Register your organisation

Set up a fundraising page

Subscribe to our mailing list



270 blogs
  • 04 Dec 2014
    Big Lunch Extras is a free programme to help people run projects that will bring about positive change in their communities –  anything from befriending schemes and festivals to community kitchens and making better use of local derelict land. Following on from the success of The Big Lunch - the UK’s annual get-together for neighbours which invites communities to come together for lunch - Big Lunch Extras is about taking your community spirit that little bit further. So if you need some help with an existing project, or have a great idea for a new one then Big Lunch Extras could be exactly what you’re looking for. It starts with a free three-day residential training event at the Eden Project, which is packed full of inspiration, workshops, practical support, and opportunities to share and develop ideas with like-minded people from across the UK. There are just a handful of camps left, so now is the time to sign up and apply for your place. So how does it work? First off, you’ll come to Eden, in Cornwall, for an immersive weekend to get inspiration, practical skills and the confidence to make real, positive changes within your community. You’ll also get the opportunity to attend regional events near you, where you’ll be introduced to others in your area. The Big Lunch Extras team will stay in touch to offer support and to hear how you’re getting on throughout the programme. What’s more, you’ll be part of a fantastic network of some 900 people on the programme who are all in the same boat as you – sharing ideas, contacts and support.   When are the Camps in 2015? February 27th February – 2nd March  April 17th – 20th May 15th – 18th  July 17th – 20th More dates to be confirmed soon – keep checking www.biglunchextras.com for updates. Camp places are funded and include accommodation and travel, so there really is no reason not to take up this fantastic opportunity. Sound good? Apply for your free place on Big Lunch Extras now! www.biglunchextras.com
    1033 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Big Lunch Extras is a free programme to help people run projects that will bring about positive change in their communities –  anything from befriending schemes and festivals to community kitchens and making better use of local derelict land. Following on from the success of The Big Lunch - the UK’s annual get-together for neighbours which invites communities to come together for lunch - Big Lunch Extras is about taking your community spirit that little bit further. So if you need some help with an existing project, or have a great idea for a new one then Big Lunch Extras could be exactly what you’re looking for. It starts with a free three-day residential training event at the Eden Project, which is packed full of inspiration, workshops, practical support, and opportunities to share and develop ideas with like-minded people from across the UK. There are just a handful of camps left, so now is the time to sign up and apply for your place. So how does it work? First off, you’ll come to Eden, in Cornwall, for an immersive weekend to get inspiration, practical skills and the confidence to make real, positive changes within your community. You’ll also get the opportunity to attend regional events near you, where you’ll be introduced to others in your area. The Big Lunch Extras team will stay in touch to offer support and to hear how you’re getting on throughout the programme. What’s more, you’ll be part of a fantastic network of some 900 people on the programme who are all in the same boat as you – sharing ideas, contacts and support.   When are the Camps in 2015? February 27th February – 2nd March  April 17th – 20th May 15th – 18th  July 17th – 20th More dates to be confirmed soon – keep checking www.biglunchextras.com for updates. Camp places are funded and include accommodation and travel, so there really is no reason not to take up this fantastic opportunity. Sound good? Apply for your free place on Big Lunch Extras now! www.biglunchextras.com
    Dec 04, 2014 1033
  • 24 Jun 2015
    How you interact with your fundraiser once their event is over is crucial when it comes to converting them into a long-term supporter. In this blog we will be looking at 4 simple ways to keep your fundraisers engaged in your charity and your cause. 1. Publicly thank them for their support Use social media, emails or a newsletter to publicly thank your fundraiser for their efforts. Let everyone know how much they raised, what they did to raise it and, crucially, how much it means to your charity.  Thanking your fundraiser publicly also gives them a chance to share your message of appreciation with their personal networks, creating extra publicity for your charity and potentially inspiring a whole new group of people to fundraise for you in the future. 2. Invite them to visit you in person A great way to build a relationship with your fundraiser is to invite them to a team meeting or event and thank them face-to-face for their efforts. If possible, introduce your fundraisers to beneficiaries to remind them what their funds will be going towards and how people's lives will be positively affected. Read about how one group, York Carers, did just that for their fundraiser, Tony Ives.  3. Keep them up to date with your progress If your fundraiser was raising money for a particular project then send them updates of how it is going. Including images and testimonials from people the project has helped can be a great way of adding meaning to these updates. If you are sharing this information publicly then make sure you acknowledge which fundraiser(s) made it possible. Thanking your fundraisers in this way lets them know their efforts where worthwhile and could be the first step in turning them into a long term advocate for your cause.  4. Don’t forget to thank your donors too!  We all know that with each new donor comes the opportunity to raise further funds for your group, so make sure you thank them as well. Make a note on your database of which donors came from which fundraisers, as this will help you to better personalise your communications and provide an indication of what kind of fundraising event may appeal to them in the future.  The focus of these tips is to make sure your fundraiser feels appreciated, that their efforts have made a difference and crucially that they are a helpful part of your cause. By doing this you are much more likely to fundraise for you again and hopefully encourage their friends and family to do the same! Further Information If you are still looking for fundraisers or want to know how to support them while they fundraise for you them during then check out our previous blogs or contact us at help@localgiving.com  You can also click here to download this poster   
    1604 Posted by Fergus Simpson
  • How you interact with your fundraiser once their event is over is crucial when it comes to converting them into a long-term supporter. In this blog we will be looking at 4 simple ways to keep your fundraisers engaged in your charity and your cause. 1. Publicly thank them for their support Use social media, emails or a newsletter to publicly thank your fundraiser for their efforts. Let everyone know how much they raised, what they did to raise it and, crucially, how much it means to your charity.  Thanking your fundraiser publicly also gives them a chance to share your message of appreciation with their personal networks, creating extra publicity for your charity and potentially inspiring a whole new group of people to fundraise for you in the future. 2. Invite them to visit you in person A great way to build a relationship with your fundraiser is to invite them to a team meeting or event and thank them face-to-face for their efforts. If possible, introduce your fundraisers to beneficiaries to remind them what their funds will be going towards and how people's lives will be positively affected. Read about how one group, York Carers, did just that for their fundraiser, Tony Ives.  3. Keep them up to date with your progress If your fundraiser was raising money for a particular project then send them updates of how it is going. Including images and testimonials from people the project has helped can be a great way of adding meaning to these updates. If you are sharing this information publicly then make sure you acknowledge which fundraiser(s) made it possible. Thanking your fundraisers in this way lets them know their efforts where worthwhile and could be the first step in turning them into a long term advocate for your cause.  4. Don’t forget to thank your donors too!  We all know that with each new donor comes the opportunity to raise further funds for your group, so make sure you thank them as well. Make a note on your database of which donors came from which fundraisers, as this will help you to better personalise your communications and provide an indication of what kind of fundraising event may appeal to them in the future.  The focus of these tips is to make sure your fundraiser feels appreciated, that their efforts have made a difference and crucially that they are a helpful part of your cause. By doing this you are much more likely to fundraise for you again and hopefully encourage their friends and family to do the same! Further Information If you are still looking for fundraisers or want to know how to support them while they fundraise for you them during then check out our previous blogs or contact us at help@localgiving.com  You can also click here to download this poster   
    Jun 24, 2015 1604
  • 19 Aug 2015
    Thinking of what you can do to fundraise for charity can sometimes be harder than the challenge itself! To help get those ideas flowing we've created an A - Z of fun activities you can do that'll be sure to get your friends and family to support you and your chosen charity. Think outside the box Running a marathon is an amazing achievement, but if running isn't for you there are loads of other ways you can raise money for a local charity. On Localgiving we've had all sorts of wacky ideas including eating 3 whole chickens in an hour and sitting in a baked bean bath while having your head shaved plus some creative ideas such as a vote on which songs a choir will sing at an event. Think local! Once you've come up with your idea all that's left is finding an amazing local charity or community group to fundraise for - and that's where we come in. We've got thousands of local voluntary groups that would love your support! Find one in your area by simply entering your postcode into our search and scrolling through the groups closest to you.                       
    7660 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Thinking of what you can do to fundraise for charity can sometimes be harder than the challenge itself! To help get those ideas flowing we've created an A - Z of fun activities you can do that'll be sure to get your friends and family to support you and your chosen charity. Think outside the box Running a marathon is an amazing achievement, but if running isn't for you there are loads of other ways you can raise money for a local charity. On Localgiving we've had all sorts of wacky ideas including eating 3 whole chickens in an hour and sitting in a baked bean bath while having your head shaved plus some creative ideas such as a vote on which songs a choir will sing at an event. Think local! Once you've come up with your idea all that's left is finding an amazing local charity or community group to fundraise for - and that's where we come in. We've got thousands of local voluntary groups that would love your support! Find one in your area by simply entering your postcode into our search and scrolling through the groups closest to you.                       
    Aug 19, 2015 7660
  • 22 Jun 2015
    Mick Pembleton has held on to the top spot on the #Localhero leader board from day one. His skydive for Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW has, so far, attracted 84 unique donors and raised £1,357 for the charity. We spoke to Mick about his involvement with Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW and how the #Localhero campaign has helped his fundraising.  Why Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW?  Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW train assistance dogs to increase the independence and wellbeing of disabled young people and children on the Isle of Wight. Mick first heard of the charity through a friend of his who worked in their offices as well as numerous neighbours who volunteered. He said he was drawn to Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW primarily because they were locally based.   I like the thought that the money raised goes to a small, local charity where it can have a real effect rather than a national one, where the money might get 'lost' amid general costs - this feels much more personal. Mick had been to many previous fundraising events for the charity as well as helping out with moving and collecting donated items from local charity shops. He was already keen to do a skydive, and had one booked in for June. He then had a conversation with the charity about how they were looking for a #Localhero and felt the opportunity was too good to miss; especially as the charities new training grounds are in the hangar of the airport where he will be doing his jump! Mick said on doing his skydive The idea of freefalling is appealing and I've always fancied base jumping and bungy jumping but I am very scared of heights. I can't wait to do the jump but it will definitely be a once in a lifetime thing! How do the charity support you?  Mick told us that Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW have been hugely supportive of him as a fundraiser I really didn't want to go round asking people to sponsor me with a sponsor sheet but with the Localgiving link I could tell people the details then it's up to them if they wanted to go ahead - it doesn't feel like I'm pressurising anyone. Ability Dogs 4 Young People designed and printed some leaflets to give out and have been encouraging people to sponsor me on my behalf. They also put posters up around the airport and given some to some of their supporters to display. They also put details of the jump on their website, Facebook Page and Twitter. The charity invited me to the Training Centre after puppy class to meet all the puppies and volunteer puppy parents and I got to chat to everyone involved and they will all be coming along with the puppies to watch me on the day! Mick is hoping to raise enough money buy a new puppy for the charity and fund its training for the first year I can raise a bit more money and somehow hold on to the top spot on the leader board I might reach £2500 which is exactly half of what's needed so that would fund it's first year with the charity. How has #Localhero helped?  We also spoke to Mick about the #Localhero campaign and whether he felt it had had an impact on his fundraising event The #LocalHero Leader board has definitely helped in spreading the word - having the possibility of getting an extra £1000 has really inspired everybody. I know the charity has been explaining to people who don't know me that this is a really effective way of donating because their £5 could turn into £1000! So as well as getting support from my friends and family I've had people sponsor me who want to support the charity. It's also been great advertising for the charity to be on the Leader board with Localgiving and being mentioned on Twitter and such. Mick will be doing his skydive on Tuesday 23rd June, help MICK'S BIG JUMP for Ability Dogs 4 Young People win some extra money for Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW and keep him at the top of the #LocalHero Leaderboard. Each new donor = another point in the competition so any donation, big or small, can make a huge difference. Support Mick now:  https://localgiving.com/fundraising/micksbigjump  
    2129 Posted by Fergus Simpson
  • Mick Pembleton has held on to the top spot on the #Localhero leader board from day one. His skydive for Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW has, so far, attracted 84 unique donors and raised £1,357 for the charity. We spoke to Mick about his involvement with Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW and how the #Localhero campaign has helped his fundraising.  Why Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW?  Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW train assistance dogs to increase the independence and wellbeing of disabled young people and children on the Isle of Wight. Mick first heard of the charity through a friend of his who worked in their offices as well as numerous neighbours who volunteered. He said he was drawn to Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW primarily because they were locally based.   I like the thought that the money raised goes to a small, local charity where it can have a real effect rather than a national one, where the money might get 'lost' amid general costs - this feels much more personal. Mick had been to many previous fundraising events for the charity as well as helping out with moving and collecting donated items from local charity shops. He was already keen to do a skydive, and had one booked in for June. He then had a conversation with the charity about how they were looking for a #Localhero and felt the opportunity was too good to miss; especially as the charities new training grounds are in the hangar of the airport where he will be doing his jump! Mick said on doing his skydive The idea of freefalling is appealing and I've always fancied base jumping and bungy jumping but I am very scared of heights. I can't wait to do the jump but it will definitely be a once in a lifetime thing! How do the charity support you?  Mick told us that Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW have been hugely supportive of him as a fundraiser I really didn't want to go round asking people to sponsor me with a sponsor sheet but with the Localgiving link I could tell people the details then it's up to them if they wanted to go ahead - it doesn't feel like I'm pressurising anyone. Ability Dogs 4 Young People designed and printed some leaflets to give out and have been encouraging people to sponsor me on my behalf. They also put posters up around the airport and given some to some of their supporters to display. They also put details of the jump on their website, Facebook Page and Twitter. The charity invited me to the Training Centre after puppy class to meet all the puppies and volunteer puppy parents and I got to chat to everyone involved and they will all be coming along with the puppies to watch me on the day! Mick is hoping to raise enough money buy a new puppy for the charity and fund its training for the first year I can raise a bit more money and somehow hold on to the top spot on the leader board I might reach £2500 which is exactly half of what's needed so that would fund it's first year with the charity. How has #Localhero helped?  We also spoke to Mick about the #Localhero campaign and whether he felt it had had an impact on his fundraising event The #LocalHero Leader board has definitely helped in spreading the word - having the possibility of getting an extra £1000 has really inspired everybody. I know the charity has been explaining to people who don't know me that this is a really effective way of donating because their £5 could turn into £1000! So as well as getting support from my friends and family I've had people sponsor me who want to support the charity. It's also been great advertising for the charity to be on the Leader board with Localgiving and being mentioned on Twitter and such. Mick will be doing his skydive on Tuesday 23rd June, help MICK'S BIG JUMP for Ability Dogs 4 Young People win some extra money for Ability Dogs 4 Young People IoW and keep him at the top of the #LocalHero Leaderboard. Each new donor = another point in the competition so any donation, big or small, can make a huge difference. Support Mick now:  https://localgiving.com/fundraising/micksbigjump  
    Jun 22, 2015 2129
  • 18 Jun 2015
    The smartphone revolution arguably started with the launch of the iPhone, although to be fair, they’d been around for years. IBM’s Simon phone might claim to be the world’s first, hailing from as far back as 1992. It’s estimated that by 2016 there will be two billion smartphones in the world, making them one of the most widely adopted pieces of technology ever. Enter Near Field Communications The plethora of functions and applications available in today’s smartphones is mind-boggling, and I’m pretty sure that the majority of us only use a tiny fraction of their capacity. One feature that has crept into phones over the years almost unnoticed is Near Field Communications (NFC) – the ability for a phone to pass information between an NFC “tag” or terminal. This is the same technology used in modern credit cards that allows you to “tap to pay”. Although most new phones have some form of NFC functionality, including the iPhone6, the chances are you probably haven’t used it much. After all, what is it good for? At Localgiving we’re keen to anticipate trends (technological and otherwise) so that we can understand how they can be harnessed to help local charities and community groups. And while NFC is currently comparatively unknown, we think there may be some interesting opportunities in the future. Smart Buckets! For example, if you’re a local charity, one of your funding strategies may be to collect cash from people in the street. We’re all used to seeing collectors in t-shirts with brightly coloured buckets, and it’s a straightforward way of raising money. But while it’s easy to do, cash collection comes with some big disadvantages – you’re unlikely to collect donor contact details and so will be unable to remain in touch with them, and Gift Aid claiming has historically been problematic, although the Gift Aid Small Donations Scheme (GASDS) has helped a little. But fewer and fewer people carry cash with them, so while they may be willing, they can’t donate cash if they don’t have any. Can technology be deployed to overcome these issues? This could be a job for NFC! Imagine if, alongside your collection bucket, you have an NFC tag, which, when tapped by a donor’s smartphone, opens up the donation page on the Localgiving website on their phone’s browser. It’s very quick (see the video), and within a few seconds a potential donor can be deciding on the amount to donate, making a Gift Aid claim, and even setting up a direct debit if they’re so inclined. As an adjunct to traditional cash collections, NFC could be very useful by increasing donations and widening the circle of supporters.  The NFC tag that is used to trigger the donation is unpowered, costs under £1 and can be easily programmed by any NFC-enabled smartphone. Not everyone will donate this way of course, and not everyone has NFC in their phone, but in time things will change and, if the industry trends are to be believed, most phones will eventually support NFC.       Want to try it? Localgiving will be running a series of trials to establish whether the technology can be made to work in a practical way and we’re seeking volunteers. So if this sparks an interest, please get in touch with me via the Localgiving help line, or by email and I’ll be happy to explain more.
    1324 Posted by Steve Mallinson
  • The smartphone revolution arguably started with the launch of the iPhone, although to be fair, they’d been around for years. IBM’s Simon phone might claim to be the world’s first, hailing from as far back as 1992. It’s estimated that by 2016 there will be two billion smartphones in the world, making them one of the most widely adopted pieces of technology ever. Enter Near Field Communications The plethora of functions and applications available in today’s smartphones is mind-boggling, and I’m pretty sure that the majority of us only use a tiny fraction of their capacity. One feature that has crept into phones over the years almost unnoticed is Near Field Communications (NFC) – the ability for a phone to pass information between an NFC “tag” or terminal. This is the same technology used in modern credit cards that allows you to “tap to pay”. Although most new phones have some form of NFC functionality, including the iPhone6, the chances are you probably haven’t used it much. After all, what is it good for? At Localgiving we’re keen to anticipate trends (technological and otherwise) so that we can understand how they can be harnessed to help local charities and community groups. And while NFC is currently comparatively unknown, we think there may be some interesting opportunities in the future. Smart Buckets! For example, if you’re a local charity, one of your funding strategies may be to collect cash from people in the street. We’re all used to seeing collectors in t-shirts with brightly coloured buckets, and it’s a straightforward way of raising money. But while it’s easy to do, cash collection comes with some big disadvantages – you’re unlikely to collect donor contact details and so will be unable to remain in touch with them, and Gift Aid claiming has historically been problematic, although the Gift Aid Small Donations Scheme (GASDS) has helped a little. But fewer and fewer people carry cash with them, so while they may be willing, they can’t donate cash if they don’t have any. Can technology be deployed to overcome these issues? This could be a job for NFC! Imagine if, alongside your collection bucket, you have an NFC tag, which, when tapped by a donor’s smartphone, opens up the donation page on the Localgiving website on their phone’s browser. It’s very quick (see the video), and within a few seconds a potential donor can be deciding on the amount to donate, making a Gift Aid claim, and even setting up a direct debit if they’re so inclined. As an adjunct to traditional cash collections, NFC could be very useful by increasing donations and widening the circle of supporters.  The NFC tag that is used to trigger the donation is unpowered, costs under £1 and can be easily programmed by any NFC-enabled smartphone. Not everyone will donate this way of course, and not everyone has NFC in their phone, but in time things will change and, if the industry trends are to be believed, most phones will eventually support NFC.       Want to try it? Localgiving will be running a series of trials to establish whether the technology can be made to work in a practical way and we’re seeking volunteers. So if this sparks an interest, please get in touch with me via the Localgiving help line, or by email and I’ll be happy to explain more.
    Jun 18, 2015 1324
  • 11 Jun 2015
     Small Charity Week 2015  “Never doubt that a small, group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.  Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has” - Margaret Mead From inception to delivery small charities should never cease to amaze us all.  At the Foundation for Social Improvement (FSI) we are privileged to meet with, talk to, be inspired by and support thousands of small charities each year.  I hear phenomenal stories of passionate, determined, creative and yes sometimes crazy founders.  That particular breed of person who instead of wondering who will do this or that to help others, instead wonder what can I do, how can I help and how can I get others to help. This is often how small charities come into being, someone somewhere sees something that needs doing or a wrong that needs righting and they set about changing the world - and you know they usually do! In the UK we are extremely privileged to have a vibrant, tenacious and effective Small Charity Sector, all 140,000 of them scattered across the country all working hard to support those in our society who are least able to support themselves.  Supporting those who for whatever reason have found themselves in a position that they cannot get out of, cannot control or cope with, not without help and support. Imagine: A young child being bullied at school with no one to turn to for support. An older person, isolated in their own home never speaking to another soul for weeks on end. A young person sofa surfing or homeless, afraid and in need of safe place to stay. An animal forgotten and left starving and neglected in a hut at the end of someone’s garden. A wooded glade cut down, whose special ecosystem is gone forever and its beauty lost to future generations. Or a villager in Tanzania walking 10 miles each day to bring fresh drinking water to their children. For the young and the old, for animals for our environment for those in our own country and for those across the globe, small charities provide hope and a lifeline to the future. Small charities have been coping in, and to a great extent are still coping in exceptional times, as the demand for their services increases, as the workload of both staff and volunteers rises and as funding to deliver their services is increasingly difficult to find.  In the face of all of these challenges, often despite the challenges they face, small charities continue to be optimistic, continue to stretch their resources to meet the needs of their beneficiaries.  They simply put their communities needs before all else. Many small charities exist to provide services the state chooses not to, or that the private sector sees as unprofitable. If there is a need not being met in a local community then you can take bets that it will be a small charity that ‘fills the gap’. Small charities in the UK achieve amazing results but now more than ever before small charities need to remain determined, committed, and passionate about what they do because more people than ever need their help. Want to support a local small charity? You’re spoilt for choice on how to show your love for your favourite small charities: Fundraise through Localgiving - set up your page now and fundraise throughout June for the chance to win your chosen cause an extra £1,000 through the #LocalHero campaign. Volunteer with a small charity near you and help to make a huge difference. Post a message on Twitter or Facebook about why you love your favourite small charity from the 15th-21st June using #ILoveSmallCharities and you could help them win cash prizes. For more information about Small Charity Week and how you can get behind your local small charities go to www.smallcharityweek.com ---- Pauline Broomhead is CEO of the FSI, a charity providing free support services to small charities across the country.  
    2754 Posted by Pauline Broomhead
  •  Small Charity Week 2015  “Never doubt that a small, group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.  Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has” - Margaret Mead From inception to delivery small charities should never cease to amaze us all.  At the Foundation for Social Improvement (FSI) we are privileged to meet with, talk to, be inspired by and support thousands of small charities each year.  I hear phenomenal stories of passionate, determined, creative and yes sometimes crazy founders.  That particular breed of person who instead of wondering who will do this or that to help others, instead wonder what can I do, how can I help and how can I get others to help. This is often how small charities come into being, someone somewhere sees something that needs doing or a wrong that needs righting and they set about changing the world - and you know they usually do! In the UK we are extremely privileged to have a vibrant, tenacious and effective Small Charity Sector, all 140,000 of them scattered across the country all working hard to support those in our society who are least able to support themselves.  Supporting those who for whatever reason have found themselves in a position that they cannot get out of, cannot control or cope with, not without help and support. Imagine: A young child being bullied at school with no one to turn to for support. An older person, isolated in their own home never speaking to another soul for weeks on end. A young person sofa surfing or homeless, afraid and in need of safe place to stay. An animal forgotten and left starving and neglected in a hut at the end of someone’s garden. A wooded glade cut down, whose special ecosystem is gone forever and its beauty lost to future generations. Or a villager in Tanzania walking 10 miles each day to bring fresh drinking water to their children. For the young and the old, for animals for our environment for those in our own country and for those across the globe, small charities provide hope and a lifeline to the future. Small charities have been coping in, and to a great extent are still coping in exceptional times, as the demand for their services increases, as the workload of both staff and volunteers rises and as funding to deliver their services is increasingly difficult to find.  In the face of all of these challenges, often despite the challenges they face, small charities continue to be optimistic, continue to stretch their resources to meet the needs of their beneficiaries.  They simply put their communities needs before all else. Many small charities exist to provide services the state chooses not to, or that the private sector sees as unprofitable. If there is a need not being met in a local community then you can take bets that it will be a small charity that ‘fills the gap’. Small charities in the UK achieve amazing results but now more than ever before small charities need to remain determined, committed, and passionate about what they do because more people than ever need their help. Want to support a local small charity? You’re spoilt for choice on how to show your love for your favourite small charities: Fundraise through Localgiving - set up your page now and fundraise throughout June for the chance to win your chosen cause an extra £1,000 through the #LocalHero campaign. Volunteer with a small charity near you and help to make a huge difference. Post a message on Twitter or Facebook about why you love your favourite small charity from the 15th-21st June using #ILoveSmallCharities and you could help them win cash prizes. For more information about Small Charity Week and how you can get behind your local small charities go to www.smallcharityweek.com ---- Pauline Broomhead is CEO of the FSI, a charity providing free support services to small charities across the country.  
    Jun 11, 2015 2754
  • 10 Jun 2015
    The village of Haddon in Cambridgeshire has the dubious distinction of being the place that produced the country’s most expensive car repair ever. In 2011 Rowan Atkinson drove his Mclaren F1 supercar into a tree and a lamppost, which fortunately was not fatal, but certainly produced a headache (and probably an embarrassment) of monstrous proportions for the TV star. Reminiscent of an episode of Mr Bean, it was a good example of life imitating fiction. A year later the repair bill stood at £1m. Earlier this year Mr Atkinson concluded that it was time for someone else to enjoy the car, and he put it up for sale, with the expectation that the successful buyer would be paying around £10m.  Other ways to spend £10m In the world of supercars then, £10m doesn’t go very far. But in the world of local charities, £10m is an astronomical sum that can produce amazing results.  Flicking through the charity pages on our website, I’m constantly surprised at the many ways our members are deploying their funds.  Toys for children in respite at Konnections @ the Kerith in Bracknell Forest,  holiday caravan rental for HMH cancer patients in Scotland and the North East, vital mental health teaching by Aware Defeat Depression for frontline workers in Belfast, weeks of food and shelter for service leavers in Wales; the list goes on and on. Local charities can put relatively small amounts of money to incredibly good use, and that’s why we’re so happy to have broken the £10m barrier, because we know it’s made a difference to thousands of people across the length and breadth of the country. If you’ve got £10m to spend, surely this is a better kind of impact than the one the tree and lamppost endured in Haddon, Cambridgeshire!
    1224 Posted by Steve Mallinson
  • The village of Haddon in Cambridgeshire has the dubious distinction of being the place that produced the country’s most expensive car repair ever. In 2011 Rowan Atkinson drove his Mclaren F1 supercar into a tree and a lamppost, which fortunately was not fatal, but certainly produced a headache (and probably an embarrassment) of monstrous proportions for the TV star. Reminiscent of an episode of Mr Bean, it was a good example of life imitating fiction. A year later the repair bill stood at £1m. Earlier this year Mr Atkinson concluded that it was time for someone else to enjoy the car, and he put it up for sale, with the expectation that the successful buyer would be paying around £10m.  Other ways to spend £10m In the world of supercars then, £10m doesn’t go very far. But in the world of local charities, £10m is an astronomical sum that can produce amazing results.  Flicking through the charity pages on our website, I’m constantly surprised at the many ways our members are deploying their funds.  Toys for children in respite at Konnections @ the Kerith in Bracknell Forest,  holiday caravan rental for HMH cancer patients in Scotland and the North East, vital mental health teaching by Aware Defeat Depression for frontline workers in Belfast, weeks of food and shelter for service leavers in Wales; the list goes on and on. Local charities can put relatively small amounts of money to incredibly good use, and that’s why we’re so happy to have broken the £10m barrier, because we know it’s made a difference to thousands of people across the length and breadth of the country. If you’ve got £10m to spend, surely this is a better kind of impact than the one the tree and lamppost endured in Haddon, Cambridgeshire!
    Jun 10, 2015 1224
  • 09 Jun 2015
    Finding supporters to fundraise for your charity is a brilliant way to increase donations and promote your cause. Knowing how to find these fundraisers is a crucial skill for any charity (see Follow These 6 Easy Steps & Find Your Next Fundraiser) but it is equally important to know how to to properly support them once they've decided to raise money for you.  By supporting your fundraisers you can motivate them to raise more money, better promote your charity and, crucially, create a lasting relastionship and a long-term supporter. Here are 6 quick tips to help you do just that:      1. Thank them immediately Help your fundraisers to feel supported and motivated by thanking them as soon as they set up their fundraising page. Send them an email to show your appreciation and make them feel part of a team, while also reminding them how much you appreciate their efforts. When thanking fundraisers make sure you reiterate what their support will mean to your charity, ideally with specific examples of what the money they raise will go towards; images would also be a great addition. These "thank yous" will help them to visualise their goal and hopefully motivate them to raise even more!      2. Help promote their page Add the unique Localgiving URL for your fundraiser's page to your website, email signature, social media and other promotional materials. This helps to support them while also encoruaging new donations and showing potential supporters that you have a relationship with your fundraisers. Creating a public, as well as a personal, narrative between you and your fundraisers is they key way to show your support as well as encourage donations.      3. Create a sense of community If you have more than one fundraiser, then put them in touch with one another. For example, if two people are running the same fun run or marathon they may be interested in training together and supporting one another. Similarly, you can invite them to meet the people who will benefit from the money they raise - this will help to inspire and motivate them. When it comes to fundraising, people often respond better to group activities. By bringing your fundraisers together you can inspire a sense of solidarity for your cause - this is also more likely to encourage your fundraisers to get their friends and families involved, creating more fundraisers and ultimately more donations for your charity!       4. Make them feel special Publicly celebrate their milestones on social media and personally celebrate them via email. Milestones may include their first donation or a quarter of a way to their fundraising total. By doing this they will not only be aware of your appreciation but will have something to share with their personal networks; motivating those friends and family members to give and develop a greater awareness of your cause. Similarly, personalise your support: if they are running a marathon or doing a bike race then send them specific tips or advice related to their event. This type of advice is easily accessible online. Finding relevant information and sending it to your fundraiser shows you’ve gone the extra mile to build that relationship.  5. Ask them for feedback Ensure your relationship with your fundraisers is a dialogue. What would help them with their training or further inspire them to fundraise? Have their networks of friends and families given any feedback about their fundraising efforts or your cause? This shows you are interested in their progress and, importantly, will also help you to better personalise your appeals to supporters in future.    6. Highlight their story Feature their story on your website, your newsletter or social media outlets. Encourage them to send their unique story e.g why they're fundraising for you; they could even set up a personal blog to update people on their progress. Also follow them on social media so you can stay up to date with their progress and ensure they have everything they need such as charity information/branded materials.    Building meaningful relationships with your fundraisers is key to generating longer-term support. By showing how much you appreciate them you can instil a sense of pride in what they are doing and ensure that they feel their contribution is making a real positive difference. We hope these quick tips help you to ensure your fundraisers feel fully supported. With a little luck, they might fundraise for you again in the future and even encourage their friends and families to do so too!   Further information and material        If you want to learn more about supporting your fundraisers, as well as a range of tips on how to make the most of online fundraising, then click here to find slides from our 'Inspiring Online Fundraisers' webinar that we hosted during Small Charities Week.  Click here to download the poster                      
    1939 Posted by Fergus Simpson
  • Finding supporters to fundraise for your charity is a brilliant way to increase donations and promote your cause. Knowing how to find these fundraisers is a crucial skill for any charity (see Follow These 6 Easy Steps & Find Your Next Fundraiser) but it is equally important to know how to to properly support them once they've decided to raise money for you.  By supporting your fundraisers you can motivate them to raise more money, better promote your charity and, crucially, create a lasting relastionship and a long-term supporter. Here are 6 quick tips to help you do just that:      1. Thank them immediately Help your fundraisers to feel supported and motivated by thanking them as soon as they set up their fundraising page. Send them an email to show your appreciation and make them feel part of a team, while also reminding them how much you appreciate their efforts. When thanking fundraisers make sure you reiterate what their support will mean to your charity, ideally with specific examples of what the money they raise will go towards; images would also be a great addition. These "thank yous" will help them to visualise their goal and hopefully motivate them to raise even more!      2. Help promote their page Add the unique Localgiving URL for your fundraiser's page to your website, email signature, social media and other promotional materials. This helps to support them while also encoruaging new donations and showing potential supporters that you have a relationship with your fundraisers. Creating a public, as well as a personal, narrative between you and your fundraisers is they key way to show your support as well as encourage donations.      3. Create a sense of community If you have more than one fundraiser, then put them in touch with one another. For example, if two people are running the same fun run or marathon they may be interested in training together and supporting one another. Similarly, you can invite them to meet the people who will benefit from the money they raise - this will help to inspire and motivate them. When it comes to fundraising, people often respond better to group activities. By bringing your fundraisers together you can inspire a sense of solidarity for your cause - this is also more likely to encourage your fundraisers to get their friends and families involved, creating more fundraisers and ultimately more donations for your charity!       4. Make them feel special Publicly celebrate their milestones on social media and personally celebrate them via email. Milestones may include their first donation or a quarter of a way to their fundraising total. By doing this they will not only be aware of your appreciation but will have something to share with their personal networks; motivating those friends and family members to give and develop a greater awareness of your cause. Similarly, personalise your support: if they are running a marathon or doing a bike race then send them specific tips or advice related to their event. This type of advice is easily accessible online. Finding relevant information and sending it to your fundraiser shows you’ve gone the extra mile to build that relationship.  5. Ask them for feedback Ensure your relationship with your fundraisers is a dialogue. What would help them with their training or further inspire them to fundraise? Have their networks of friends and families given any feedback about their fundraising efforts or your cause? This shows you are interested in their progress and, importantly, will also help you to better personalise your appeals to supporters in future.    6. Highlight their story Feature their story on your website, your newsletter or social media outlets. Encourage them to send their unique story e.g why they're fundraising for you; they could even set up a personal blog to update people on their progress. Also follow them on social media so you can stay up to date with their progress and ensure they have everything they need such as charity information/branded materials.    Building meaningful relationships with your fundraisers is key to generating longer-term support. By showing how much you appreciate them you can instil a sense of pride in what they are doing and ensure that they feel their contribution is making a real positive difference. We hope these quick tips help you to ensure your fundraisers feel fully supported. With a little luck, they might fundraise for you again in the future and even encourage their friends and families to do so too!   Further information and material        If you want to learn more about supporting your fundraisers, as well as a range of tips on how to make the most of online fundraising, then click here to find slides from our 'Inspiring Online Fundraisers' webinar that we hosted during Small Charities Week.  Click here to download the poster                      
    Jun 09, 2015 1939
  • 03 Jun 2015
    We all know that individual fundraisers raise lots of money for charities, but it's important to remember that they are also fantastic at spreading goodwill and encouraging support for worthy causes. Fundraisers can be of particular benefit to local charities by raising awareness amongst the community and inspiring more local people to get involved with the group's work. Each fundraising page set up through Localgiving typically attracts 10 new donors and raises an average of over £400, so following these 6 easy steps to inspire someone in your community to fundraise on your behalf is certainly worth the effort! 1. Build your story The first step towards successfully inspiring any new type of supporter is to build a strong, clear and cohesive story around your organisation. One easy trick to help you structure your story is to use the 5 W's and 1 H technique: Who, What, Why, When, Where and How.   Who: Who does your organisation help?  What: What are your objectives? What initiatives do you currently have in place? Why: Why was your organisation founded? What are the key issues that it addresses? When: When was your organisation founded? When do you deliver specific activities? Where: Where do you operate? Be specific within the local area. How: How do you meet your goals and objectives? How do you run your initiatives? Try to use the above questions to paint a compelling picture about how your group makes a difference within your community. Make it clear how things would be different if your group did not exist and try to include your passion for the work you do to inspire support from others. 2. Evidence your impact Evidencing impact is vital to show would-be fundraisers how the money they raise on your behalf will be put to good use. If someone is to put themselves through a gruelling marathon to support your work, it is critical that they understand the impact that their actions can have! One way to do this is to use real-life examples of how previous funding has been used to demonstrate the "return on investment". The key to evidencing impact effectively is to follow the story through to it's conclusion. Try to answer the following questions: How much funding did you raise? Include the total amount and how your raised it – if it was through public donations, say so, this shows that you already have people supporting you, which in turn is likely to inspire trust and support from others. What did you do with the funding? This could be a clear-cut, like buying a new tool or resource, or it could be more abstract, like going towards energy bills or rent. Either way, make sure to be clear about how the money was spent. What was the result of this for the people you help? If you were able to buy a new resource, evidence how this affected your service users – were you able to help more people? Provide better help for those that you already support? Deliver a specific event or service? If your funding went towards your core costs, evidence how the money enabled you to continue to help the people you already support. The most effective examples will use numbers and statistics to clearly show your impact.  For example, a community transport group might say the following:  In 2014 we were able to raise a total of £2,500 through individual donations and fundraisers. The money enabled us to upgrade our minibus with features to enable wheelchair users to easily access the bus. This has resulted in a 20% increase in the number of people we are able to help, meaning that an additional 30 people have been assisted to get from A to B over the past 6 months. 3. Use case studies Now that you've given clear examples of how the money you've raised in the past has been spent, using numbers and statistics to show your return on investment, it's time to connect with your supporters on a more emotional level. Case studies are an ideal way to do this. Think of a case study as a story – you can try using the 5 W's and 1 H technique described above to help you build a compelling picture of how your organisation has helped an individual or group of people in your community. Quotes and testimonials from service users can help to bring your story to life and will engage potential supporters on a human level, helping them to become invested in your work.  4. Create a connection Once you've fully explained your organisation and given real-life examples of the impact it has, it's time to tell your own story. Nothing will speak to someone as much as your own passion for the work you do. Explain your personal motivation for being involved and what your "a-ha moment" was that provided the catalyst for where you are today. This will help you to explain the real meaning of the work you do and inspire the same passion in someone else.  5. Make the ask Hopefully, by following the above steps you will have won over a whole host of new supporters! Now it's time to convert them into fundraisers to spread your message even further. People will often be invested in something but not know how to best get involved. The key is to simply make the ask! Get in touch with supporters through as many channels as possible. You can download and edit this fundraising poster to include your Localgiving URL, then print it out and stick it around your community.  Use email and social media to quickly spread the word - don't be shy! Let people know that you are looking for fundraisers and ask them to share your message with their friends and families as well. You could even approach local businesses and ask for their support – they will often be looking for team-building exercises and fundraising can be a great option! 6. Have a clear call to action Make it as easy as possible for people to get involved. Make sure you include the link to your Localgiving page in all of your communications and make it clear that you are asking people to fundraise for you. You could even go one step further and book some spaces at a local sporting event or host your own challenge and ask people to take part.  If you're unable to organise something yourself, try to provide ideas and examples of challenges that people can get involved in to raise money on your behalf. Some ideas could include setting up a birthday giving page, having a fancy dress day at the local school or even a potato eating competition at the local pub! The only limit is your imagination! Need more help or advice? We hope these 6 steps will help you to inspire more fundraisers to get involved with your organisation and raise money on your behalf. To help you remember the key steps, you can download and print out this poster. Remember, if you need any help with your fundraising through Localgiving, you can contact us for free from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Monday - Friday on 0300 111 2340 or via help@localgiving.com and one of our team of qualified fundraisers will be happy to provide advice and support! 
    3146 Posted by Lou Coady
  • We all know that individual fundraisers raise lots of money for charities, but it's important to remember that they are also fantastic at spreading goodwill and encouraging support for worthy causes. Fundraisers can be of particular benefit to local charities by raising awareness amongst the community and inspiring more local people to get involved with the group's work. Each fundraising page set up through Localgiving typically attracts 10 new donors and raises an average of over £400, so following these 6 easy steps to inspire someone in your community to fundraise on your behalf is certainly worth the effort! 1. Build your story The first step towards successfully inspiring any new type of supporter is to build a strong, clear and cohesive story around your organisation. One easy trick to help you structure your story is to use the 5 W's and 1 H technique: Who, What, Why, When, Where and How.   Who: Who does your organisation help?  What: What are your objectives? What initiatives do you currently have in place? Why: Why was your organisation founded? What are the key issues that it addresses? When: When was your organisation founded? When do you deliver specific activities? Where: Where do you operate? Be specific within the local area. How: How do you meet your goals and objectives? How do you run your initiatives? Try to use the above questions to paint a compelling picture about how your group makes a difference within your community. Make it clear how things would be different if your group did not exist and try to include your passion for the work you do to inspire support from others. 2. Evidence your impact Evidencing impact is vital to show would-be fundraisers how the money they raise on your behalf will be put to good use. If someone is to put themselves through a gruelling marathon to support your work, it is critical that they understand the impact that their actions can have! One way to do this is to use real-life examples of how previous funding has been used to demonstrate the "return on investment". The key to evidencing impact effectively is to follow the story through to it's conclusion. Try to answer the following questions: How much funding did you raise? Include the total amount and how your raised it – if it was through public donations, say so, this shows that you already have people supporting you, which in turn is likely to inspire trust and support from others. What did you do with the funding? This could be a clear-cut, like buying a new tool or resource, or it could be more abstract, like going towards energy bills or rent. Either way, make sure to be clear about how the money was spent. What was the result of this for the people you help? If you were able to buy a new resource, evidence how this affected your service users – were you able to help more people? Provide better help for those that you already support? Deliver a specific event or service? If your funding went towards your core costs, evidence how the money enabled you to continue to help the people you already support. The most effective examples will use numbers and statistics to clearly show your impact.  For example, a community transport group might say the following:  In 2014 we were able to raise a total of £2,500 through individual donations and fundraisers. The money enabled us to upgrade our minibus with features to enable wheelchair users to easily access the bus. This has resulted in a 20% increase in the number of people we are able to help, meaning that an additional 30 people have been assisted to get from A to B over the past 6 months. 3. Use case studies Now that you've given clear examples of how the money you've raised in the past has been spent, using numbers and statistics to show your return on investment, it's time to connect with your supporters on a more emotional level. Case studies are an ideal way to do this. Think of a case study as a story – you can try using the 5 W's and 1 H technique described above to help you build a compelling picture of how your organisation has helped an individual or group of people in your community. Quotes and testimonials from service users can help to bring your story to life and will engage potential supporters on a human level, helping them to become invested in your work.  4. Create a connection Once you've fully explained your organisation and given real-life examples of the impact it has, it's time to tell your own story. Nothing will speak to someone as much as your own passion for the work you do. Explain your personal motivation for being involved and what your "a-ha moment" was that provided the catalyst for where you are today. This will help you to explain the real meaning of the work you do and inspire the same passion in someone else.  5. Make the ask Hopefully, by following the above steps you will have won over a whole host of new supporters! Now it's time to convert them into fundraisers to spread your message even further. People will often be invested in something but not know how to best get involved. The key is to simply make the ask! Get in touch with supporters through as many channels as possible. You can download and edit this fundraising poster to include your Localgiving URL, then print it out and stick it around your community.  Use email and social media to quickly spread the word - don't be shy! Let people know that you are looking for fundraisers and ask them to share your message with their friends and families as well. You could even approach local businesses and ask for their support – they will often be looking for team-building exercises and fundraising can be a great option! 6. Have a clear call to action Make it as easy as possible for people to get involved. Make sure you include the link to your Localgiving page in all of your communications and make it clear that you are asking people to fundraise for you. You could even go one step further and book some spaces at a local sporting event or host your own challenge and ask people to take part.  If you're unable to organise something yourself, try to provide ideas and examples of challenges that people can get involved in to raise money on your behalf. Some ideas could include setting up a birthday giving page, having a fancy dress day at the local school or even a potato eating competition at the local pub! The only limit is your imagination! Need more help or advice? We hope these 6 steps will help you to inspire more fundraisers to get involved with your organisation and raise money on your behalf. To help you remember the key steps, you can download and print out this poster. Remember, if you need any help with your fundraising through Localgiving, you can contact us for free from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Monday - Friday on 0300 111 2340 or via help@localgiving.com and one of our team of qualified fundraisers will be happy to provide advice and support! 
    Jun 03, 2015 3146
  • 03 Jun 2015
    A group of 6 employees from De La Rue, Basingstoke are taking on the National Three Peak Challenge this weekend. Currently in the number 2 spot on the #LocalHero leaderboard, can they stay there until the 30th June to win some extra money for Basingstoke Young Carers? This isn't the first time employees from De La Rue have attempted the Three Peak Challenge. The company actively encourage it and allow team members to raise money for charities close to their hearts. Andrea Gibson from the team explains why they chose Basingstoke Young Carers to support. "As a group we were keen to support both a children’s charity and a local charity so we all agreed that this was the group that we wanted to support. For me personally, I undertook a care role for a parent throughout my teens at a time when support groups such as this weren’t in existence, so I am delighted to be supporting the work of this critical charity who offer such amazing support to the many young people who face such difficult circumstances in their day to day lives." Meet the team  I wondered why the group had chosen a Where's Wally theme for the event. They told me, "we considered a number of fancy dress options just for added interest, and thought that there might be some good photo opportunities for “Where’s Wally” and “Where’s Wenda” photos at various points along the route!" The Challenge In the National Three Peaks Challenge, the team will need to climb the three highest peaks in Scotland, England and Wales (plus the travel inbetween) within 24 hours. The peaks are: Snowdon, in Wales (1085m) Scafell Pike, in England (978m) Ben Nevis, in Scotland (1344m) "A couple of team members have done the event before and so know what they are letting themselves in for! However, for us newbies, we are not entirely sure what to expect. Apparently it is the minibus rides between the mountains that are the killers, the inevitable blisters and then the unpredictability of the weather (a couple of years ago the teams had to wade through 3 feet of water just to get back to the minibus having abandoned Scafell Pike)." Are they ready? The group have been preparing by running, walking and the occasional training session up 'Cardiac Hill' in Kingsclere. Trying to fit in training around a busy home life has resulted in some innovative techniques - speed marching with a weighted backpack and step-ups at bus stops. Every little helps! "Whatever preparation we make, I think it is still going to be a challenge, however I am assured that it is a fantastic experience and that walking up Scafell Pike in the moonlight is something not to be missed" --------------------------------------------------------  Top of the peaks!  Well done to the team who managed to reach the top of the three peaks successfully but sadly not under 24 hours due to traffic and a double tyre blowout! "Nonetheless it was an absolutely brilliant experience and memories for life. We encountered all kinds of weather (rain, lightening, horizontal hail and a lot of snow on Ben Nevis) but it was the relentless battering of the wind which made it the most tough." Now you can help Where's Wallys Waifs 3 Peaks Challenge win some extra money for Basingstoke Young Carers and keep them on the #LocalHero Leaderboard! Your donation will help them reach their £1,000 target, plus each new donor = another point in the competition!
    1698 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • A group of 6 employees from De La Rue, Basingstoke are taking on the National Three Peak Challenge this weekend. Currently in the number 2 spot on the #LocalHero leaderboard, can they stay there until the 30th June to win some extra money for Basingstoke Young Carers? This isn't the first time employees from De La Rue have attempted the Three Peak Challenge. The company actively encourage it and allow team members to raise money for charities close to their hearts. Andrea Gibson from the team explains why they chose Basingstoke Young Carers to support. "As a group we were keen to support both a children’s charity and a local charity so we all agreed that this was the group that we wanted to support. For me personally, I undertook a care role for a parent throughout my teens at a time when support groups such as this weren’t in existence, so I am delighted to be supporting the work of this critical charity who offer such amazing support to the many young people who face such difficult circumstances in their day to day lives." Meet the team  I wondered why the group had chosen a Where's Wally theme for the event. They told me, "we considered a number of fancy dress options just for added interest, and thought that there might be some good photo opportunities for “Where’s Wally” and “Where’s Wenda” photos at various points along the route!" The Challenge In the National Three Peaks Challenge, the team will need to climb the three highest peaks in Scotland, England and Wales (plus the travel inbetween) within 24 hours. The peaks are: Snowdon, in Wales (1085m) Scafell Pike, in England (978m) Ben Nevis, in Scotland (1344m) "A couple of team members have done the event before and so know what they are letting themselves in for! However, for us newbies, we are not entirely sure what to expect. Apparently it is the minibus rides between the mountains that are the killers, the inevitable blisters and then the unpredictability of the weather (a couple of years ago the teams had to wade through 3 feet of water just to get back to the minibus having abandoned Scafell Pike)." Are they ready? The group have been preparing by running, walking and the occasional training session up 'Cardiac Hill' in Kingsclere. Trying to fit in training around a busy home life has resulted in some innovative techniques - speed marching with a weighted backpack and step-ups at bus stops. Every little helps! "Whatever preparation we make, I think it is still going to be a challenge, however I am assured that it is a fantastic experience and that walking up Scafell Pike in the moonlight is something not to be missed" --------------------------------------------------------  Top of the peaks!  Well done to the team who managed to reach the top of the three peaks successfully but sadly not under 24 hours due to traffic and a double tyre blowout! "Nonetheless it was an absolutely brilliant experience and memories for life. We encountered all kinds of weather (rain, lightening, horizontal hail and a lot of snow on Ben Nevis) but it was the relentless battering of the wind which made it the most tough." Now you can help Where's Wallys Waifs 3 Peaks Challenge win some extra money for Basingstoke Young Carers and keep them on the #LocalHero Leaderboard! Your donation will help them reach their £1,000 target, plus each new donor = another point in the competition!
    Jun 03, 2015 1698