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270 blogs
  • 17 Oct 2013
    Online charity fundraising platform Localgiving is about to embark on its first ever TV advertising campaign after partnering with Sky to trial new tailored advertising service Sky AdSmart. Sky AdSmart Sky AdSmart is a brand new service that improves TV ad breaks by tailoring the line-up of adverts according to a household’s profile. The technology works by sending a library of adverts via satellite to the Sky+HD set-top box and then selects the adverts which are inserted into the live ad break. The choice of adverts is based on information provided by Sky households, such as postcode, and the range of Sky products they take. This information is supplemented by additional insight from third-party providers including the data services company Experian. Localgiving is an online fundraising website which provides a platform to small local charities and community groups to raise money and awareness. Since Sky AdSmart can serve different adverts to different Sky households, Localgiving is able to use the service to run a campaign which focuses only on the areas in which their charity partners operate, enabling the not-for-profit website to advertise on TV for the first time. This effectively eliminates the waste that had previously made TV advertising prohibitive, when local charities would have needed to invest in advertising inventory nationwide. Our first TV campaign Localgiving’s first Sky AdSmart campaign will be broadcast to homes in and around Brighton and Hove. The campaign will encourage people in the Brighton and Hove area to find out about and support charities and voluntary groups in their local area. Localgiving will also use Sky AdSmart to roll out further campaigns to Bristol, Birmingham and Newcastle. Jamie West, Director, Sky AdSmart, comments: “We’re delighted to be partnering with Localgiving on this exciting trial. Sky AdSmart’s tailored advertising approach provides Localgiving with a unique opportunity to support charities within the Brighton and Hove area. As this trial demonstrates, Sky AdSmart can help those brands who’ve previously thought TV too broad a medium as well as local advertisers that have been priced out of TV until now. We’re looking forward to seeing the results and to rolling out the trial to other major cities across the UK.” Marcelle Speller OBE, Founder and Executive Chairman, Localgiving, adds: “This is a marvellous opportunity for Localgiving.com to connect local charities and community groups in a targeted area with the people who want to support them. In an environment where 85% of charitable income goes to just 5% of charities, Localgiving has a unique role to play in supporting the small groups and unsung heroes that work at the grass roots and we are delighted to be working with Sky Media as we look to use TV advertising to build stronger local communities.” --- Marcelle Speller will announce the partnership at the launch of Localgiving’s Grow Your Tenner 2013 campaign turning £500,000 from the Cabinet Office into over £1 million for grass roots charities across England. The Minister for Civil Society, Nick Hurd MP, will attend a launch event for Grow Your Tenner 2013 on Thursday, October 17th at The Westminster Hub, New Zealand House, 80 Haymarket, London SW1Y 4TE. Media wishing to attend are requested to email team@localgiving.com.
    1319 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Online charity fundraising platform Localgiving is about to embark on its first ever TV advertising campaign after partnering with Sky to trial new tailored advertising service Sky AdSmart. Sky AdSmart Sky AdSmart is a brand new service that improves TV ad breaks by tailoring the line-up of adverts according to a household’s profile. The technology works by sending a library of adverts via satellite to the Sky+HD set-top box and then selects the adverts which are inserted into the live ad break. The choice of adverts is based on information provided by Sky households, such as postcode, and the range of Sky products they take. This information is supplemented by additional insight from third-party providers including the data services company Experian. Localgiving is an online fundraising website which provides a platform to small local charities and community groups to raise money and awareness. Since Sky AdSmart can serve different adverts to different Sky households, Localgiving is able to use the service to run a campaign which focuses only on the areas in which their charity partners operate, enabling the not-for-profit website to advertise on TV for the first time. This effectively eliminates the waste that had previously made TV advertising prohibitive, when local charities would have needed to invest in advertising inventory nationwide. Our first TV campaign Localgiving’s first Sky AdSmart campaign will be broadcast to homes in and around Brighton and Hove. The campaign will encourage people in the Brighton and Hove area to find out about and support charities and voluntary groups in their local area. Localgiving will also use Sky AdSmart to roll out further campaigns to Bristol, Birmingham and Newcastle. Jamie West, Director, Sky AdSmart, comments: “We’re delighted to be partnering with Localgiving on this exciting trial. Sky AdSmart’s tailored advertising approach provides Localgiving with a unique opportunity to support charities within the Brighton and Hove area. As this trial demonstrates, Sky AdSmart can help those brands who’ve previously thought TV too broad a medium as well as local advertisers that have been priced out of TV until now. We’re looking forward to seeing the results and to rolling out the trial to other major cities across the UK.” Marcelle Speller OBE, Founder and Executive Chairman, Localgiving, adds: “This is a marvellous opportunity for Localgiving.com to connect local charities and community groups in a targeted area with the people who want to support them. In an environment where 85% of charitable income goes to just 5% of charities, Localgiving has a unique role to play in supporting the small groups and unsung heroes that work at the grass roots and we are delighted to be working with Sky Media as we look to use TV advertising to build stronger local communities.” --- Marcelle Speller will announce the partnership at the launch of Localgiving’s Grow Your Tenner 2013 campaign turning £500,000 from the Cabinet Office into over £1 million for grass roots charities across England. The Minister for Civil Society, Nick Hurd MP, will attend a launch event for Grow Your Tenner 2013 on Thursday, October 17th at The Westminster Hub, New Zealand House, 80 Haymarket, London SW1Y 4TE. Media wishing to attend are requested to email team@localgiving.com.
    Oct 17, 2013 1319
  • 14 Aug 2014
    Chris Dormer and I travelled to Berkshire yesterday to meet 4 groups and see first hand what the money raised through Localgiving does to support their community. We were guests of Berkshire Community Foundation (motto: “Connecting people who care with causes that matter”), and were being ferried hither and thither around the countryside by BCF’s online development worker, Dave Soper.  Dave’s job title doesn’t really do him justice – not only does he deeply understand what makes local charities and community groups tick, but he has a fascinating perspective on the fundraising dynamic, and, for the day, we were treated to a master class on how local charities can be successful. Our first meeting - Swallowfield Community Responders It was another bright sunny August day in Berkshire: the air was warming up nicely as Chris and I met with Swallowfield Community Responders team Gary and Ian. On show was their smart BMW X1 in its unmissable ambulance livery. Swallowfield Community Responders is run by South Central Ambulance Service, and whenever a 999 call is made in the local area, an ambulance will be dispatched, and if appropriate, a first responder will also be sent to the scene. Community First Responders are trained by the Ambulance Service to deal with a variety of medical emergencies until the ambulance arrives, and their equipment includes a defibrillator to reset the heart in the event of a cardiac arrest. A special kind of volunteer First Responders are a special kind of volunteer – their lives are on hold while they’re on duty and they never know when they’ll be called upon to provide assistance, perhaps saving a life or providing emergency care. Their kit has to be paid for (although the NHS replenishes it for free), and there are considerable startup and running costs, provided by grants, fundraising events and generous donors. Hear what Gary has to say about the role Localgiving has played in helping their organisation:   Local groups deserve our gratitude As I learn more about some of the groups that look to Localgiving to help raise funds for their work, I am in awe of their dedication, expertise and commitment. Not all groups are as visible as Swallowfield Community Responders, nor are all of them engaged so directly in life-critical work, but I’m discovering that they share this common purpose and determination to do what they can to make our communities better places for the rest of us. They more than deserve our gratitude and support.  Next up - Bradfield Cricket Club Leaving Swallowfield, we whizzed off to meet Dave at Bradfield Cricket Club. In 2011 the club’s pavilion was burned down in an arson attack, and its entire future was at risk had it not been able to build a new pavilion quickly. Insurance didn’t cover the entire amount and so the club got motivated and raised £17,000 from its friends and members, including nearly £40,000 using Localgiving. Looking around their smart new building, I was impressed by the evident involvement of many, many people – folks who value the role the cricket club plays in the local community. Then on to Hurst Bowling Club Next on the agenda was Hurst Bowling Club (est. 1747) with the unforgettable Ronnie – a lady with a twinkle in the eye and a huge heart. Here, in this idyllic corner of Berkshire, nestled next to the Castle Inn, the Bowls Club has big ambitions for its clubhouse. After sourcing a new mower to tend its impeccable lawns, Ronnie is determined that the club will achieve its goals, widen its membership base and provide facilities for more people to enjoy this most social and gentle game. After being awarded the emblem of the club – a bunch of grapes badge - we were off again, to The Link Visiting Scheme in Wokingham. Our final visit - The Link Visiting Scheme Michael and Heather welcomed us with a much-needed cup of tea and we heard of the huge difference local volunteers can make in the lives of elderly people. The Link Visiting Scheme aims to befriend and support anyone who is isolated or lonely and who would benefit from receiving a regular visitor. The majority of those visited are older people, but there are no age restrictions applied. On one wall was an array of photographs of beaming older folk with their new friends. It was gratifying to hear that The Link has teamed up with Hurst Bowls Club who provide sessions for befriended and befrienders. I was left with the strong impression that running through the Link team is a strong cord of care and concern. And yet, like many small local groups, their services come at a cost, and so they have also turned to Localgiving to help them raise the funds to keep their services going. So many lives touched and changed Chris and I would like to thank all the groups we met for their warm hospitality, BCF’s Chief Executive Andrew Middleton for his encouragement and help in making this happen, and of course, to Dave Soper for his wisdom, wit and sheer enthusiasm.Our day ended with a trip back to Reading station and we reflected on what we’d seen with Dave, our host. So many lessons, so many initiatives, so many lives touched and changed. It’s clear to me that when it comes to voluntary organisations, normal rules and expectations do not necessarily apply. Volunteers will go above and beyond, but it will, in all likelihood, happen outside the normal 9 ‘til 5. We do well to remember that as we configure our services to support them.
    1847 Posted by Steve Mallinson
  • Chris Dormer and I travelled to Berkshire yesterday to meet 4 groups and see first hand what the money raised through Localgiving does to support their community. We were guests of Berkshire Community Foundation (motto: “Connecting people who care with causes that matter”), and were being ferried hither and thither around the countryside by BCF’s online development worker, Dave Soper.  Dave’s job title doesn’t really do him justice – not only does he deeply understand what makes local charities and community groups tick, but he has a fascinating perspective on the fundraising dynamic, and, for the day, we were treated to a master class on how local charities can be successful. Our first meeting - Swallowfield Community Responders It was another bright sunny August day in Berkshire: the air was warming up nicely as Chris and I met with Swallowfield Community Responders team Gary and Ian. On show was their smart BMW X1 in its unmissable ambulance livery. Swallowfield Community Responders is run by South Central Ambulance Service, and whenever a 999 call is made in the local area, an ambulance will be dispatched, and if appropriate, a first responder will also be sent to the scene. Community First Responders are trained by the Ambulance Service to deal with a variety of medical emergencies until the ambulance arrives, and their equipment includes a defibrillator to reset the heart in the event of a cardiac arrest. A special kind of volunteer First Responders are a special kind of volunteer – their lives are on hold while they’re on duty and they never know when they’ll be called upon to provide assistance, perhaps saving a life or providing emergency care. Their kit has to be paid for (although the NHS replenishes it for free), and there are considerable startup and running costs, provided by grants, fundraising events and generous donors. Hear what Gary has to say about the role Localgiving has played in helping their organisation:   Local groups deserve our gratitude As I learn more about some of the groups that look to Localgiving to help raise funds for their work, I am in awe of their dedication, expertise and commitment. Not all groups are as visible as Swallowfield Community Responders, nor are all of them engaged so directly in life-critical work, but I’m discovering that they share this common purpose and determination to do what they can to make our communities better places for the rest of us. They more than deserve our gratitude and support.  Next up - Bradfield Cricket Club Leaving Swallowfield, we whizzed off to meet Dave at Bradfield Cricket Club. In 2011 the club’s pavilion was burned down in an arson attack, and its entire future was at risk had it not been able to build a new pavilion quickly. Insurance didn’t cover the entire amount and so the club got motivated and raised £17,000 from its friends and members, including nearly £40,000 using Localgiving. Looking around their smart new building, I was impressed by the evident involvement of many, many people – folks who value the role the cricket club plays in the local community. Then on to Hurst Bowling Club Next on the agenda was Hurst Bowling Club (est. 1747) with the unforgettable Ronnie – a lady with a twinkle in the eye and a huge heart. Here, in this idyllic corner of Berkshire, nestled next to the Castle Inn, the Bowls Club has big ambitions for its clubhouse. After sourcing a new mower to tend its impeccable lawns, Ronnie is determined that the club will achieve its goals, widen its membership base and provide facilities for more people to enjoy this most social and gentle game. After being awarded the emblem of the club – a bunch of grapes badge - we were off again, to The Link Visiting Scheme in Wokingham. Our final visit - The Link Visiting Scheme Michael and Heather welcomed us with a much-needed cup of tea and we heard of the huge difference local volunteers can make in the lives of elderly people. The Link Visiting Scheme aims to befriend and support anyone who is isolated or lonely and who would benefit from receiving a regular visitor. The majority of those visited are older people, but there are no age restrictions applied. On one wall was an array of photographs of beaming older folk with their new friends. It was gratifying to hear that The Link has teamed up with Hurst Bowls Club who provide sessions for befriended and befrienders. I was left with the strong impression that running through the Link team is a strong cord of care and concern. And yet, like many small local groups, their services come at a cost, and so they have also turned to Localgiving to help them raise the funds to keep their services going. So many lives touched and changed Chris and I would like to thank all the groups we met for their warm hospitality, BCF’s Chief Executive Andrew Middleton for his encouragement and help in making this happen, and of course, to Dave Soper for his wisdom, wit and sheer enthusiasm.Our day ended with a trip back to Reading station and we reflected on what we’d seen with Dave, our host. So many lessons, so many initiatives, so many lives touched and changed. It’s clear to me that when it comes to voluntary organisations, normal rules and expectations do not necessarily apply. Volunteers will go above and beyond, but it will, in all likelihood, happen outside the normal 9 ‘til 5. We do well to remember that as we configure our services to support them.
    Aug 14, 2014 1847
  • 14 Jul 2015
    June, 88, runs a community group called Singing with Dementia, Salford. This group supports around 65 people per week; People with Dementia and carers can come for respite, support, relaxation and fun. In this interview June reflects on how she learnt to use a computer, aged 79, and how technology helps her run her group. How did Singing with Dementia get started? “We had opened a Resource Centre in Eccles for people with dementia  and their Carers and, whilst it did well, we felt we could do more. After watching a programme on TV in which a musician worked with people with Dementia, I knew I had found the answer. It proved more difficult than anticipated to set up but we eventually managed it. Never in my wildest dreams did I  imagine it would ‘take off’ as it has. We had 16 people come the first day and now have 55 to 65 people attending every week.” How did you get started using a computer? “I already had a Dell computer and was attending various courses but was not very efficient. I decided to change to Apple and take advantage of their 1:1 teaching sessions. I needed to be more proficient and efficient and Apple helped with advice and teaching sessions. I now use my computer all the time for: Communicating with other groups, people interested in funding and every day business Reaching a lot of people- this saves us time and money Researching what’s new in the dementia world, who is doing what and where Filing of all documents - this is very efficient and documents are easily accessible at any time Applying for funding - most donors want online applications Correspondence” What were the biggest lessons learned for you? “Learning a new language and a new skill Realising what a powerful tool my computer is and putting my knowledge to good use to benefit my cause Becoming less worried about breaking my computer Conquering all of the above and then enjoying using my new knowledge to fully benefit my cause. It is a great feeling and worth all the effort. I am always learning as there is always something new in this exciting world we live in”   What are the benefits of using Facebook and Twitter? “It helps us to spread the word to a wider audience and puts us in touch with people doing similar work. People 'retweet' which means that more and more people can see what you do. You get exposure to different groups which normally would not be available to you. It builds a lot of interest - I have had many messages from overseas readers. You can use it to advertise forthcoming events and keeps your work in peoples' minds - this is very important.” So, what next? “Recently, we bought two iPads and I am using them to work with people with dementia as another method of interaction and communication. I am learning as I go along but it is taking off and proving to be another useful method in the art of communication. I download special games and use them as interaction tools - it is an ongoing learning experience!” What advice would you give to someone who is starting off using a computer and the internet?  “Take a knowledgeable person with you when you purchase a computer and buy the best that you can afford. Be certain that the shop that you buy from offers good customer service and that follow up advice is readily available. Have a clear idea of what you want the computer to do for you. Buy or borrow books and read up to increase your knowledge. Seek help and keep practicing until you are familiar with what you are doing. Be not afraid!!” “I would advise anyone to use computers for their charity work. It is an invaluable tool and if I can do it age 88 then anyone can!” To find out more about June's work with Singing with Dementia, go to their new website: www.singingwithdementia.co.uk . To support the work of Singing with Dementia, Salford, visit their Localgiving page: www.localgiving.com/swithdinsalford
    1847 Posted by Cara Sanquest
  • June, 88, runs a community group called Singing with Dementia, Salford. This group supports around 65 people per week; People with Dementia and carers can come for respite, support, relaxation and fun. In this interview June reflects on how she learnt to use a computer, aged 79, and how technology helps her run her group. How did Singing with Dementia get started? “We had opened a Resource Centre in Eccles for people with dementia  and their Carers and, whilst it did well, we felt we could do more. After watching a programme on TV in which a musician worked with people with Dementia, I knew I had found the answer. It proved more difficult than anticipated to set up but we eventually managed it. Never in my wildest dreams did I  imagine it would ‘take off’ as it has. We had 16 people come the first day and now have 55 to 65 people attending every week.” How did you get started using a computer? “I already had a Dell computer and was attending various courses but was not very efficient. I decided to change to Apple and take advantage of their 1:1 teaching sessions. I needed to be more proficient and efficient and Apple helped with advice and teaching sessions. I now use my computer all the time for: Communicating with other groups, people interested in funding and every day business Reaching a lot of people- this saves us time and money Researching what’s new in the dementia world, who is doing what and where Filing of all documents - this is very efficient and documents are easily accessible at any time Applying for funding - most donors want online applications Correspondence” What were the biggest lessons learned for you? “Learning a new language and a new skill Realising what a powerful tool my computer is and putting my knowledge to good use to benefit my cause Becoming less worried about breaking my computer Conquering all of the above and then enjoying using my new knowledge to fully benefit my cause. It is a great feeling and worth all the effort. I am always learning as there is always something new in this exciting world we live in”   What are the benefits of using Facebook and Twitter? “It helps us to spread the word to a wider audience and puts us in touch with people doing similar work. People 'retweet' which means that more and more people can see what you do. You get exposure to different groups which normally would not be available to you. It builds a lot of interest - I have had many messages from overseas readers. You can use it to advertise forthcoming events and keeps your work in peoples' minds - this is very important.” So, what next? “Recently, we bought two iPads and I am using them to work with people with dementia as another method of interaction and communication. I am learning as I go along but it is taking off and proving to be another useful method in the art of communication. I download special games and use them as interaction tools - it is an ongoing learning experience!” What advice would you give to someone who is starting off using a computer and the internet?  “Take a knowledgeable person with you when you purchase a computer and buy the best that you can afford. Be certain that the shop that you buy from offers good customer service and that follow up advice is readily available. Have a clear idea of what you want the computer to do for you. Buy or borrow books and read up to increase your knowledge. Seek help and keep practicing until you are familiar with what you are doing. Be not afraid!!” “I would advise anyone to use computers for their charity work. It is an invaluable tool and if I can do it age 88 then anyone can!” To find out more about June's work with Singing with Dementia, go to their new website: www.singingwithdementia.co.uk . To support the work of Singing with Dementia, Salford, visit their Localgiving page: www.localgiving.com/swithdinsalford
    Jul 14, 2015 1847
  • 13 Jul 2015
    You may have already heard mention of the Government's Local Sustainability Fund. Now that the details have been announced, it's worth summarising what it's all about and consider whether your charity is eligible to apply. The fund totals £20m and is intended for up to 250 organisations working in the Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) sector - that's around £80k per group over two years. In the words of the Cabinet Office website: "The fund, which will be delivered by the Big Lottery Fund, will provide grants that will enable recipients to implement organisational changes and access professional advice that might currently be out of their reach. It will give VCSEs access to a wider range of skills and support, with all grant recipients establishing a strong volunteering relationship with a local business. These cross sector relationships will help grant recipients to strengthen their resilience and long term sustainability." Do I Qualify?  The Cabinet Office has issued this guidance: "Key eligibility requirements are that applicants: are medium sized with a turnover of between £100,000 and £1.5m have board approval have been established in some form for at least 5 years (this is for organisations facing challenges as a result of the downturn rather than newer orgs) are frontline organisations delivering services in England, providing services that directly and specifically benefit vulnerable or disadvantaged people. They do not limit the definition of vulnerable and disadvantaged people to a specific list of characteristics."  They also want to see that organisations are: facing funding and/or organisational challenges that present a serious risk to the continued delivery of their services in the longer-term; but, not at immediate risk of closure. Change takes time and applicants will need to be able to demonstrate that they have sufficient financial security to allow change to take place. What do I do if I qualify? The next thing you need to do is head over to the VCSE Sustainability Fund website and follow the instructions there: http://vcsediagnostic.org.uk/ If you want to apply you'll have to act quick: the first stage closes on the 26th July - so there's not much time. But if you do qualify, then this is certainly worth engaging with.  And if you don't qualify - don't worry - Localgiving will be running a series of campaigns and promotions through the year to help you and your charity reach out to secure more supporters and more donations. Keep your eyes peeled for more news...! UPDATE If you're thinking of applying, one of our groups has pointed out a couple of things about the VCSE Diagnostic website to be aware of: The Eligibility Checker indicated that a group wasn't eligible when in fact it was. The group was advised to continue with the application regardless. If you have doubts, it may be worth calling the BIG Advice Line on 0345 4 10 20 30. Please save your application as you go through the process. It is possible that, if you don't, your data may be lost at the end!      
    1661 Posted by Steve Mallinson
  • You may have already heard mention of the Government's Local Sustainability Fund. Now that the details have been announced, it's worth summarising what it's all about and consider whether your charity is eligible to apply. The fund totals £20m and is intended for up to 250 organisations working in the Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) sector - that's around £80k per group over two years. In the words of the Cabinet Office website: "The fund, which will be delivered by the Big Lottery Fund, will provide grants that will enable recipients to implement organisational changes and access professional advice that might currently be out of their reach. It will give VCSEs access to a wider range of skills and support, with all grant recipients establishing a strong volunteering relationship with a local business. These cross sector relationships will help grant recipients to strengthen their resilience and long term sustainability." Do I Qualify?  The Cabinet Office has issued this guidance: "Key eligibility requirements are that applicants: are medium sized with a turnover of between £100,000 and £1.5m have board approval have been established in some form for at least 5 years (this is for organisations facing challenges as a result of the downturn rather than newer orgs) are frontline organisations delivering services in England, providing services that directly and specifically benefit vulnerable or disadvantaged people. They do not limit the definition of vulnerable and disadvantaged people to a specific list of characteristics."  They also want to see that organisations are: facing funding and/or organisational challenges that present a serious risk to the continued delivery of their services in the longer-term; but, not at immediate risk of closure. Change takes time and applicants will need to be able to demonstrate that they have sufficient financial security to allow change to take place. What do I do if I qualify? The next thing you need to do is head over to the VCSE Sustainability Fund website and follow the instructions there: http://vcsediagnostic.org.uk/ If you want to apply you'll have to act quick: the first stage closes on the 26th July - so there's not much time. But if you do qualify, then this is certainly worth engaging with.  And if you don't qualify - don't worry - Localgiving will be running a series of campaigns and promotions through the year to help you and your charity reach out to secure more supporters and more donations. Keep your eyes peeled for more news...! UPDATE If you're thinking of applying, one of our groups has pointed out a couple of things about the VCSE Diagnostic website to be aware of: The Eligibility Checker indicated that a group wasn't eligible when in fact it was. The group was advised to continue with the application regardless. If you have doubts, it may be worth calling the BIG Advice Line on 0345 4 10 20 30. Please save your application as you go through the process. It is possible that, if you don't, your data may be lost at the end!      
    Jul 13, 2015 1661
  • 07 Jan 2014
    Afro*disiac Live Radio CIC is an independent, online radio station based in Christchurch, Dorset. The group gives music production and radio training for local young, older and disadvantaged people. Helping to increase their skills, confidence and future prospects. Station director, Raymond Nyenje, says “We believe Localgiving is the best online fundraising tool. As a C.I.C, it’s difficult for us to access grants and other fundraising avenues. With Localgiving.com it’s simple for us to generate donations and thanks to promotions like Grow Your Tenner, friends and supporters can get involved and we receive matched funding - it’s a fantastic idea for local organisations like us. “Running Afro*disiac has been tough as it operates out of a double garage at one of our director’s homes, with second hand equipment that’s prone to breaking down. The garage isn’t equipped with a bathroom or heating and with just under 20 DJs and presenters using the temporary studio the lack of quality equipment and amenities can be difficult. Thanks to funds raised through Grow Your Tenner, over £2,230, we’re hoping to relocate to Bourne Spring Community Centre in spring 2014 and purchase new computers and mixers for the new studio.” Find out more about and support Afro*disiac here.
    837 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Afro*disiac Live Radio CIC is an independent, online radio station based in Christchurch, Dorset. The group gives music production and radio training for local young, older and disadvantaged people. Helping to increase their skills, confidence and future prospects. Station director, Raymond Nyenje, says “We believe Localgiving is the best online fundraising tool. As a C.I.C, it’s difficult for us to access grants and other fundraising avenues. With Localgiving.com it’s simple for us to generate donations and thanks to promotions like Grow Your Tenner, friends and supporters can get involved and we receive matched funding - it’s a fantastic idea for local organisations like us. “Running Afro*disiac has been tough as it operates out of a double garage at one of our director’s homes, with second hand equipment that’s prone to breaking down. The garage isn’t equipped with a bathroom or heating and with just under 20 DJs and presenters using the temporary studio the lack of quality equipment and amenities can be difficult. Thanks to funds raised through Grow Your Tenner, over £2,230, we’re hoping to relocate to Bourne Spring Community Centre in spring 2014 and purchase new computers and mixers for the new studio.” Find out more about and support Afro*disiac here.
    Jan 07, 2014 837
  • 10 Jan 2014
    Over £900,000 has been raised through Grow Your Tenner so far (with matched funding and Gift Aid) – Thank you! We hope that the extra funds will help local communities across England to continue with their great work through 2014. The Grow Your Tenner campaign will complete once the entire £500,000 fund has been allocated or on 28th February 2014 at 10pm, regardless of any monies remaining in the fund. So be sure to Grow Your Tenner and make the most of the campaign before it all goes! There’s just over £100,000 available so support your favourite local cause and the first £10 of your gift will be doubled. Sign up to a monthly donation, and your gift will be doubled up to £10 a month for six months!
    1009 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Over £900,000 has been raised through Grow Your Tenner so far (with matched funding and Gift Aid) – Thank you! We hope that the extra funds will help local communities across England to continue with their great work through 2014. The Grow Your Tenner campaign will complete once the entire £500,000 fund has been allocated or on 28th February 2014 at 10pm, regardless of any monies remaining in the fund. So be sure to Grow Your Tenner and make the most of the campaign before it all goes! There’s just over £100,000 available so support your favourite local cause and the first £10 of your gift will be doubled. Sign up to a monthly donation, and your gift will be doubled up to £10 a month for six months!
    Jan 10, 2014 1009
  • 17 Jan 2014
    Based in Wolverhampton, ConGens works to connect generations by providing health and wellbeing events and activities for young and older people. From exercise classes and social dances to cooking projects and I.T training, delivering intergenerational projects helps to bring local young and older people together to increase respect and understanding. Following on from a successful fundraising experience during Grow Your Tenner 2012, ConGens has benefitted from £4,600 through Grow Your Tenner 2013. Janet Mahay, Vice Chair of ConGens says “Grow Your Tenner is a fantastic arrangement for local groups to raise additional funds to support their work. Many funding sources groups have previously relied on are increasingly difficult to access or no longer exist, so with funds raised from Grow Your Tenner we’ll be able to provide day trips and lunches for our members. “ With funding from the Grow Your Tenner campaign in 2012, the group were able to deliver an eight week computer training project for older people, teaching them basic computer skills so that they can enjoy the benefits of being online like many other ‘Silver Surfers’. One participant, Mrs Lue, was very excited about the project as she had wanted to learn how to use a computer for a long time but hadn’t had the opportunity to. By the end of the program she had learned basic I.T. skills sufficient enough to use the computer independently. She was so happy about the new skills she’d gained, she introduced her husband to computing and they now support each other in their learning. “Localgiving has been a tremendous asset to our organisation, since joining we’ve benefitted in numerous ways. Grow Your Tenner has helped us to raise money for projects and general expenditure. Having a webpage on Localgiving.com gives our group greater credibility in the eyes of supporters, they can see that we are a trusted, structured group and read about what we do before making a secure donation with Gift Aid.” Find out more about and support ConGens here.
    948 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Based in Wolverhampton, ConGens works to connect generations by providing health and wellbeing events and activities for young and older people. From exercise classes and social dances to cooking projects and I.T training, delivering intergenerational projects helps to bring local young and older people together to increase respect and understanding. Following on from a successful fundraising experience during Grow Your Tenner 2012, ConGens has benefitted from £4,600 through Grow Your Tenner 2013. Janet Mahay, Vice Chair of ConGens says “Grow Your Tenner is a fantastic arrangement for local groups to raise additional funds to support their work. Many funding sources groups have previously relied on are increasingly difficult to access or no longer exist, so with funds raised from Grow Your Tenner we’ll be able to provide day trips and lunches for our members. “ With funding from the Grow Your Tenner campaign in 2012, the group were able to deliver an eight week computer training project for older people, teaching them basic computer skills so that they can enjoy the benefits of being online like many other ‘Silver Surfers’. One participant, Mrs Lue, was very excited about the project as she had wanted to learn how to use a computer for a long time but hadn’t had the opportunity to. By the end of the program she had learned basic I.T. skills sufficient enough to use the computer independently. She was so happy about the new skills she’d gained, she introduced her husband to computing and they now support each other in their learning. “Localgiving has been a tremendous asset to our organisation, since joining we’ve benefitted in numerous ways. Grow Your Tenner has helped us to raise money for projects and general expenditure. Having a webpage on Localgiving.com gives our group greater credibility in the eyes of supporters, they can see that we are a trusted, structured group and read about what we do before making a secure donation with Gift Aid.” Find out more about and support ConGens here.
    Jan 17, 2014 948
  • 28 Jan 2014
    “SWINDON 105.5 has been on air for almost six years, serving the town as an accessible, inclusive station, delivering local programmes made by groups and individuals for the whole community. “Our youngest trainee is 10 years old and our oldest presenter is 72. We provide training at all levels, from school placements to students wanting to go on to university to community groups needing to develop their profile and confidence in using the media. We also support unemployed people needing to develop skills and volunteers wanting to become part of the Station on a long-term basis. Seeking new funding streams “As a not for profit, non-commercial radio station, we rely on grant-funded projects, donations, fundraising activities and ‘Friends’. After hearing that costs of remaining at our current premises were going to increase considerably, with fairly short notice, we started looking at how to manage our current situation in the short-term and long-term as well as seeking possible alternative accommodation. Right time, right campaign “Whatever the decision, more funds were needed to help us through. So the Localgiving Grow Your Tenner Challenge came at just the right time. We set ourselves a target of raising at least £3,000. Donations came in, volunteers carried out a couple of fundraising bag packs and the number of “Friends” has increased. We raised just over £3,000 and with donations through a forthcoming Valentines evening, we expect to increase this just in time before Grow Your Tenner ends. “This fundraising has covered premises costs for the coming six months and is giving us time to develop ongoing support. Plus our Patron, Lord Joel Joffe’s fund will be donating £2,000 to us because we have achieved this £3,000 through Localgiving. The Grow Your Tenner opportunity proved really helpful in making people aware of showing support for SWINDON 105.5”. Shirley Ludford, Station Manager and Trainer, SWINDON 105.5. Find out more about SWINDON 105.5 here.
    1388 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • “SWINDON 105.5 has been on air for almost six years, serving the town as an accessible, inclusive station, delivering local programmes made by groups and individuals for the whole community. “Our youngest trainee is 10 years old and our oldest presenter is 72. We provide training at all levels, from school placements to students wanting to go on to university to community groups needing to develop their profile and confidence in using the media. We also support unemployed people needing to develop skills and volunteers wanting to become part of the Station on a long-term basis. Seeking new funding streams “As a not for profit, non-commercial radio station, we rely on grant-funded projects, donations, fundraising activities and ‘Friends’. After hearing that costs of remaining at our current premises were going to increase considerably, with fairly short notice, we started looking at how to manage our current situation in the short-term and long-term as well as seeking possible alternative accommodation. Right time, right campaign “Whatever the decision, more funds were needed to help us through. So the Localgiving Grow Your Tenner Challenge came at just the right time. We set ourselves a target of raising at least £3,000. Donations came in, volunteers carried out a couple of fundraising bag packs and the number of “Friends” has increased. We raised just over £3,000 and with donations through a forthcoming Valentines evening, we expect to increase this just in time before Grow Your Tenner ends. “This fundraising has covered premises costs for the coming six months and is giving us time to develop ongoing support. Plus our Patron, Lord Joel Joffe’s fund will be donating £2,000 to us because we have achieved this £3,000 through Localgiving. The Grow Your Tenner opportunity proved really helpful in making people aware of showing support for SWINDON 105.5”. Shirley Ludford, Station Manager and Trainer, SWINDON 105.5. Find out more about SWINDON 105.5 here.
    Jan 28, 2014 1388
  • 29 Jan 2014
    LGBT Youth North West raised over £3,215 through Grow Your Tenner, helping to continue the great work the charity carries out in support of young LGBT in North West England. Over 300 people in the local area use the LGBT Youth Centre as a safe space to access support, social opportunities and volunteering/training opportunities. Without the organisation, “many of the group’s members would return to misusing alcohol and drugs or become very isolated”, predicts Ali Hanbury, the Centre Manager. Others would lose out on opportunities of increasing their skill set and their confidence. The centre is at capacity and is in need of repairs and improvements which the money raised during Grow Your Tenner will be put towards. It costs around £1,000 a week to run the centre so the unrestricted funds provided through Localgiving are a big help. The group have also managed to secure seven matched monthly donations which provides a comfort over uncertain funding in the future. Emergency food parcels LGBT Youth North West will also use the money to buy extra emergency food parcels for homeless young people such as one transgender man who was thrown out of his family home after “coming out”. The centre has helped him to purchase items for college as well as dedicated staff time to help with homework, time management and travel costs. Ali explains that with the success of these interventions, “he has maintained good attendance at college and is now developing friendships on the course and is able to access learning mentors.” One of the biggest on-going problems the organisation faces is the assumption that LGBT equality has been achieved. As Ali clarifies, “Unfortunately many of our users continue to experience negative experiences of discrimination and our services help to counter this through training, work in schools, campaigns and through best-practice events.” Using the tools available to boost their fundraising The ability to use Localgiving to receive donations and benefit from their match fund campaigns will go towards making sure there is much needed support still available to the LGBT community in the North West of England. By using the resources from the Fundraising Toolkit, the team were able to focus on a strategy for promoting the webpage through twitter and other online networks. “Localgiving has been a real asset to our fundraising efforts and the Grow Your Tenner has made a massive impact” says Ali. Click here to find out more about LGBT Youth North West
    1005 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • LGBT Youth North West raised over £3,215 through Grow Your Tenner, helping to continue the great work the charity carries out in support of young LGBT in North West England. Over 300 people in the local area use the LGBT Youth Centre as a safe space to access support, social opportunities and volunteering/training opportunities. Without the organisation, “many of the group’s members would return to misusing alcohol and drugs or become very isolated”, predicts Ali Hanbury, the Centre Manager. Others would lose out on opportunities of increasing their skill set and their confidence. The centre is at capacity and is in need of repairs and improvements which the money raised during Grow Your Tenner will be put towards. It costs around £1,000 a week to run the centre so the unrestricted funds provided through Localgiving are a big help. The group have also managed to secure seven matched monthly donations which provides a comfort over uncertain funding in the future. Emergency food parcels LGBT Youth North West will also use the money to buy extra emergency food parcels for homeless young people such as one transgender man who was thrown out of his family home after “coming out”. The centre has helped him to purchase items for college as well as dedicated staff time to help with homework, time management and travel costs. Ali explains that with the success of these interventions, “he has maintained good attendance at college and is now developing friendships on the course and is able to access learning mentors.” One of the biggest on-going problems the organisation faces is the assumption that LGBT equality has been achieved. As Ali clarifies, “Unfortunately many of our users continue to experience negative experiences of discrimination and our services help to counter this through training, work in schools, campaigns and through best-practice events.” Using the tools available to boost their fundraising The ability to use Localgiving to receive donations and benefit from their match fund campaigns will go towards making sure there is much needed support still available to the LGBT community in the North West of England. By using the resources from the Fundraising Toolkit, the team were able to focus on a strategy for promoting the webpage through twitter and other online networks. “Localgiving has been a real asset to our fundraising efforts and the Grow Your Tenner has made a massive impact” says Ali. Click here to find out more about LGBT Youth North West
    Jan 29, 2014 1005
  • 29 Jan 2014
    With funding from the Peter Sowerby Foundation, we’re matching donations to charities and community groups in North Yorkshire pound-for-pound from 10am on March 4, 2014. Once complete, the £20,000 match fund will raise £40,000 + Gift Aid for local charities in North Yorkshire. Both single donations and monthly donations will be doubled up to £500 per charity. Monthly donations will be matched pound-for-pound for up to six months. In addition to this, North Yorkshire charities can also benefit from 50 free annual Localgiving.com memberships (worth £72 each), to be given on a first come first served basis. For more information, get in touch with Nick Dodd, North Yorkshire Coordinator on 07852 122329 or email nick.dodd@localgiving.com. Be sure to follow Nick on Twitter for all of the latest campaign updates.
    989 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • With funding from the Peter Sowerby Foundation, we’re matching donations to charities and community groups in North Yorkshire pound-for-pound from 10am on March 4, 2014. Once complete, the £20,000 match fund will raise £40,000 + Gift Aid for local charities in North Yorkshire. Both single donations and monthly donations will be doubled up to £500 per charity. Monthly donations will be matched pound-for-pound for up to six months. In addition to this, North Yorkshire charities can also benefit from 50 free annual Localgiving.com memberships (worth £72 each), to be given on a first come first served basis. For more information, get in touch with Nick Dodd, North Yorkshire Coordinator on 07852 122329 or email nick.dodd@localgiving.com. Be sure to follow Nick on Twitter for all of the latest campaign updates.
    Jan 29, 2014 989