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270 blogs
  • 03 Dec 2015
    This Tuesday marked the UK’s second ever Giving Tuesday, and to celebrate the occasion we ran our #GiveMe5 campaign to double 1,000 x £5 donations made to local charities on the day. We're pleased to announce that the campaign was a runaway success, with more than 1,500 individuals choosing to support a local cause, raising over £36,000 for 550 local charities and community groups! In addition, we saw amazing support from a wide range of partner organisations, from leading law firms to award winning restaurants. Tasty office ‘bake offs’, front page banners on company websites, encouraging tweets and featured news stories all helped to raise awareness and support for local charities. So from everyone at Localgiving, we’d like to say a huge THANK YOU to everyone who got involved this Giving Tuesday, whether by donating, baking, tweeting or generally just shouting about local causes - every single action contributed to a fantastic result! Read more about our results and other success stories from across the UK in the Guardian.  Philanthropy in the news This week also saw CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, and his wife Priscilla Chan announce that they would be donating 99% of their Facebook shares - with a current value of $45bn - to advance a mission of “advancing human potential and promoting equality for all children in the next generation”, following the birth of their daughter. The announcement sparked a flurry of media attention around the subject of philanthropy, with our founder, Marcelle Speller, adding her expertise to the discussion. See a video of Marcelle talking to John Humprys about philanthropy and the importance of local charities on Radio 4’s the Today Programme here. With special thanks to the Office for Civil Society for providing funding for our #GiveMe5 campaign this #GivingTuesday
    1835 Posted by Lou Coady
  • This Tuesday marked the UK’s second ever Giving Tuesday, and to celebrate the occasion we ran our #GiveMe5 campaign to double 1,000 x £5 donations made to local charities on the day. We're pleased to announce that the campaign was a runaway success, with more than 1,500 individuals choosing to support a local cause, raising over £36,000 for 550 local charities and community groups! In addition, we saw amazing support from a wide range of partner organisations, from leading law firms to award winning restaurants. Tasty office ‘bake offs’, front page banners on company websites, encouraging tweets and featured news stories all helped to raise awareness and support for local charities. So from everyone at Localgiving, we’d like to say a huge THANK YOU to everyone who got involved this Giving Tuesday, whether by donating, baking, tweeting or generally just shouting about local causes - every single action contributed to a fantastic result! Read more about our results and other success stories from across the UK in the Guardian.  Philanthropy in the news This week also saw CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, and his wife Priscilla Chan announce that they would be donating 99% of their Facebook shares - with a current value of $45bn - to advance a mission of “advancing human potential and promoting equality for all children in the next generation”, following the birth of their daughter. The announcement sparked a flurry of media attention around the subject of philanthropy, with our founder, Marcelle Speller, adding her expertise to the discussion. See a video of Marcelle talking to John Humprys about philanthropy and the importance of local charities on Radio 4’s the Today Programme here. With special thanks to the Office for Civil Society for providing funding for our #GiveMe5 campaign this #GivingTuesday
    Dec 03, 2015 1835
  • 02 Dec 2015
    On 8th December we will be launching our Christmas Top 40 appeal campaign, so this is the perfect opportunity for your group to create your first appeal page! How to create an appeal page Appeal pages work in a similar way to fundraising pages. They include target bars and the facility for your supporters to leave comments. Funds raised through these pages are defined within your reports, making tracking your donations quick and simple. Please click here for our 'How to create an Appeal page' resource with an easy step-by-step guide to help you set up your first appeal.   How to run a successful appeal campaign You can also click here for our 13 tips for running a successful appeal which takes you through everything from making your ask to thanking your supporters.   Christmas Top 40 campaign Our Christmas Top 40 campaign will be running between 8th December and 8th January and we will be awarding £100 to the first 40 groups to raise £100 through a Localgiving Appeal page. In addition to 40 prizes of £100, the appeal to raise the most money between the campaign start and end dates will win our bonus Top Spot Prize of £1,000! So, even if you aren’t ready to set up your page from the 8th December, you could still win the top prize over the month that the campaign is running. Please click here for our more information about the campaign.  Contact Us If you have any further questions or need any assitance please give us a call on 0300 111 2340 or email us on help@localgiving.com.
    1750 Posted by Fergus Simpson
  • On 8th December we will be launching our Christmas Top 40 appeal campaign, so this is the perfect opportunity for your group to create your first appeal page! How to create an appeal page Appeal pages work in a similar way to fundraising pages. They include target bars and the facility for your supporters to leave comments. Funds raised through these pages are defined within your reports, making tracking your donations quick and simple. Please click here for our 'How to create an Appeal page' resource with an easy step-by-step guide to help you set up your first appeal.   How to run a successful appeal campaign You can also click here for our 13 tips for running a successful appeal which takes you through everything from making your ask to thanking your supporters.   Christmas Top 40 campaign Our Christmas Top 40 campaign will be running between 8th December and 8th January and we will be awarding £100 to the first 40 groups to raise £100 through a Localgiving Appeal page. In addition to 40 prizes of £100, the appeal to raise the most money between the campaign start and end dates will win our bonus Top Spot Prize of £1,000! So, even if you aren’t ready to set up your page from the 8th December, you could still win the top prize over the month that the campaign is running. Please click here for our more information about the campaign.  Contact Us If you have any further questions or need any assitance please give us a call on 0300 111 2340 or email us on help@localgiving.com.
    Dec 02, 2015 1750
  • 30 Nov 2015
    Zoe Amar is Director of Zoe Amar Communications. She also writes for The Guardian Voluntary Sector Network about charities and digital marketing. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are amongst the biggest social networks, and your charity may well have a presence on them, however nascent. Their one downside is that they are now very crowded marketplaces. To stand out on Facebook you will have to invest in ads, which many small, local charities may not have the budget for. Whilst it’s vital to maintain a presence on global networks, the answer to true engagement may lie closer to home in hyperlocal social media. Hyperlocal sites, which are focused on targeted geographic segments, such as Birmingham Updates or Sheffield Forum, are a perfect fit for small charities. According to a recent report by Cardiff University and Nesta, there are more than 400 active hyperlocal websites in the UK, compared with 1,045 local papers. 17 per cent of people online in the UK visit hyperlocal websites or apps every week for news about their local area or community, and Ofcom have noted that this trend is set to rise. Such sites are most likely to cover community activities e.g. festivals, clubs and societies, local councils and the services they provide, but some feature investigative journalism about local news. Those aged 35-44 are more likely to have used hyperlocal. With all that in mind, more charities should tap into the power of hyperlocal. Anecdotally, hyperlocal sites are often the first place people look when they want to find out what is going on in their community, and Nesta reports that community events, services, local weather and traffic are the most popular content types. So how can small, local charities use these sites to build relationships with their local communities? 1. Understand your audience. Talk to people in your audience and find out where they get their information about what’s going on in your area. Is it the local paper? Or is there a blog for your area? Or a local mums’ group on Facebook? Establish where conversations are taking place and then join these forums to see what people are talking about. 2. Get to know the people behind the sites. Find out who runs your favourite hyperlocal sites. Like you, they are likely to be passionate about the place you live in and want to bring people together. Build a relationship with them and they will be much more likely to publicise what you do. 3. Look at how your charity could add value. As someone who’s advised many charities about how to use hyperlocal, I don’t recommend joining sites and broadcasting about your events or campaigns. Take time to understand how you can add value. For example, suppose you are organising a coffee morning. Give people a reason to come along as well as supporting a great cause, such as that it’s a nice rainy day activity for mums with children. This will help you establish a long term relationship. 4. Have a clear ask. How can your community help you? Do you want them to donate, volunteer, or use your services? Make sure you have a strong call to action and a good reason for people to take it. If your charity wants to campaign, fundraise or build a community around your brand in your community then hyperlocal could help you go a long way.   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroHow to make friend with the media by Kay Parris    
    3048 Posted by Zoe Amar
  • Zoe Amar is Director of Zoe Amar Communications. She also writes for The Guardian Voluntary Sector Network about charities and digital marketing. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are amongst the biggest social networks, and your charity may well have a presence on them, however nascent. Their one downside is that they are now very crowded marketplaces. To stand out on Facebook you will have to invest in ads, which many small, local charities may not have the budget for. Whilst it’s vital to maintain a presence on global networks, the answer to true engagement may lie closer to home in hyperlocal social media. Hyperlocal sites, which are focused on targeted geographic segments, such as Birmingham Updates or Sheffield Forum, are a perfect fit for small charities. According to a recent report by Cardiff University and Nesta, there are more than 400 active hyperlocal websites in the UK, compared with 1,045 local papers. 17 per cent of people online in the UK visit hyperlocal websites or apps every week for news about their local area or community, and Ofcom have noted that this trend is set to rise. Such sites are most likely to cover community activities e.g. festivals, clubs and societies, local councils and the services they provide, but some feature investigative journalism about local news. Those aged 35-44 are more likely to have used hyperlocal. With all that in mind, more charities should tap into the power of hyperlocal. Anecdotally, hyperlocal sites are often the first place people look when they want to find out what is going on in their community, and Nesta reports that community events, services, local weather and traffic are the most popular content types. So how can small, local charities use these sites to build relationships with their local communities? 1. Understand your audience. Talk to people in your audience and find out where they get their information about what’s going on in your area. Is it the local paper? Or is there a blog for your area? Or a local mums’ group on Facebook? Establish where conversations are taking place and then join these forums to see what people are talking about. 2. Get to know the people behind the sites. Find out who runs your favourite hyperlocal sites. Like you, they are likely to be passionate about the place you live in and want to bring people together. Build a relationship with them and they will be much more likely to publicise what you do. 3. Look at how your charity could add value. As someone who’s advised many charities about how to use hyperlocal, I don’t recommend joining sites and broadcasting about your events or campaigns. Take time to understand how you can add value. For example, suppose you are organising a coffee morning. Give people a reason to come along as well as supporting a great cause, such as that it’s a nice rainy day activity for mums with children. This will help you establish a long term relationship. 4. Have a clear ask. How can your community help you? Do you want them to donate, volunteer, or use your services? Make sure you have a strong call to action and a good reason for people to take it. If your charity wants to campaign, fundraise or build a community around your brand in your community then hyperlocal could help you go a long way.   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroHow to make friend with the media by Kay Parris    
    Nov 30, 2015 3048
  • 30 Nov 2015
    Partnerships between local charities, businesses and larger organisations can have mutual benefits for all parties involved, but many local groups tell us they have a hard time making these partnerships a reality. Networking and finding the right people to engage with is crucial - whether your organisation is looking to secure extra funding, co-operate on service delivery or even pool resources.  Have you ever been asked for a specific name when phoning an organisation, rather than being able to be put through to a department, or a secretary of a Manager? It was something I constantly encountered and fell foul of working in my first Business Development job, before I discovered Linkedin. Now it’s a piece of cake to find out exactly who I need to speak to within a department of a company. I’ve even found tricks to use Linkedin for more than just searching for a name. There’s a kind of art to using the social media site and a respectability within business, which allows us to use it for networking. In this blog I’m going to share some of my Linkedin tricks, so you and your group can also benefit. I should start off by saying, that not everyone needs a Premium, paid for account, to make the most of Linkedin. Actually, very few people do. Despite what looks like an all singing all dancing resource, for many small charities and community groups with limited finances, a standard account will more than do. 1. Numbers count  One of the useful things to look for in a well networked contact is the number of connections they have. This will always show as “500+” on their profile, if you’re not connected. Connecting with these people can give you access to a huge range of people with expertise and knowledge that can really benefit your group. 2. Building your network  Connecting with one individual enables you to easily link with their colleagues, board members and other people with a close relationship to that company. Once you have this initial contact all of these other people become “2nd degree contacts”. As a result, you end up getting a branching effect, that after a while turns into a much wider network. 3. The higher the better? It is worth noting that the most senior members of an organisation are not always the decision makers. However, being linked to a Chairman, or CEO means you’re far more likely to be accepted as a Connection by those who are. 4. Board members are frequently members of multiple boards Linkedin can also be useful for approaching those senior members of an organisation. Establishing these links makes it far easier to ask them to support your cause, financially or otherwise at a later date. Board members are frequently members of multiple boards. Linking with these individuals will therefore give you access to numerous useful contacts across different organisations. 5. Groups Another excellent way to build your network, is to join relevant groups. In my experience, once you are in a group, speculative requests to connect are far more positively received. Moreover, using your group as a means to publish posts is a great way to become better known. 6. The all important Profile This brings me onto your profile itself. People will want to see if you could be a valuable connection to them. For this reason it's advisable to use the mantra of - if you wouldn’t put it on your CV, don’t put it on your profile. The same goes for your picture. Make it professional and explain what you’ve done in other roles, rather than just listing them. While I wouldn’t advocate putting every job you’ve ever had on your profile, a wide range of roles does help to link you to others. For some 2nd degree contacts and other wider contacts, your “Done Business With” drop down tab will allow you to send an invitation. 7. Sharing works for everyone One of the areas people often feel hesitant about is adding a connection who could be considered competition, be it for funding or clients. Don’t be! Generally speaking, while they will have access to your connections, you will also have access to theirs and that could be very valuable. Particularly in the charitable and voluntary sector, people often share knowledge. A partnership that could be useful to you, may already have been developed by a competitor who couldn’t make use of it themselves. Information sharing is useful to all of us. Of course all of this comes with a very large caveat that a partnership can never be purely online. What Linkedin does best is let you know a little about the person you want to speak to. Even if you’re simply looking up a job title on Google, putting in Linkedin at the end of your search could really help. Sometimes my first point of call is simply to search for a company in a geographical area to get an understanding of its structure and personnel. However you use Linkedin, it is a great thing to have in your networking armoury.
    1478 Posted by Katie Ford
  • Partnerships between local charities, businesses and larger organisations can have mutual benefits for all parties involved, but many local groups tell us they have a hard time making these partnerships a reality. Networking and finding the right people to engage with is crucial - whether your organisation is looking to secure extra funding, co-operate on service delivery or even pool resources.  Have you ever been asked for a specific name when phoning an organisation, rather than being able to be put through to a department, or a secretary of a Manager? It was something I constantly encountered and fell foul of working in my first Business Development job, before I discovered Linkedin. Now it’s a piece of cake to find out exactly who I need to speak to within a department of a company. I’ve even found tricks to use Linkedin for more than just searching for a name. There’s a kind of art to using the social media site and a respectability within business, which allows us to use it for networking. In this blog I’m going to share some of my Linkedin tricks, so you and your group can also benefit. I should start off by saying, that not everyone needs a Premium, paid for account, to make the most of Linkedin. Actually, very few people do. Despite what looks like an all singing all dancing resource, for many small charities and community groups with limited finances, a standard account will more than do. 1. Numbers count  One of the useful things to look for in a well networked contact is the number of connections they have. This will always show as “500+” on their profile, if you’re not connected. Connecting with these people can give you access to a huge range of people with expertise and knowledge that can really benefit your group. 2. Building your network  Connecting with one individual enables you to easily link with their colleagues, board members and other people with a close relationship to that company. Once you have this initial contact all of these other people become “2nd degree contacts”. As a result, you end up getting a branching effect, that after a while turns into a much wider network. 3. The higher the better? It is worth noting that the most senior members of an organisation are not always the decision makers. However, being linked to a Chairman, or CEO means you’re far more likely to be accepted as a Connection by those who are. 4. Board members are frequently members of multiple boards Linkedin can also be useful for approaching those senior members of an organisation. Establishing these links makes it far easier to ask them to support your cause, financially or otherwise at a later date. Board members are frequently members of multiple boards. Linking with these individuals will therefore give you access to numerous useful contacts across different organisations. 5. Groups Another excellent way to build your network, is to join relevant groups. In my experience, once you are in a group, speculative requests to connect are far more positively received. Moreover, using your group as a means to publish posts is a great way to become better known. 6. The all important Profile This brings me onto your profile itself. People will want to see if you could be a valuable connection to them. For this reason it's advisable to use the mantra of - if you wouldn’t put it on your CV, don’t put it on your profile. The same goes for your picture. Make it professional and explain what you’ve done in other roles, rather than just listing them. While I wouldn’t advocate putting every job you’ve ever had on your profile, a wide range of roles does help to link you to others. For some 2nd degree contacts and other wider contacts, your “Done Business With” drop down tab will allow you to send an invitation. 7. Sharing works for everyone One of the areas people often feel hesitant about is adding a connection who could be considered competition, be it for funding or clients. Don’t be! Generally speaking, while they will have access to your connections, you will also have access to theirs and that could be very valuable. Particularly in the charitable and voluntary sector, people often share knowledge. A partnership that could be useful to you, may already have been developed by a competitor who couldn’t make use of it themselves. Information sharing is useful to all of us. Of course all of this comes with a very large caveat that a partnership can never be purely online. What Linkedin does best is let you know a little about the person you want to speak to. Even if you’re simply looking up a job title on Google, putting in Linkedin at the end of your search could really help. Sometimes my first point of call is simply to search for a company in a geographical area to get an understanding of its structure and personnel. However you use Linkedin, it is a great thing to have in your networking armoury.
    Nov 30, 2015 1478
  • 25 Nov 2015
    Between 22nd November and 22nd December we are celebrating UK Disability History Month. This month highlights the contribution and achievements of disabled people in the UK and raises awareness of the continued unequal position of disabled people in society. Local disability charities and community groups are at the very heart of the movement to create a more equal society and world for disabled people. Local disability groups are often user-led (DPULOs) and have highly specialist knowledge of their cause, their beneficiaries and of the facilities and issues in their communities. Localgiving’s recent Local charity and Community Group Sustainability Report found that 13% of local charities in the UK specialise in 'disability' with another 14% focussing on 'health and wellbeing'. Together, that represents over a quarter of the UK’s local charities. The UK disability sector is hugely diverse - services range from advice and advocacy to campaigning to running specialist projects such as buddy schemes. Why not find out what groups there are in your area? It's easier than you think to get involved, volunteer, fundraise or donate. You may have the very skills a local group is looking for. To give you some help, here are just some of the amazing charities that we work with every day: Spider- Y (Yorkshire) Ability Dogs 4 Young People IOW (Isle of Wight) Twinkle House (Manchester) Wisp dance club (Wrexham) WinVisible (London) Muffins Dream Team (Hampshire) Staffordshire Therapeutic Independent Neurological Group STING (Staffordshire) Sports Driving Unlimited (Dumfries & Galloway) Dingley Family and Specialist Early Years Centres (Reading) CoDa Dance Company (Surrey) Diverse Abilities Plus (Dorset) Rock Foundation (Lincolnshire) Autism Angels (North Yorkshire) Glenshane Care Association (Londonderry/Derry)   There are many, many more groups working tirelessly all across the country – to find a group near you click HERE. December 3rd is International Day of Disabled Persons- That’s just two days after #GivingTuesday. What better time to make your donation go that bit further? Images: Top left- Sports Driving Ltd, Right- STING   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro    
    1433 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Between 22nd November and 22nd December we are celebrating UK Disability History Month. This month highlights the contribution and achievements of disabled people in the UK and raises awareness of the continued unequal position of disabled people in society. Local disability charities and community groups are at the very heart of the movement to create a more equal society and world for disabled people. Local disability groups are often user-led (DPULOs) and have highly specialist knowledge of their cause, their beneficiaries and of the facilities and issues in their communities. Localgiving’s recent Local charity and Community Group Sustainability Report found that 13% of local charities in the UK specialise in 'disability' with another 14% focussing on 'health and wellbeing'. Together, that represents over a quarter of the UK’s local charities. The UK disability sector is hugely diverse - services range from advice and advocacy to campaigning to running specialist projects such as buddy schemes. Why not find out what groups there are in your area? It's easier than you think to get involved, volunteer, fundraise or donate. You may have the very skills a local group is looking for. To give you some help, here are just some of the amazing charities that we work with every day: Spider- Y (Yorkshire) Ability Dogs 4 Young People IOW (Isle of Wight) Twinkle House (Manchester) Wisp dance club (Wrexham) WinVisible (London) Muffins Dream Team (Hampshire) Staffordshire Therapeutic Independent Neurological Group STING (Staffordshire) Sports Driving Unlimited (Dumfries & Galloway) Dingley Family and Specialist Early Years Centres (Reading) CoDa Dance Company (Surrey) Diverse Abilities Plus (Dorset) Rock Foundation (Lincolnshire) Autism Angels (North Yorkshire) Glenshane Care Association (Londonderry/Derry)   There are many, many more groups working tirelessly all across the country – to find a group near you click HERE. December 3rd is International Day of Disabled Persons- That’s just two days after #GivingTuesday. What better time to make your donation go that bit further? Images: Top left- Sports Driving Ltd, Right- STING   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro    
    Nov 25, 2015 1433
  • 20 Nov 2015
    Andy is Head of Business Development at charity recruitment specialists Prospectus. A member of the Senior Leadership Team, Andy works closely with the CEO and Directors on business development, operational projects, marketing and maintaining and developing client relationships. He has also project managed some of the more innovative schemes that Prospectus is involved with, such as the Beyond Profit Internship scheme and their role in the Do-it partnership. Entries are now open for the inaugural Charity Governance Awards – the new UK awards that recognise and reward good charity governance. The awards are being organised and funded by The Clothworkers’ Company, a City Livery company that supports trusteeship initiatives, and supported by New Philanthropy Capital, Prospectus and Reach. Award categories The Charity Governance Awards are free to enter and will shine a spotlight on the best of the sector. All the partners are keen to  use these awards to significantly “raise the bar” of governance to ensure higher standards of quality, outputs and outcomes. The award categories are: Improving impact - charities with 3 paid staff or fewer (including charities with no paid staff) Improving impact - charities with 4–25 paid staff Improving impact - charities with 26 paid staff or more Board diversity & inclusivity Managing turnaround Embracing opportunity & harnessing risk  How to enter The awards are easy to enter online, with six categories covering every kind of charitable organisation. There’s no expensive entry fee or gala dinner tickets to pay for. It’s simply a no-charge opportunity to share your charity’s work and win £5,000 to help you do more of it. The deadline for entries is Friday 15th January 2016 and short-listed entrants will also get a complimentary invitation to the awards event in London on 12th May 2016, where the winners will be announced. Entries from small and regional organisations are particularly encouraged and for any organisation that is shortlisted and has a turnover is less than £500,000 The Clothworkers’ Company will cover the rail fares to enable you to be represented on the night. Find out more You can find out more about The Charity Governance Awards, including more details on categories and the entry process here and follow the action via #charitygov16. Prospectus is a specialist recruitment consultancy and recruitment advertising and design agency working exclusively with the beyond profit sector and proud to be a key partner in the inaugural Charity Governance Awards.      
    1717 Posted by Andy Tonnor
  • Andy is Head of Business Development at charity recruitment specialists Prospectus. A member of the Senior Leadership Team, Andy works closely with the CEO and Directors on business development, operational projects, marketing and maintaining and developing client relationships. He has also project managed some of the more innovative schemes that Prospectus is involved with, such as the Beyond Profit Internship scheme and their role in the Do-it partnership. Entries are now open for the inaugural Charity Governance Awards – the new UK awards that recognise and reward good charity governance. The awards are being organised and funded by The Clothworkers’ Company, a City Livery company that supports trusteeship initiatives, and supported by New Philanthropy Capital, Prospectus and Reach. Award categories The Charity Governance Awards are free to enter and will shine a spotlight on the best of the sector. All the partners are keen to  use these awards to significantly “raise the bar” of governance to ensure higher standards of quality, outputs and outcomes. The award categories are: Improving impact - charities with 3 paid staff or fewer (including charities with no paid staff) Improving impact - charities with 4–25 paid staff Improving impact - charities with 26 paid staff or more Board diversity & inclusivity Managing turnaround Embracing opportunity & harnessing risk  How to enter The awards are easy to enter online, with six categories covering every kind of charitable organisation. There’s no expensive entry fee or gala dinner tickets to pay for. It’s simply a no-charge opportunity to share your charity’s work and win £5,000 to help you do more of it. The deadline for entries is Friday 15th January 2016 and short-listed entrants will also get a complimentary invitation to the awards event in London on 12th May 2016, where the winners will be announced. Entries from small and regional organisations are particularly encouraged and for any organisation that is shortlisted and has a turnover is less than £500,000 The Clothworkers’ Company will cover the rail fares to enable you to be represented on the night. Find out more You can find out more about The Charity Governance Awards, including more details on categories and the entry process here and follow the action via #charitygov16. Prospectus is a specialist recruitment consultancy and recruitment advertising and design agency working exclusively with the beyond profit sector and proud to be a key partner in the inaugural Charity Governance Awards.      
    Nov 20, 2015 1717
  • 18 Nov 2015
    With #GivingTuesday just around the corner, there’s no better time to get your social media pages up to date and to make it simpler for your supporters to donate! One really useful recent update made by Facebook allows you to add a free “Donate Now” button to the top of your organisation’s Facebook page. By linking the button to your Localgiving donation page, you can make it easier for supporters to give. To help you benefit from this, we thought we’d give you a little advice on how to get started. Firstly, you need to make sure that your Facebook page is set up under the category “non-profit organization”. If your page is currently set up as something else, you can change its category by following this quick guide from Facebook. To add the “Donate Now” Button just follow these simple instructions: 1) Go to your Page’s cover photo and click “Create Call to Action”. 2) This will give you a list of possible “Call to Action” buttons. Scroll through these buttons and choose “Donate Now”.                3) Below this list you will see a box with the title “Website”. This is where you need to add the URL of your Localgiving page. We recommend that you add your donation page URL here. This way your donors will only be one click away from donating! To find your Donation Page URL first open your Localgiving page in a new tab and then click on the “Donate Now” button at the top right of the page.                                                                                                                                                             When you are on this page simply copy the URL in the address bar.     Then paste the URL into the box titled “Website”.   4) Once your URL is written in this box, all you need to do is click “Create” and, Voila, your “Donate Now” Button will be live!     Once your “Donate Button” is active you can even find out how many people have clicked on it. Just click on the button, hover over “view Insights” and you will see a graph showing how many people have clicked on each of the last 7 days.So, now you are fully equipped with a shiny new “Donate Now” Button – it’s time to tell your supporters. Why not encourage them to donate £5 through Facebook on December 1st as part of our #GiveMe5 match fund campaign!   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina   5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha   How to make friend with the media by Kay Parris Get your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield    
    3250 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • With #GivingTuesday just around the corner, there’s no better time to get your social media pages up to date and to make it simpler for your supporters to donate! One really useful recent update made by Facebook allows you to add a free “Donate Now” button to the top of your organisation’s Facebook page. By linking the button to your Localgiving donation page, you can make it easier for supporters to give. To help you benefit from this, we thought we’d give you a little advice on how to get started. Firstly, you need to make sure that your Facebook page is set up under the category “non-profit organization”. If your page is currently set up as something else, you can change its category by following this quick guide from Facebook. To add the “Donate Now” Button just follow these simple instructions: 1) Go to your Page’s cover photo and click “Create Call to Action”. 2) This will give you a list of possible “Call to Action” buttons. Scroll through these buttons and choose “Donate Now”.                3) Below this list you will see a box with the title “Website”. This is where you need to add the URL of your Localgiving page. We recommend that you add your donation page URL here. This way your donors will only be one click away from donating! To find your Donation Page URL first open your Localgiving page in a new tab and then click on the “Donate Now” button at the top right of the page.                                                                                                                                                             When you are on this page simply copy the URL in the address bar.     Then paste the URL into the box titled “Website”.   4) Once your URL is written in this box, all you need to do is click “Create” and, Voila, your “Donate Now” Button will be live!     Once your “Donate Button” is active you can even find out how many people have clicked on it. Just click on the button, hover over “view Insights” and you will see a graph showing how many people have clicked on each of the last 7 days.So, now you are fully equipped with a shiny new “Donate Now” Button – it’s time to tell your supporters. Why not encourage them to donate £5 through Facebook on December 1st as part of our #GiveMe5 match fund campaign!   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina   5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha   How to make friend with the media by Kay Parris Get your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield    
    Nov 18, 2015 3250
  • 16 Nov 2015
    Will Knock is Operations Manager at Diversity Role Models, a national homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying charity. This week (16-20 November) is Anti-Bullying Week, which is a key moment in the year for Diversity Role Models. We deliver pupil workshops and teacher training in schools to tackle the root causes of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying. This year for Anti-Bullying Week, we’ve launched a new fundraising campaign. But creating an engaging campaign is a challenge for small charities like us. We don’t have dedicated marketers, we don’t have a huge budget, and we can only commit limited staff time to it. So here are the three key questions that we asked ourselves and found helped us to build our campaign without spending too much money or time. What content can you reuse or repurpose? It would be amazing to create lots of new multimedia content for a campaign, but it’s often not possible. So we began by asking what we could repurpose. This helped us identify three professionally-produced videos of our volunteer role models telling their stories that we’ve recently completed for a different project. Using stories like Ryan’s adds emotional weight to our campaign and gives us something to build it around. Most small charities have great existing content. Think about what you already have as a quick, cheap and easy way to start building a campaign. What new content can you easily create? Reusing content is great, but it still helps to have new content for a campaign. It doesn’t have to take hours or money to produce; there’s lots that can be produced quickly. For our campaign, we’ve taken supportive quotes from our patrons and turned them into quote pictures using a tool behappy.me. It’s a quick way to create new content that can be shared. How can you use social media effectively? Using social media effectively helps extend the reach of a campaign. But it does take some forethought. We started with our patrons, who have far more followers than us. So think about who could usefully share your campaign and ask them in advance. Be as specific as possible, including writing a suggested tweet and when you’d like them to post it. We also wanted to help donors engage beyond just giving money. We put in place a simple mechanism for them to leave their messages of support, which we’ll be sharing on social media all week. The aim of all this is to create a buzz on social media, get people sharing what’s going on and inspire them to be part of it. Learn from what you do So those are just a few thoughts of what we’ve found helpful in getting ready for this week’s campaign. Some of it will work, some of it might not. When the campaign’s over, we’ll be sure to evaluate it. That way we’ll be able to identify what worked and what didn’t. We’ll repeat what worked, and for the rest we’ll keep experimenting until we find something that does. You can find out more about Diversity Role Models on their website, where you’ll also find their Anti-Bullying Week campaign page.   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroBig Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge    
    1447 Posted by Will Knock
  • Will Knock is Operations Manager at Diversity Role Models, a national homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying charity. This week (16-20 November) is Anti-Bullying Week, which is a key moment in the year for Diversity Role Models. We deliver pupil workshops and teacher training in schools to tackle the root causes of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying. This year for Anti-Bullying Week, we’ve launched a new fundraising campaign. But creating an engaging campaign is a challenge for small charities like us. We don’t have dedicated marketers, we don’t have a huge budget, and we can only commit limited staff time to it. So here are the three key questions that we asked ourselves and found helped us to build our campaign without spending too much money or time. What content can you reuse or repurpose? It would be amazing to create lots of new multimedia content for a campaign, but it’s often not possible. So we began by asking what we could repurpose. This helped us identify three professionally-produced videos of our volunteer role models telling their stories that we’ve recently completed for a different project. Using stories like Ryan’s adds emotional weight to our campaign and gives us something to build it around. Most small charities have great existing content. Think about what you already have as a quick, cheap and easy way to start building a campaign. What new content can you easily create? Reusing content is great, but it still helps to have new content for a campaign. It doesn’t have to take hours or money to produce; there’s lots that can be produced quickly. For our campaign, we’ve taken supportive quotes from our patrons and turned them into quote pictures using a tool behappy.me. It’s a quick way to create new content that can be shared. How can you use social media effectively? Using social media effectively helps extend the reach of a campaign. But it does take some forethought. We started with our patrons, who have far more followers than us. So think about who could usefully share your campaign and ask them in advance. Be as specific as possible, including writing a suggested tweet and when you’d like them to post it. We also wanted to help donors engage beyond just giving money. We put in place a simple mechanism for them to leave their messages of support, which we’ll be sharing on social media all week. The aim of all this is to create a buzz on social media, get people sharing what’s going on and inspire them to be part of it. Learn from what you do So those are just a few thoughts of what we’ve found helpful in getting ready for this week’s campaign. Some of it will work, some of it might not. When the campaign’s over, we’ll be sure to evaluate it. That way we’ll be able to identify what worked and what didn’t. We’ll repeat what worked, and for the rest we’ll keep experimenting until we find something that does. You can find out more about Diversity Role Models on their website, where you’ll also find their Anti-Bullying Week campaign page.   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroBig Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge    
    Nov 16, 2015 1447
  • 10 Nov 2015
    There is a real sense of excitement when you see donations being made to local groups, especially when you have the connection with them to know the impact those donations will have – whether that’s the ability to pay for new uniforms for staff, helping to pay the rent on their building or paying for a training programme. Our September Match-fund was particularly exciting for me because it was the first campaign I have been involved in since taking up the post of Localgiving Coordinator in Northern  Ireland. For some groups, this was the first time they had ever fundraised online, while others were seasoned pros. In all cases, the enthusiasm was palpable. To those organisations hesitant about online fundraising, here are my top myth-busting pieces of advice: You don’t need masses of time to fundraise online We provide you with as many resources and all the support you need to get started.One thing we know for sure – groups do not need more work when they are already busy with service provision -doing what they do best! That’s why Localgiving try to make it as simple as possible for our members. St John Bosco Community Association told us that we made it “simple and easy” and there was no extra workload for them! That’s our aim! You don’t need your own specific campaign Although it can help improve your reach, we can work through ideas with you.  One of the main benefits of the match fund opportunity is that it gives organisations and groups a ready-made campaign to connect in to and it changes the narrative of their fundraising asks. Some groups said they feel hesitant in asking their supporters for donations unless it was for a specific issue or project. We heard from An Droichead that the campaign helped them to focus on their financial capabilities and really motivated their staff and volunteers to get involved in the fundraising effort. You don’t need to be a big charity to benefit Some groups are solely volunteer led and most work within small communities.  Northern Ireland Children’s Enterprise told us of their surprise at how easy it was for small organisations to get donations - ‘normally you associate online fundraising with big national charities but it was so well organised that small organisations like us were able to get involved’. You don’t need to be a techy whizz Whether you’re a digi-dynamo or tech-trainee, anyone can get involved with online fundraising. Localgiving work with groups with a wide spectrum of technological abilities. One of our aims is to increase confidence and capabilities among our members when it comes to using technology, digital media and our own website. This will increase the reach of your group and hopefully increase the amount of donations coming your way! Getting to know and understand the work you and other local groups across Northern Ireland are doing has been truly inspiring. I am excited about supporting you in future, particularly helping you improve your fundraising capabilities, enabling you to do what you do best, even better!             Found this blog post useful? You may also like:   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha Get your charity’s voice heard by Duncan HatfieldDon’t save you Pitch for the Elevator by Emma Beeston   Both images are courtesy of Northern Ireland Children's Enterprise
    1584 Posted by Sian O'Neill
  • There is a real sense of excitement when you see donations being made to local groups, especially when you have the connection with them to know the impact those donations will have – whether that’s the ability to pay for new uniforms for staff, helping to pay the rent on their building or paying for a training programme. Our September Match-fund was particularly exciting for me because it was the first campaign I have been involved in since taking up the post of Localgiving Coordinator in Northern  Ireland. For some groups, this was the first time they had ever fundraised online, while others were seasoned pros. In all cases, the enthusiasm was palpable. To those organisations hesitant about online fundraising, here are my top myth-busting pieces of advice: You don’t need masses of time to fundraise online We provide you with as many resources and all the support you need to get started.One thing we know for sure – groups do not need more work when they are already busy with service provision -doing what they do best! That’s why Localgiving try to make it as simple as possible for our members. St John Bosco Community Association told us that we made it “simple and easy” and there was no extra workload for them! That’s our aim! You don’t need your own specific campaign Although it can help improve your reach, we can work through ideas with you.  One of the main benefits of the match fund opportunity is that it gives organisations and groups a ready-made campaign to connect in to and it changes the narrative of their fundraising asks. Some groups said they feel hesitant in asking their supporters for donations unless it was for a specific issue or project. We heard from An Droichead that the campaign helped them to focus on their financial capabilities and really motivated their staff and volunteers to get involved in the fundraising effort. You don’t need to be a big charity to benefit Some groups are solely volunteer led and most work within small communities.  Northern Ireland Children’s Enterprise told us of their surprise at how easy it was for small organisations to get donations - ‘normally you associate online fundraising with big national charities but it was so well organised that small organisations like us were able to get involved’. You don’t need to be a techy whizz Whether you’re a digi-dynamo or tech-trainee, anyone can get involved with online fundraising. Localgiving work with groups with a wide spectrum of technological abilities. One of our aims is to increase confidence and capabilities among our members when it comes to using technology, digital media and our own website. This will increase the reach of your group and hopefully increase the amount of donations coming your way! Getting to know and understand the work you and other local groups across Northern Ireland are doing has been truly inspiring. I am excited about supporting you in future, particularly helping you improve your fundraising capabilities, enabling you to do what you do best, even better!             Found this blog post useful? You may also like:   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha Get your charity’s voice heard by Duncan HatfieldDon’t save you Pitch for the Elevator by Emma Beeston   Both images are courtesy of Northern Ireland Children's Enterprise
    Nov 10, 2015 1584
  • 09 Nov 2015
    With only three weeks to go until #GivingTuesday, now is the time to decide which groups or causes your company are supporting and, importantly, to dust off those fancy dress costumes stuffed behind the resource cupboard! #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving. It is about showing that you care about important causes and about your local community. It is also about getting involved and having fun! Having started in the U.S in 2012, this worldwide phenomenon aims to utilise the power of social media to bring about real change. This movement brings people together across diverse sectors of society to celebrate and encourage charitable giving. Why you should get involved? Last year Localgiving raised an incredible £55,000 through public donations and had an amazing time doing it. This year we really want our corporate partners to share in this experience.  With a little bit of effort and a big dose of fun, together we can raise awareness and money for local charities across the UK. Where should we start? On December the 1st Localgiving are running a campaign called #GiveMe5. We are pledging to double 1,000 x £5 donations made on the day. As a business you can use your corporate profile and image to support local charities and causes you care about.  You can add your logo to our list of partners, HERE.  In doing so you will pledge to promote #GiveMe5 on #GivingTuesday. Encourage your staff to get involved and to use social media to promote the charity they’re supporting via our #GiveMe5 campaign. If you or your staff haven’t yet chosen a charity, you can easily find a group in your local area HERE. We literally want to see a show of hands!  Show who you’re supporting on #GivingTuesday with a  #GiveMe5 selfie - let your friends, clients, local community and the world know you care about local charities. What can we do in the office on the day? Here are just a few ideas for what you and your office can do to raise money through #GiveMe5 on December 1st 2015. Donate an hour Each staff member can donate the equivalent of one hour’s salary to a local charity through #GiveMe5. If your hour’s salary is £15 then you can make 3 x £5 donations to a charity of your choice. Give up and donate Can’t do without your daily cappuccino, croissant or crisps? Give up an item for 5 days and donate what you would have spent to a local charity. Remember to round up to the nearest £5 to ensure your donation is included in #GiveMe5! Feed your office; let them know it's Giving Time! Ask all of your employees to bring in one dish for an extended lunch or evening party. Each member of staff then donates £5 (the average price of lunch) to a local charity on Localgiving through #GiveMe5 The Giveaway SELL, SELL, SELL!! Encourage your employees to sell things they don’t need any more online for £5 and donate the money to a local charity on Localgiving Office quiz night Is there an Archimedes in HR? a da Vinci on Front Desk? See who’s the smartest with a classic office showdown. Everyone who takes part pays £5 to enter and the winner chooses a local charity or multiple charities to make £5 donations to. Fancy Dress Can you guess who Dave from Finance is supposed to be? Leo Sayer or Maroune Fellaini? Everyone donates £5 to take part (or not to for the more self-conscious folk) Of course, these are just our ideas; we look forward to seeing what you do on the day itself. And remember, in order to have a truly lasting impact on local charities and community groups we need to think beyond #GiveMe5 and towards providing future funding opportunities and key skills training. Our programmes and campaigns require significant resources. Through making a Corporate Donation to Localgiving you can help us make a tangible difference to communities across the UK. To discuss this further you can contact me on: darren.hall@localgiving.com     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandThe Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroBig Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge    
    2513 Posted by Darren Hall
  • With only three weeks to go until #GivingTuesday, now is the time to decide which groups or causes your company are supporting and, importantly, to dust off those fancy dress costumes stuffed behind the resource cupboard! #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving. It is about showing that you care about important causes and about your local community. It is also about getting involved and having fun! Having started in the U.S in 2012, this worldwide phenomenon aims to utilise the power of social media to bring about real change. This movement brings people together across diverse sectors of society to celebrate and encourage charitable giving. Why you should get involved? Last year Localgiving raised an incredible £55,000 through public donations and had an amazing time doing it. This year we really want our corporate partners to share in this experience.  With a little bit of effort and a big dose of fun, together we can raise awareness and money for local charities across the UK. Where should we start? On December the 1st Localgiving are running a campaign called #GiveMe5. We are pledging to double 1,000 x £5 donations made on the day. As a business you can use your corporate profile and image to support local charities and causes you care about.  You can add your logo to our list of partners, HERE.  In doing so you will pledge to promote #GiveMe5 on #GivingTuesday. Encourage your staff to get involved and to use social media to promote the charity they’re supporting via our #GiveMe5 campaign. If you or your staff haven’t yet chosen a charity, you can easily find a group in your local area HERE. We literally want to see a show of hands!  Show who you’re supporting on #GivingTuesday with a  #GiveMe5 selfie - let your friends, clients, local community and the world know you care about local charities. What can we do in the office on the day? Here are just a few ideas for what you and your office can do to raise money through #GiveMe5 on December 1st 2015. Donate an hour Each staff member can donate the equivalent of one hour’s salary to a local charity through #GiveMe5. If your hour’s salary is £15 then you can make 3 x £5 donations to a charity of your choice. Give up and donate Can’t do without your daily cappuccino, croissant or crisps? Give up an item for 5 days and donate what you would have spent to a local charity. Remember to round up to the nearest £5 to ensure your donation is included in #GiveMe5! Feed your office; let them know it's Giving Time! Ask all of your employees to bring in one dish for an extended lunch or evening party. Each member of staff then donates £5 (the average price of lunch) to a local charity on Localgiving through #GiveMe5 The Giveaway SELL, SELL, SELL!! Encourage your employees to sell things they don’t need any more online for £5 and donate the money to a local charity on Localgiving Office quiz night Is there an Archimedes in HR? a da Vinci on Front Desk? See who’s the smartest with a classic office showdown. Everyone who takes part pays £5 to enter and the winner chooses a local charity or multiple charities to make £5 donations to. Fancy Dress Can you guess who Dave from Finance is supposed to be? Leo Sayer or Maroune Fellaini? Everyone donates £5 to take part (or not to for the more self-conscious folk) Of course, these are just our ideas; we look forward to seeing what you do on the day itself. And remember, in order to have a truly lasting impact on local charities and community groups we need to think beyond #GiveMe5 and towards providing future funding opportunities and key skills training. Our programmes and campaigns require significant resources. Through making a Corporate Donation to Localgiving you can help us make a tangible difference to communities across the UK. To discuss this further you can contact me on: darren.hall@localgiving.com     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandThe Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroBig Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge    
    Nov 09, 2015 2513