they ‘agreed’ with were: We do not have the right expertise (58.8%) Supporters and funders do not welcome us spending on branding (45.9%)     Tips to overcoming your branding barriers 1) Make branding a team responsibility Get people from across your organisation involved in brand management – trustees and volunteers too. Leave branding to a single person or team of senior people and you will experience more barriers. If your charity is short on expertise, read charity branding blogs, visit KnowHowNonProfit and look out for workshops run by CharityComms and Small Charities Coalition. 2) Lack of money: Good brand guidelines Brand guidelines need to cover how you communicate in words and pictures and cover all forms of communication – print, website, social media, photography, video and co-branding. Many larger charity and commercial organisations’ guidelines are online. Use them as templates. Adobe’s Corporate Brand Guidelines is an excellent resource. 3) Lack of expertise and resources: Stick to guidelines Clarity and consistency really help build a brand - don't be tempted to ‘make exceptions’. Establish an annual guidelines review, where brand application can be discussed based on what is best for the whole charity – not on a ‘case by case’ basis. 4) Lack of resources and time: Prioritise spending on templates If you have any brand budget, invest it in a vector copy of your logo and professional templates for external communications – e.g. Word, PowerPoint, e-newsletters, flyers, posters and report covers. Commission as many as you use regularly and insist everyone uses them. Templates mean audiences know all materials are from the same charity and staff and volunteers don’t spend time setting up files for each communication. 5) Resistance to investment: Surveys Use free tools like Survey Monkey and do an annual survey of your beneficiaries, customers, members and supporters. Which brand elements are clear? Which encourage people to engage with your charity? What needs to change? Ask questions that test people’s knowledge, attitude and behaviours. Understanding your audiences’ needs helps build a business case for brand investment and ensures spending is targeted to the greatest needs. 6) Share stories – externally and internally More people in small charities are close to the people they help and their stories. Celebrate your brand by sharing those stories. Our study found that many small charities didn’t see storytelling as part of brand management but it’s where small charities can lead larger ones. There are more opportunities for everyone to be a story collector and teller – any smart phone can capture publishable photos, videos and audio. Apps like Instagram mean you can edit on a phone before posting on social media, your website, newsletters, Localgiving or putting into a presentation.   Natasha Roe is Founding Director of Red Pencil and carried out research with small charities during her MSc studies with Cass Business School. She is looking for small charities (£1m p/y or less) interested in testing out the branding models. Please email hello@redpencil.co.uk to find out more. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Brand Management can help Small Charities to Raise more Money by Natasha Roe 3 Tips to tell Your Story on Instagram by Nisha Kotecha Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack   
    Jul 08, 2016 2899
  • 27 Jun 2016
    If your local newspaper were to offer your charity a free centre page spread, you’d jump at the chance. Who wouldn’t? Google have been offering charities the online equivalent for over 13 years. If you haven’t already, here’s how to make the most out of this opportunity. So, what is AdWords? When looking to find a service, a club or an activity what is the first thing we do? These days the vast majority of people would start with a Google search. It is therefore essential that your group appears on the first page of a Google search for your activity or services. Google AdWords is an advertising service designed to make this happen. Google Adwords ensures that display ads will appear for people searching for charities or groups like you.   It’s FREE! Through its Ad Grants programme, Google gives non-profit organisations $10,000 (£6,600) worth of free ads per month to promote their mission, services and harness new supporters, volunteers and donors via Google search. For charities that provide exceptional account management and can demonstrate a history of being able to meet account criteria, there is an opportunity for them to apply and receive ‘Google Grants Pro’ status benefiting from $40,000 (£26,500) per month of digital spend to use within Google search. If you already have a Google Grant, Receptional can help you increase your results - scroll down to the end of this article to find out how. How do we get started? It's easy to get started with Google Ad Grants. Firstly, you need to check your eligibility and sign up. Google provide clear instructions as to how to do this HERE. Once you’ve signed up, here are the 4 key steps you need to know: A) Think of the ‘keywords’ that describe your charity – these should be words that describe your cause and activities. Try to think of synonyms, too! B) Decide where people will see your adverts – as a local charity you may choose to restrict your adverts to your specific geographical area to ensure your adverts have maximum impact. A person in Boston, US is unlikely to be able to attend your activity in Boston, Lincolnshire! C) Write some clear, punchy content about your charity with a link to your donation page, website or campaign. D)  Decide how much of the grant money to ‘pay’ each time someone clicks through to your website via the link (a maximum of $2). Of course, the best results are delivered by companies that are Google Qualified. To fully benefit  from Google Adwords it would be recommended to use a resource that understands the more complicated aspects of the service - Bid Capping, Quality Score and how to compete with other charities that are also running the Google Grants programme. Need extra help? Receptional is a digital agency that works with a range of charitable organisations, both small and large for helping set up a Google Grant to assisting with management. They offer: Free advice for those charities that are interested in applying for a Google Grant and for charities that currently run a Google Grant but want to achieve better results, a free no obligation health check that provides clear actionable advice. Want more information? Why not contact Receptional for your Free Google Grant Health check today? Rob Bradley - Benefiting from a broad digital background encompassing start-up, professional services, business management and culminating with running a Digital Agency overseas Rob is a creative analyst at heart that enjoys helping organisations and Charities gain market share, increase their point of difference and improve their digital ROI. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandHow Charities can tap into the hyperlocal by Zoe Amar  
    3143 Posted by Rob Bradley
  • If your local newspaper were to offer your charity a free centre page spread, you’d jump at the chance. Who wouldn’t? Google have been offering charities the online equivalent for over 13 years. If you haven’t already, here’s how to make the most out of this opportunity. So, what is AdWords? When looking to find a service, a club or an activity what is the first thing we do? These days the vast majority of people would start with a Google search. It is therefore essential that your group appears on the first page of a Google search for your activity or services. Google AdWords is an advertising service designed to make this happen. Google Adwords ensures that display ads will appear for people searching for charities or groups like you.   It’s FREE! Through its Ad Grants programme, Google gives non-profit organisations $10,000 (£6,600) worth of free ads per month to promote their mission, services and harness new supporters, volunteers and donors via Google search. For charities that provide exceptional account management and can demonstrate a history of being able to meet account criteria, there is an opportunity for them to apply and receive ‘Google Grants Pro’ status benefiting from $40,000 (£26,500) per month of digital spend to use within Google search. If you already have a Google Grant, Receptional can help you increase your results - scroll down to the end of this article to find out how. How do we get started? It's easy to get started with Google Ad Grants. Firstly, you need to check your eligibility and sign up. Google provide clear instructions as to how to do this HERE. Once you’ve signed up, here are the 4 key steps you need to know: A) Think of the ‘keywords’ that describe your charity – these should be words that describe your cause and activities. Try to think of synonyms, too! B) Decide where people will see your adverts – as a local charity you may choose to restrict your adverts to your specific geographical area to ensure your adverts have maximum impact. A person in Boston, US is unlikely to be able to attend your activity in Boston, Lincolnshire! C) Write some clear, punchy content about your charity with a link to your donation page, website or campaign. D)  Decide how much of the grant money to ‘pay’ each time someone clicks through to your website via the link (a maximum of $2). Of course, the best results are delivered by companies that are Google Qualified. To fully benefit  from Google Adwords it would be recommended to use a resource that understands the more complicated aspects of the service - Bid Capping, Quality Score and how to compete with other charities that are also running the Google Grants programme. Need extra help? Receptional is a digital agency that works with a range of charitable organisations, both small and large for helping set up a Google Grant to assisting with management. They offer: Free advice for those charities that are interested in applying for a Google Grant and for charities that currently run a Google Grant but want to achieve better results, a free no obligation health check that provides clear actionable advice. Want more information? Why not contact Receptional for your Free Google Grant Health check today? Rob Bradley - Benefiting from a broad digital background encompassing start-up, professional services, business management and culminating with running a Digital Agency overseas Rob is a creative analyst at heart that enjoys helping organisations and Charities gain market share, increase their point of difference and improve their digital ROI. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandHow Charities can tap into the hyperlocal by Zoe Amar  
    Jun 27, 2016 3143
  • 20 Jun 2016
    Great photos and good use of hashtags are common tips when it comes to Instagram. But surely it takes more than this to get an engaged following on Instagram? Here are three tips shared at a Social Misfits Media event I attended at Instagram HQ in London recently: What Story Are You Trying To Tell? Instagram is a powerful visual storytelling platform. Before you start posting your photos and telling your story you need to decide what you are actually trying to tell your audience. You can decide on the sort of photos you should share and how you will take them only once you have figured out your story. Engage with Influencers There are a lot of people on Instagram – in the UK there are 14 million people actively using it every month. As with other platforms, it can be difficult to get your posts seen, especially if you do not have a budget to spend on advertising. A good way to get your posts in front of your ideal audience is to engage with influencers. The best way to do this is to send them a direct message via the Instagram App itself. It’s important to remember than an influencer doesn’t necessarily need to have a lot of followers – an engaged smaller audience is much more useful than a large audience who will not respond to any calls to action. Engage with your Instagram Audience Offline Instagram’s Community Team has the aim of ‘connecting people to their passions’. This is an online and offline mission. Instameets - events where Instagrammers meet each other, share photography advice and create content together to post on their personal feeds – are a great way to connect with your community. You don’t need to think of your own event, you can get involved in events that are already being organised, like #WWIM13 (World Wide Instameet). For example, If you have an interesting building to show off, #Empty (where Instagrammers are invited to an empty building and given the opportunity to push their creative boundaries while taking some great shots and thereby creating great publicity for the organisation) is a great movement to get involved in. Instagram have been testing a new algorithm recently, and they have also increased the video lengths allowed on the platform. With social media changing so rapidly it can be easy to feel overwhelmed and not know where to start. By focusing on these three tips you will be able to grow an active, engaged following on Instagram. Nisha Kotecha is the Founder of Good News Shared, a website showcasing the impact and achievements of charitable organisations around the world. Nisha also hosts the Good News Shared podcast where she interviews volunteers to highlight stories that deserve to be heard.   If you liked this blog post, why not also read: 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha A Picture is worth a thousand characters by Jeanne- Claire MorleyThe Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker   Image: Instagram: ZoboLondon 
    3569 Posted by Nisha Kotecha
  • Great photos and good use of hashtags are common tips when it comes to Instagram. But surely it takes more than this to get an engaged following on Instagram? Here are three tips shared at a Social Misfits Media event I attended at Instagram HQ in London recently: What Story Are You Trying To Tell? Instagram is a powerful visual storytelling platform. Before you start posting your photos and telling your story you need to decide what you are actually trying to tell your audience. You can decide on the sort of photos you should share and how you will take them only once you have figured out your story. Engage with Influencers There are a lot of people on Instagram – in the UK there are 14 million people actively using it every month. As with other platforms, it can be difficult to get your posts seen, especially if you do not have a budget to spend on advertising. A good way to get your posts in front of your ideal audience is to engage with influencers. The best way to do this is to send them a direct message via the Instagram App itself. It’s important to remember than an influencer doesn’t necessarily need to have a lot of followers – an engaged smaller audience is much more useful than a large audience who will not respond to any calls to action. Engage with your Instagram Audience Offline Instagram’s Community Team has the aim of ‘connecting people to their passions’. This is an online and offline mission. Instameets - events where Instagrammers meet each other, share photography advice and create content together to post on their personal feeds – are a great way to connect with your community. You don’t need to think of your own event, you can get involved in events that are already being organised, like #WWIM13 (World Wide Instameet). For example, If you have an interesting building to show off, #Empty (where Instagrammers are invited to an empty building and given the opportunity to push their creative boundaries while taking some great shots and thereby creating great publicity for the organisation) is a great movement to get involved in. Instagram have been testing a new algorithm recently, and they have also increased the video lengths allowed on the platform. With social media changing so rapidly it can be easy to feel overwhelmed and not know where to start. By focusing on these three tips you will be able to grow an active, engaged following on Instagram. Nisha Kotecha is the Founder of Good News Shared, a website showcasing the impact and achievements of charitable organisations around the world. Nisha also hosts the Good News Shared podcast where she interviews volunteers to highlight stories that deserve to be heard.   If you liked this blog post, why not also read: 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha A Picture is worth a thousand characters by Jeanne- Claire MorleyThe Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker   Image: Instagram: ZoboLondon 
    Jun 20, 2016 3569
  • 16 Jun 2016
    This summer David Charles and his girlfriend, Caz, are cycling an astonishing 3000 Miles across Europe, raising funds for London based refugee charity, The Bike Project. Starting in London and finishing at the town of Gaziantep on the Syria-Turkey border, this journey retraces the route taken by the thousands of refugees who have fled the war-torn country in recent years. Along the way they will be exploring how life has changed, both for refugees and also for communities living along the migration route. Localgiving recently took the chance to chat to David about his inspiration – and perspiration! What inspired you to take on this challenge? “The inspiration for this trip came directly from the volunteer work we've been doing with The Bike Project in London. The Bike Project takes second hand bikes, fixes them up and donates them to refugees so that they can travel around the city”. “Last year, we were part of a mass cycle ride to the migrant camp in Calais, donating more than 80 bikes to refugees there. That gave me the idea to cycle onwards, through France and Germany, across the Balkans to Greece and beyond, from where hundreds of thousands of people are trying to make a new life for themselves in Europe”. “I have been lucky enough in my life to be able to travel freely throughout the world, and have always received wonderful hospitality from everyone I have met, from Europe and the Americas to the Middle East and Asia. My support for charities like The Bike Project comes from a desire to return the generous hospitality that I have received to newcomers in my country, particularly to those who have been forced from their homes without the freedom of a passport and a ticket home”. What difficulties do you think you may face along the way? “The main challenges of the trip so far have been incredibly mundane: where to refill our water bottles, how to eat enough good food without spending too much money, when to stop for the night. Then yesterday I got bitten by a tick and now I'm panicking that I've got Lyme Disease! But in truth the only real challenge was committing to the ride, giving up our flats and leaving. Everything else is just logistics. What training have you done for the trip? “We both cycle a lot in London because public transport is so expensive. While I have done some bike touring before, Caz had never cycled more than 20 miles for two days in a row before this trip!” “Neither of us are what you'd call ‘serious cyclists’ - for us, it's just the easiest way of getting around. I believe that if you can cycle a mile to the shops, then you can probably cycle two and three miles. Keep turning your pedals, put those miles together and you've got a 2,500 mile tour across the continent!” What would you say to persuade or inspire other people to fundraise? “I've only ever fundraised like this a couple of times in my life - it simply must be a cause that you passionately believe in. “The Bike Project makes a really positive, visible difference to people's lives - not just for the refugees who come to the workshop and go home with what the suffragettes called 'freedom machines', but also for people like me, who come to help fix up the bikes and learn so much from both mechanics and refugees.” How can people follow your journey and donate? You can follow our journey on www.davidcharles.info or @dcisbusy on Instagram. People can donate to David here: CyclingSyria   Interested in finding out how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep A Week of Welcome: Refugee Week 2016    
    2201 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This summer David Charles and his girlfriend, Caz, are cycling an astonishing 3000 Miles across Europe, raising funds for London based refugee charity, The Bike Project. Starting in London and finishing at the town of Gaziantep on the Syria-Turkey border, this journey retraces the route taken by the thousands of refugees who have fled the war-torn country in recent years. Along the way they will be exploring how life has changed, both for refugees and also for communities living along the migration route. Localgiving recently took the chance to chat to David about his inspiration – and perspiration! What inspired you to take on this challenge? “The inspiration for this trip came directly from the volunteer work we've been doing with The Bike Project in London. The Bike Project takes second hand bikes, fixes them up and donates them to refugees so that they can travel around the city”. “Last year, we were part of a mass cycle ride to the migrant camp in Calais, donating more than 80 bikes to refugees there. That gave me the idea to cycle onwards, through France and Germany, across the Balkans to Greece and beyond, from where hundreds of thousands of people are trying to make a new life for themselves in Europe”. “I have been lucky enough in my life to be able to travel freely throughout the world, and have always received wonderful hospitality from everyone I have met, from Europe and the Americas to the Middle East and Asia. My support for charities like The Bike Project comes from a desire to return the generous hospitality that I have received to newcomers in my country, particularly to those who have been forced from their homes without the freedom of a passport and a ticket home”. What difficulties do you think you may face along the way? “The main challenges of the trip so far have been incredibly mundane: where to refill our water bottles, how to eat enough good food without spending too much money, when to stop for the night. Then yesterday I got bitten by a tick and now I'm panicking that I've got Lyme Disease! But in truth the only real challenge was committing to the ride, giving up our flats and leaving. Everything else is just logistics. What training have you done for the trip? “We both cycle a lot in London because public transport is so expensive. While I have done some bike touring before, Caz had never cycled more than 20 miles for two days in a row before this trip!” “Neither of us are what you'd call ‘serious cyclists’ - for us, it's just the easiest way of getting around. I believe that if you can cycle a mile to the shops, then you can probably cycle two and three miles. Keep turning your pedals, put those miles together and you've got a 2,500 mile tour across the continent!” What would you say to persuade or inspire other people to fundraise? “I've only ever fundraised like this a couple of times in my life - it simply must be a cause that you passionately believe in. “The Bike Project makes a really positive, visible difference to people's lives - not just for the refugees who come to the workshop and go home with what the suffragettes called 'freedom machines', but also for people like me, who come to help fix up the bikes and learn so much from both mechanics and refugees.” How can people follow your journey and donate? You can follow our journey on www.davidcharles.info or @dcisbusy on Instagram. People can donate to David here: CyclingSyria   Interested in finding out how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep A Week of Welcome: Refugee Week 2016    
    Jun 16, 2016 2201
  • 16 Jun 2016
    What could be more quintessentially British than Fish and Chips, Hampton Court and the Mini? Did you know that all of these were built, designed or brought to the UK by refugees? 20-26th June is Refugee Week - an annual celebration of the incredible contribution that refugees have made, and continue to make to our countries and communities.  This year's theme is 'welcome'. With Europe in the midst of its worst humanitarian crisis since World War II, coupled with the dangerously divisive rhetoric circulating in the UK, this has a special significance. Refugee Week is an opportunity to raise awareness, tackle stigma, energise ourselves and take action. There are hundreds of events taking place across the UK on Refugee Week, many of which are run by grassroots charities and community groups, including Localgiving members. Below are just a few. So, go get inspired! Northern Ireland Community of Asylum Seekers and Refugees (NICRAS) is hosting  a series of events throughout Refugee Week 2016 – from music to theatre to food, there’s sure to be something for you to get your teeth stuck into!  Check out their full events calendar.  Tuesday 21st June – Ourmala (London) is running an event called Yoga for Refugees . This fundraising evening includes a very special contribution from Amir Amor Soundscape (Rudimental) and Emma Henry (Yoga).  All proceeds will go towards supporting an additional 250 women and children in crisis. Tuesday 21st June - Reading Refugee Support Group is screening Nicky’s Family and hosting a panel Discussion. Nicky’s Family tells the story of Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children just before the outbreak of World War II. Wednesday 22nd June - Fences and Frontiers (London). A night of short films and discussion exploring different aspects of the refugee experience. The night is being run by Lewis (me) and Lou of Localgiving. Free to attend, this event is encouraging donations to a number of refugee groups including Ourmala and The Bike Project. Friday 24th June 2016 - The Harbour Project (Swindon) is collaborating with a host of local theatre groups, dance companies and schools to present  a one-off show: Different Pasts, Shared Future. There will also be the opportunity to view works of art by local artist David Bent. Devon and Cornwall Refugee Support - Maurice Rimes is walking England’s South West Coast Path in support of Devon and Cornwall Refugee Support. He aims to reach Plymouth at the start of Refugee week to celebrate with DCRS. You can read his blog here or donate here.    Interested in finding out more about how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep David Lets the Spokes do the talking in 3000 Mile charity Ride    
    1958 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • What could be more quintessentially British than Fish and Chips, Hampton Court and the Mini? Did you know that all of these were built, designed or brought to the UK by refugees? 20-26th June is Refugee Week - an annual celebration of the incredible contribution that refugees have made, and continue to make to our countries and communities.  This year's theme is 'welcome'. With Europe in the midst of its worst humanitarian crisis since World War II, coupled with the dangerously divisive rhetoric circulating in the UK, this has a special significance. Refugee Week is an opportunity to raise awareness, tackle stigma, energise ourselves and take action. There are hundreds of events taking place across the UK on Refugee Week, many of which are run by grassroots charities and community groups, including Localgiving members. Below are just a few. So, go get inspired! Northern Ireland Community of Asylum Seekers and Refugees (NICRAS) is hosting  a series of events throughout Refugee Week 2016 – from music to theatre to food, there’s sure to be something for you to get your teeth stuck into!  Check out their full events calendar.  Tuesday 21st June – Ourmala (London) is running an event called Yoga for Refugees . This fundraising evening includes a very special contribution from Amir Amor Soundscape (Rudimental) and Emma Henry (Yoga).  All proceeds will go towards supporting an additional 250 women and children in crisis. Tuesday 21st June - Reading Refugee Support Group is screening Nicky’s Family and hosting a panel Discussion. Nicky’s Family tells the story of Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children just before the outbreak of World War II. Wednesday 22nd June - Fences and Frontiers (London). A night of short films and discussion exploring different aspects of the refugee experience. The night is being run by Lewis (me) and Lou of Localgiving. Free to attend, this event is encouraging donations to a number of refugee groups including Ourmala and The Bike Project. Friday 24th June 2016 - The Harbour Project (Swindon) is collaborating with a host of local theatre groups, dance companies and schools to present  a one-off show: Different Pasts, Shared Future. There will also be the opportunity to view works of art by local artist David Bent. Devon and Cornwall Refugee Support - Maurice Rimes is walking England’s South West Coast Path in support of Devon and Cornwall Refugee Support. He aims to reach Plymouth at the start of Refugee week to celebrate with DCRS. You can read his blog here or donate here.    Interested in finding out more about how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep David Lets the Spokes do the talking in 3000 Mile charity Ride    
    Jun 16, 2016 1958
  • 13 Jun 2016
    Small Charity Week is here!  Over 95% of Localgiving’s members are small or micro charities.  We know better than anyone the inherent value of grassroots groups.   We are in the privileged position of hearing and seeing the positive impact that these groups make on their communities – every day in countless ways.   This morning alone I have been talking to a Darlington based group set up to save their local bowling green, a Swindon charity using theatre to change attitudes to refugees and a fans-owned football club in Scarborough. These are hugely different initiatives, with hugely different missions. What they all have in common however is an acute understanding of the needs of their communities and a genuine passion for improving the lives of those around them. Small Charity Week is about getting these small, local groups the exposure and acclaim they deserve.   So, how can you get involved? 1)      Find a small charity near you and spread the word about their cause and services.  Its easy to find a group in your area on Localgiving.org. Once you’ve found a group that inspires you, why not inspire your friends or colleagues too. Search for a Charity  2)      Donate! We’re running a #GiveMe5 match fund on Fundraising Day - Thursday the 16th June. We will be doubling 1,000 x £5 donations made through localgiving.org on the day. Our last #GiveMe5 campaign, held on Giving Tuesday 2015, raised over £36k for 548 charities in 24 hours.  Can you spare a fiver to support that inspirational group you just found? Small charities need your support. 3)      Look ahead -  Small charity week is about far more than 7 fun filled days. Think about what you can do to help grassroots charities in future. Can you offer your skills through volunteering? Could you provide ongoing financial support by setting up a direct debit? Do you know other people who would be interested in the work of the charity?   Our advice for small charity week is simple: discover, donate, and inspire!    Image (top SNAP- Special Needs and Parents, bottom  North Wilts Holiday Club for Children & Young People with Special Needs)   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    1417 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Small Charity Week is here!  Over 95% of Localgiving’s members are small or micro charities.  We know better than anyone the inherent value of grassroots groups.   We are in the privileged position of hearing and seeing the positive impact that these groups make on their communities – every day in countless ways.   This morning alone I have been talking to a Darlington based group set up to save their local bowling green, a Swindon charity using theatre to change attitudes to refugees and a fans-owned football club in Scarborough. These are hugely different initiatives, with hugely different missions. What they all have in common however is an acute understanding of the needs of their communities and a genuine passion for improving the lives of those around them. Small Charity Week is about getting these small, local groups the exposure and acclaim they deserve.   So, how can you get involved? 1)      Find a small charity near you and spread the word about their cause and services.  Its easy to find a group in your area on Localgiving.org. Once you’ve found a group that inspires you, why not inspire your friends or colleagues too. Search for a Charity  2)      Donate! We’re running a #GiveMe5 match fund on Fundraising Day - Thursday the 16th June. We will be doubling 1,000 x £5 donations made through localgiving.org on the day. Our last #GiveMe5 campaign, held on Giving Tuesday 2015, raised over £36k for 548 charities in 24 hours.  Can you spare a fiver to support that inspirational group you just found? Small charities need your support. 3)      Look ahead -  Small charity week is about far more than 7 fun filled days. Think about what you can do to help grassroots charities in future. Can you offer your skills through volunteering? Could you provide ongoing financial support by setting up a direct debit? Do you know other people who would be interested in the work of the charity?   Our advice for small charity week is simple: discover, donate, and inspire!    Image (top SNAP- Special Needs and Parents, bottom  North Wilts Holiday Club for Children & Young People with Special Needs)   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    Jun 13, 2016 1417