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270 blogs
  • 02 Jun 2015
    Today is World Environmental Day - a day for encouraging awareness and action for the enviroment. Sadly, people are consuming more resources than the planet can provide meaning before long we would need three planet Earth's to sustain the way we live. Even small changes in your community can have a large effect in reducing the threat of climate change on the World. Last year we spoke to community group Sustainable Hayfield, whose objective is to increase awareness of climate change issues in their local area. They kindly shared some everyday tips to help communities cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% before 2050, which is the UK government’s target. The tips are easily and cheaply executed in the home and also in an office – which will help you reduce your bills and your carbon footprint at the same time. Cath Moss, the groups manager explains, “We live in a lovely part of a fascinating planet, but we use too many resources. Change is inevitable, and the sooner we act the more choice we will have to shape our own future and lower the burden of change forced upon our children. Everybody can do their bit to help make a positive impact” 30% of our emissions result from heating and lighting in our homes Poorly insulated roofs and walls can account for 60% of heat loss in houses. Most households can get their lofts properly insulated for free by their energy provider. Fix radiator reflectors behind each radiator and add thermostatic valves – unobtrusive and cheap. Draughts account for 12% of all heat loss from dwellings. Draught excluders cost very little but are effective. Considering solar panels? A good source of advice is www.energysavingtrust.org.uk 40% of our emissions are generated by food production methods Avoid air-freighted products where possible. A tonne of Middle Eastern strawberries transported by air will account for 300 times more CO2 emissions than locally grown, seasonal strawberries, which also taste much better. Consider the balance in your diet between meat and non-meat foods. Animal foods are very energy intensive to produce, fruit and vegetables much less so. Reducing the proportion of meat/fish in your diet could reduce your food carbon footprint by up to 40%. Ensure you do not waste – or let your children waste – good food. Currently, over half the uneaten food disposed of by households is perfectly edible. Save waste/money by looking at 2 week menus, recipes, portion plans and more at Love Food Hate Waste (www.lovefoodhatewaste.com). Make your own lunch for work instead of buying over packaged food. Suggest introducing a ‘Bring your own lunch day’ to help get others involved. Growing your own fruit and vegetable reduces all the energy and waste which normally goes into commercially grown food Buy a couple of point-of-lay chickens (£4-£5 each). They need very little space, very low maintenance, and will happily feed on the food waste of an average family, supplemented by a bit of scatter corn. Do you have a garden shed which is not used very often? Cover up the window(s) and grow mushrooms where they won’t interfere with storage.   Want to learn more about what you can do to lower your carbon footprint? Visit Sustainable Hayfield’s Localgiving page.
    1548 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Today is World Environmental Day - a day for encouraging awareness and action for the enviroment. Sadly, people are consuming more resources than the planet can provide meaning before long we would need three planet Earth's to sustain the way we live. Even small changes in your community can have a large effect in reducing the threat of climate change on the World. Last year we spoke to community group Sustainable Hayfield, whose objective is to increase awareness of climate change issues in their local area. They kindly shared some everyday tips to help communities cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% before 2050, which is the UK government’s target. The tips are easily and cheaply executed in the home and also in an office – which will help you reduce your bills and your carbon footprint at the same time. Cath Moss, the groups manager explains, “We live in a lovely part of a fascinating planet, but we use too many resources. Change is inevitable, and the sooner we act the more choice we will have to shape our own future and lower the burden of change forced upon our children. Everybody can do their bit to help make a positive impact” 30% of our emissions result from heating and lighting in our homes Poorly insulated roofs and walls can account for 60% of heat loss in houses. Most households can get their lofts properly insulated for free by their energy provider. Fix radiator reflectors behind each radiator and add thermostatic valves – unobtrusive and cheap. Draughts account for 12% of all heat loss from dwellings. Draught excluders cost very little but are effective. Considering solar panels? A good source of advice is www.energysavingtrust.org.uk 40% of our emissions are generated by food production methods Avoid air-freighted products where possible. A tonne of Middle Eastern strawberries transported by air will account for 300 times more CO2 emissions than locally grown, seasonal strawberries, which also taste much better. Consider the balance in your diet between meat and non-meat foods. Animal foods are very energy intensive to produce, fruit and vegetables much less so. Reducing the proportion of meat/fish in your diet could reduce your food carbon footprint by up to 40%. Ensure you do not waste – or let your children waste – good food. Currently, over half the uneaten food disposed of by households is perfectly edible. Save waste/money by looking at 2 week menus, recipes, portion plans and more at Love Food Hate Waste (www.lovefoodhatewaste.com). Make your own lunch for work instead of buying over packaged food. Suggest introducing a ‘Bring your own lunch day’ to help get others involved. Growing your own fruit and vegetable reduces all the energy and waste which normally goes into commercially grown food Buy a couple of point-of-lay chickens (£4-£5 each). They need very little space, very low maintenance, and will happily feed on the food waste of an average family, supplemented by a bit of scatter corn. Do you have a garden shed which is not used very often? Cover up the window(s) and grow mushrooms where they won’t interfere with storage.   Want to learn more about what you can do to lower your carbon footprint? Visit Sustainable Hayfield’s Localgiving page.
    Jun 02, 2015 1548
  • 29 Apr 2014
    This month our 'Cause of the Month' has been climate change and we’ve asked our environmental groups how they reduce their carbon footprint and raise environmental awareness. More Trees for BANES have shared with us their Tree Adoption Agency which is a great scheme to encourage planting thousands of trees across Bath and North East Somerset. Their work is funded by public donations and small grants and they rely solely on the generosity of their volunteers. The idea for the project came to Adam, a member of the group when he was home gardening. “I kept finding hazel saplings popping up in inappropriate places - no doubt left there by a squirrel that either has a memory issue, or perhaps has met it’s maker. I popped them all in pots, knowing that I’d be able to find them a home through More Trees BANES.” Adam soon realised that this would have been happening in gardens across the region, so began encouraging others to do the same. People can collect any unwanted saplings in pots, and drop them in Adam’s front garden or have the volunteers come and dig them up. Amidst increased awareness of climate change and how to tackle it, this project proves vital as trees absorb carbon dioxide and contribute to the slowing down of this process. Deforestation has contributed greatly to climate change in the releasing of CO2. Would you like to help their cause? The group are looking for mainly native varieties or trees and Beech; unfortunately, they cannot currently accept Ash or Sycamore. So if you live in BANES and have unwanted saplings, or would be interested in giving one a home, please get in touch with the group. They are currently raising money to set up a modest tree nursery to grow more trees from seeds. Visit their Localgiving page here to read more about what they do and how to get in touch.
    1043 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • This month our 'Cause of the Month' has been climate change and we’ve asked our environmental groups how they reduce their carbon footprint and raise environmental awareness. More Trees for BANES have shared with us their Tree Adoption Agency which is a great scheme to encourage planting thousands of trees across Bath and North East Somerset. Their work is funded by public donations and small grants and they rely solely on the generosity of their volunteers. The idea for the project came to Adam, a member of the group when he was home gardening. “I kept finding hazel saplings popping up in inappropriate places - no doubt left there by a squirrel that either has a memory issue, or perhaps has met it’s maker. I popped them all in pots, knowing that I’d be able to find them a home through More Trees BANES.” Adam soon realised that this would have been happening in gardens across the region, so began encouraging others to do the same. People can collect any unwanted saplings in pots, and drop them in Adam’s front garden or have the volunteers come and dig them up. Amidst increased awareness of climate change and how to tackle it, this project proves vital as trees absorb carbon dioxide and contribute to the slowing down of this process. Deforestation has contributed greatly to climate change in the releasing of CO2. Would you like to help their cause? The group are looking for mainly native varieties or trees and Beech; unfortunately, they cannot currently accept Ash or Sycamore. So if you live in BANES and have unwanted saplings, or would be interested in giving one a home, please get in touch with the group. They are currently raising money to set up a modest tree nursery to grow more trees from seeds. Visit their Localgiving page here to read more about what they do and how to get in touch.
    Apr 29, 2014 1043
  • 29 Apr 2014
    Roaming Penzance is a community-led group in Penzance, a safe social space where anyone who finds themselves homeless, or disadvantaged in some way, is regarded as equal and able to be themselves. Laura Wild, Roaming CIC Director and facilitator of the group, talks about Roaming’s creative activities that provide a focus for people in rebuilding their confidence and self-esteem. “In our Thursday group we create a regular space where people are able to relax and share art activities as well as baking bread, cooking and eating a healthy meal together. Some people find us by word of mouth, most are referred by St. Petroc’s Society in whose premises we meet. St.Petroc’s provide Outreach and Resettlement Services throughout Cornwall. We have lively discussions as a group over lunch about life, art and our environment and how best to value these things. We plan together which art processes, writing or cooking we wish to share together. Occasional field trips allow us to explore and experiment more widely and visiting artists give us new perspectives on art as well as culture in general. Twice a year we hold exhibitions of our work so the wider Penzance community can see and talk with us about what we do. We have found this helps to narrow gaps in understanding between people with different lifestyles. Penzance is one of the most deprived parishes in England and recently local support services were cut. The activities that we provide would be otherwise unaffordable to our members. We hope that the “Charity begins in Cornwall” Match fund from Localgiving will help us to raise more awareness for our group and crucial funds to be able to continue. We are passionate about the difference we are able to make for the community and happy with the great feedback we’ve received.” Read messages from members and supporters of Roaming Penzance: “I am very grateful for the warm reception I received every Thursday within the group at Roaming Penzance. The stress, and I must say hardship, I experienced whilst homeless was regularly broken up, giving me a days respite on those Thursdays. Laura would, and still does if the need arises, greet me with a cup of coffee or tea from her limited resources - then I would spent few hours spent in a very relaxed atmosphere painting or water coloring or simply reading a magazine.” Former member of Roaming CIC “Roaming cuts across all kinds of old, inhibiting categories—especially what is and isn’t “art”,what is and isn’t “research,” what is and isn’t “good” or “true” or “valuable.”We all want to learn something new, about ourselves, one another, and the conditions we share.” Nancy Roth – Director of Roaming CIC “The ‘Roaming’ Art Group has been a great success thus far, as evidenced by the recent exhibition. Artwork produced by those attending the group has been displayed at Breadline. I spoke to some of the artists who were present at their exhibition, and it was clear to me that this exhibition was quite a big event in their lives, which had given them a sense of achievement and self-worth. It was touching.” Dr Heidi Burke, Cornwall Health for Homeless “Roaming Penzance gives people the chance to begin to build some structure into their lives. They have the chance to try things, discover new skills, be part of a group where they feel welcomed, included, and valued for their talents not their label. These things are positive and very important when people are faced with uncertainty and lacking confidence as they begin to move on in their lives.” Debbie Croucher, Development Coordinator, Transformation Cornwall “I am so much in favour of these sorts of things that attempt to address the root causes rather than merely providing a pill to try and do something to reduce the effects; it’s much more time consuming but so much better for all concerned, so I do congratulate and thank you all for what you are doing.” Colonel ET Bolitho OBE, Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall To find out more about Roaming CIC and to support them, visit their website on Localgiving. Read more about the ‘Charity begins in Cornwall’ match fund here.
    1376 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Roaming Penzance is a community-led group in Penzance, a safe social space where anyone who finds themselves homeless, or disadvantaged in some way, is regarded as equal and able to be themselves. Laura Wild, Roaming CIC Director and facilitator of the group, talks about Roaming’s creative activities that provide a focus for people in rebuilding their confidence and self-esteem. “In our Thursday group we create a regular space where people are able to relax and share art activities as well as baking bread, cooking and eating a healthy meal together. Some people find us by word of mouth, most are referred by St. Petroc’s Society in whose premises we meet. St.Petroc’s provide Outreach and Resettlement Services throughout Cornwall. We have lively discussions as a group over lunch about life, art and our environment and how best to value these things. We plan together which art processes, writing or cooking we wish to share together. Occasional field trips allow us to explore and experiment more widely and visiting artists give us new perspectives on art as well as culture in general. Twice a year we hold exhibitions of our work so the wider Penzance community can see and talk with us about what we do. We have found this helps to narrow gaps in understanding between people with different lifestyles. Penzance is one of the most deprived parishes in England and recently local support services were cut. The activities that we provide would be otherwise unaffordable to our members. We hope that the “Charity begins in Cornwall” Match fund from Localgiving will help us to raise more awareness for our group and crucial funds to be able to continue. We are passionate about the difference we are able to make for the community and happy with the great feedback we’ve received.” Read messages from members and supporters of Roaming Penzance: “I am very grateful for the warm reception I received every Thursday within the group at Roaming Penzance. The stress, and I must say hardship, I experienced whilst homeless was regularly broken up, giving me a days respite on those Thursdays. Laura would, and still does if the need arises, greet me with a cup of coffee or tea from her limited resources - then I would spent few hours spent in a very relaxed atmosphere painting or water coloring or simply reading a magazine.” Former member of Roaming CIC “Roaming cuts across all kinds of old, inhibiting categories—especially what is and isn’t “art”,what is and isn’t “research,” what is and isn’t “good” or “true” or “valuable.”We all want to learn something new, about ourselves, one another, and the conditions we share.” Nancy Roth – Director of Roaming CIC “The ‘Roaming’ Art Group has been a great success thus far, as evidenced by the recent exhibition. Artwork produced by those attending the group has been displayed at Breadline. I spoke to some of the artists who were present at their exhibition, and it was clear to me that this exhibition was quite a big event in their lives, which had given them a sense of achievement and self-worth. It was touching.” Dr Heidi Burke, Cornwall Health for Homeless “Roaming Penzance gives people the chance to begin to build some structure into their lives. They have the chance to try things, discover new skills, be part of a group where they feel welcomed, included, and valued for their talents not their label. These things are positive and very important when people are faced with uncertainty and lacking confidence as they begin to move on in their lives.” Debbie Croucher, Development Coordinator, Transformation Cornwall “I am so much in favour of these sorts of things that attempt to address the root causes rather than merely providing a pill to try and do something to reduce the effects; it’s much more time consuming but so much better for all concerned, so I do congratulate and thank you all for what you are doing.” Colonel ET Bolitho OBE, Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall To find out more about Roaming CIC and to support them, visit their website on Localgiving. Read more about the ‘Charity begins in Cornwall’ match fund here.
    Apr 29, 2014 1376
  • 02 May 2014
    This month we’re celebrating being active because it’s May and it’s time to enjoy the outdoors. After the long, cold, wet winter we can finally be outside; walking, jogging, playing and using up the energy we’ve built up in the last 6 months. That’s why our cause this month is Fitness. We’ll be highlighting the many benefits of exercise, especially walking. May is National Walking Month which includes Walk to Work Week (12th – 16th) and Walk to School Week (19th – 23rd). Walking is an underrated form of exercise but it’s ideal for people of all ages and all levels of fitness. What’s more, it’s easy and it’s free. The benefits of being active are not only physical but mental and emotional as well. Daily or weekly exercise will give you more energy in the day and help you sleep better at night, which will improve your mood. Regular psychical activity also greatly decreases health risks such as heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes and depression. On Localgiving, there are many organisations trying to get their communities off their sofas and on to their feet. This month, why don’t you try and find a sports club or activity based group near you and see the benefits for yourself?
    900 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • This month we’re celebrating being active because it’s May and it’s time to enjoy the outdoors. After the long, cold, wet winter we can finally be outside; walking, jogging, playing and using up the energy we’ve built up in the last 6 months. That’s why our cause this month is Fitness. We’ll be highlighting the many benefits of exercise, especially walking. May is National Walking Month which includes Walk to Work Week (12th – 16th) and Walk to School Week (19th – 23rd). Walking is an underrated form of exercise but it’s ideal for people of all ages and all levels of fitness. What’s more, it’s easy and it’s free. The benefits of being active are not only physical but mental and emotional as well. Daily or weekly exercise will give you more energy in the day and help you sleep better at night, which will improve your mood. Regular psychical activity also greatly decreases health risks such as heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes and depression. On Localgiving, there are many organisations trying to get their communities off their sofas and on to their feet. This month, why don’t you try and find a sports club or activity based group near you and see the benefits for yourself?
    May 02, 2014 900
  • 09 May 2014
    Over the past three decades Saint Petroc’s Society, a Cornish charity founded by the Bishop of St Germans in 1986, has helped thousands of homeless people, all with their own individual stories and challenges. Corinna Langford, Community Relations Manager, explains why the work of the organisation is so important to this county that has the second highest number of rough sleepers in the UK. And how the donations raised through Localgiving’s recent Match fund will help them to continue supporting people in very difficult times. “Our charity works with some of the most vulnerable and socially excluded individuals in our society and as such makes an enormous difference to those people. Homelessness can happen to anyone and during these recent austere times, we have seen a large number of people who have lost their jobs and then their homes as a result. Homeless people are career professionals, armed forces personnel, young people, people suffering relationship breakdowns, fleeing violence, people suffering mental ill-health – all of them are real people with aspirations! A while ago we helped a 38 year old man who had spent a significant part of his childhood in care and had had a less than pleasant experience. He spent his latter teen years and on into adult hood searching for somewhere secure to call home. When St Petroc’s found him, he was living in a tent and suffering with the flu. We took him in, gave him a warm bed and a roof over his head. Most importantly, he was given security and stability, something he had never experienced. He was supported with issues such as mental ill-health and a drug addiction that had started as his way of coping with life and his traumatic childhood experiences that haunted him. With the right support he eventually moved into his own accommodation, found work and has continued to inspire others. There is nothing better than being able to make a positive difference in your community But like most charities, St Petroc’s has faced austere times and threats to funding which has been particularly challenging given the ever increasing number of homeless people in need of help. Without our organisation there would be no outreach service to find and support those sleeping rough, 45 bedspaces would vanish along with hundreds of collective years professional experience of the staff team who are absolutely amazing and extremely talented.”  If you want to find out more about Saint Petroc’s Society,or support them with a donation, visit their webpage on Localgiving.
    929 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Over the past three decades Saint Petroc’s Society, a Cornish charity founded by the Bishop of St Germans in 1986, has helped thousands of homeless people, all with their own individual stories and challenges. Corinna Langford, Community Relations Manager, explains why the work of the organisation is so important to this county that has the second highest number of rough sleepers in the UK. And how the donations raised through Localgiving’s recent Match fund will help them to continue supporting people in very difficult times. “Our charity works with some of the most vulnerable and socially excluded individuals in our society and as such makes an enormous difference to those people. Homelessness can happen to anyone and during these recent austere times, we have seen a large number of people who have lost their jobs and then their homes as a result. Homeless people are career professionals, armed forces personnel, young people, people suffering relationship breakdowns, fleeing violence, people suffering mental ill-health – all of them are real people with aspirations! A while ago we helped a 38 year old man who had spent a significant part of his childhood in care and had had a less than pleasant experience. He spent his latter teen years and on into adult hood searching for somewhere secure to call home. When St Petroc’s found him, he was living in a tent and suffering with the flu. We took him in, gave him a warm bed and a roof over his head. Most importantly, he was given security and stability, something he had never experienced. He was supported with issues such as mental ill-health and a drug addiction that had started as his way of coping with life and his traumatic childhood experiences that haunted him. With the right support he eventually moved into his own accommodation, found work and has continued to inspire others. There is nothing better than being able to make a positive difference in your community But like most charities, St Petroc’s has faced austere times and threats to funding which has been particularly challenging given the ever increasing number of homeless people in need of help. Without our organisation there would be no outreach service to find and support those sleeping rough, 45 bedspaces would vanish along with hundreds of collective years professional experience of the staff team who are absolutely amazing and extremely talented.”  If you want to find out more about Saint Petroc’s Society,or support them with a donation, visit their webpage on Localgiving.
    May 09, 2014 929
  • 13 May 2014
    Since 1999, Lizard C.H.I.L.D Trust has aimed to provide Community Help Improving Learning and Development (C.H.I.L.D) for children up to 12 years old. The organisation has grown in popularity each year, currently involving 134 children who are able to join regular sessions teaching them from an early age the importance of a healthy lifestyle. Sports4Tots needs funds Sport4Tots, their most successful project, desperately needs funding to continue running, funds that the group are hoping to raise during Localgiving’s Charity Begins in Cornwall campaign. “Unfortunately the Trust cannot sustain this much-needed and loved-project alone. We get some donations from parents however as we live in an area of high unemployment and poverty, we are struggling to meet our target”, explains Jody Finbow, volunteer fundraiser at the Lizard C.H.I.L.D Trust. “If we don’t receive enough funds, we need to stop the project, which will see both the Trust and it’s beneficiaries lose out on an essential and integral service provision. The match fund campaign will make a massive difference to those who want to donate but aren’t able to give as much as they would like. Sports4tots is a 30 week programme over three terms that introduces children under 5 years to exercise through sport and play. These sessions teach children from an early age the importance of a healthy lifestyle as well as teamwork and help them to build their confidence and social skills to prepare them for the next stage of their learning journey. In some cases we have used the Sports4tots session specifically to work with children who have challenging behaviour. This has resulted in making a huge difference to the children’s progress, allowing them to build friendships and carry out tasks easier than before. This is something that may come easier to others but this is an enormous development to them. What we are in need of now are donations to keep this project alive for our community, giving our children the chance of a healthier and happy start in life.”
    957 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Since 1999, Lizard C.H.I.L.D Trust has aimed to provide Community Help Improving Learning and Development (C.H.I.L.D) for children up to 12 years old. The organisation has grown in popularity each year, currently involving 134 children who are able to join regular sessions teaching them from an early age the importance of a healthy lifestyle. Sports4Tots needs funds Sport4Tots, their most successful project, desperately needs funding to continue running, funds that the group are hoping to raise during Localgiving’s Charity Begins in Cornwall campaign. “Unfortunately the Trust cannot sustain this much-needed and loved-project alone. We get some donations from parents however as we live in an area of high unemployment and poverty, we are struggling to meet our target”, explains Jody Finbow, volunteer fundraiser at the Lizard C.H.I.L.D Trust. “If we don’t receive enough funds, we need to stop the project, which will see both the Trust and it’s beneficiaries lose out on an essential and integral service provision. The match fund campaign will make a massive difference to those who want to donate but aren’t able to give as much as they would like. Sports4tots is a 30 week programme over three terms that introduces children under 5 years to exercise through sport and play. These sessions teach children from an early age the importance of a healthy lifestyle as well as teamwork and help them to build their confidence and social skills to prepare them for the next stage of their learning journey. In some cases we have used the Sports4tots session specifically to work with children who have challenging behaviour. This has resulted in making a huge difference to the children’s progress, allowing them to build friendships and carry out tasks easier than before. This is something that may come easier to others but this is an enormous development to them. What we are in need of now are donations to keep this project alive for our community, giving our children the chance of a healthier and happy start in life.”
    May 13, 2014 957
  • 26 May 2015
    To introduce the campaign we've got a very special video from Lord David Puttnam, who produced world famous films such as Chariots of Fire, Midnight Express and The Killing Fields. He also produced a wonderful film called Local Hero in 1983, which matches the name of our campaign. So, we asked whether he'd be willing to say a few words about it and we're thrilled to say he accepted! Watch the short video below to hear his introduction to the contest. How does #LocalHero work? This June, we're giving away £5,000 worth of prizes to the top 20 fundraisers. Participants will be ranked according to the number of unique online donors from whom they secure sponsorship throughout the month. To help you find a #LocalHero we've put together some handy resources such as an email template, social media banners and a PR template. Find them here. If you are struggling for inspiration then check out these examples of fantastic fundraisers to get those ideas flowing:      Do you want to be a #LocalHero? Sign up here!  
    2028 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • To introduce the campaign we've got a very special video from Lord David Puttnam, who produced world famous films such as Chariots of Fire, Midnight Express and The Killing Fields. He also produced a wonderful film called Local Hero in 1983, which matches the name of our campaign. So, we asked whether he'd be willing to say a few words about it and we're thrilled to say he accepted! Watch the short video below to hear his introduction to the contest. How does #LocalHero work? This June, we're giving away £5,000 worth of prizes to the top 20 fundraisers. Participants will be ranked according to the number of unique online donors from whom they secure sponsorship throughout the month. To help you find a #LocalHero we've put together some handy resources such as an email template, social media banners and a PR template. Find them here. If you are struggling for inspiration then check out these examples of fantastic fundraisers to get those ideas flowing:      Do you want to be a #LocalHero? Sign up here!  
    May 26, 2015 2028
  • 22 May 2015
    Melanie Jeffs knows first-hand how important Nottingham Women's Centre services are for women seeking a safe and supportive environment.  "As the Centre Manager, I see the impact that we make every day. Our strapline is 'Helping women achieve amazing things' and I truly believe that we do this - and I decided to do some amazing stuff myself to demonstrate it." Providing this support costs money but it really does change lives Nottingham’s Women Centre has been running for 41 years and offers services from child care to counselling, basic skills and person wellbeing courses to help women achieve their aims in life. However, providing this support comes at a price which is why fundraising is so important to keeping the charity running. “It’s an experience I’ll never forget” The adventure pushed Mel to her limits to support the centre’s services which she believes can change lives. In August, she trained for only 8 weeks before stepping into a boxing ring. She then faced her fear of heights by abseiling down a 80ft high bridge in October and to top it all off, in November she jumped out of a plane!  Mel raised a whopping £2,147.23 for the centre after her stunts, which exceeded her £2,000 target.  "The money has gone towards turning a store room into an additional office for our mental health project ‘Renew’ (previously we had 21 different staff and volunteers juggling two desks and computers!!!) and also a small hardship fund to enable women to access childcare and/or counselling either free of charge or at reduced rates." Click to see brave Mel's fundraising page - 'My Year of Adventure for Nottingham Women's Centre'
    1474 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Melanie Jeffs knows first-hand how important Nottingham Women's Centre services are for women seeking a safe and supportive environment.  "As the Centre Manager, I see the impact that we make every day. Our strapline is 'Helping women achieve amazing things' and I truly believe that we do this - and I decided to do some amazing stuff myself to demonstrate it." Providing this support costs money but it really does change lives Nottingham’s Women Centre has been running for 41 years and offers services from child care to counselling, basic skills and person wellbeing courses to help women achieve their aims in life. However, providing this support comes at a price which is why fundraising is so important to keeping the charity running. “It’s an experience I’ll never forget” The adventure pushed Mel to her limits to support the centre’s services which she believes can change lives. In August, she trained for only 8 weeks before stepping into a boxing ring. She then faced her fear of heights by abseiling down a 80ft high bridge in October and to top it all off, in November she jumped out of a plane!  Mel raised a whopping £2,147.23 for the centre after her stunts, which exceeded her £2,000 target.  "The money has gone towards turning a store room into an additional office for our mental health project ‘Renew’ (previously we had 21 different staff and volunteers juggling two desks and computers!!!) and also a small hardship fund to enable women to access childcare and/or counselling either free of charge or at reduced rates." Click to see brave Mel's fundraising page - 'My Year of Adventure for Nottingham Women's Centre'
    May 22, 2015 1474
  • 22 May 2015
     "...and who are you riding for?" When Tony, an experienced long distance cyclist decided to cross the pond and ride through the mighty USA, all his friends where asking him "...and who are you riding for?". Having previously only thought of his trips as holidays, he thought this was a good opportunity to fundraise for charity. "This time I knew with an expedition across a continent that I would be out of my comfort zone. With so many miles, deprivation and effort it seemed a good enough reason to tempt my friends to part with some cash." "I felt strongly that the folk who often have to sacrifice their lives to caring are truly heroes" Acknowledging his luck in being healthy and comfortable in life with few caring responsibilities for older relatives, he was attracted to York Carers Centre. The charity support people who subordinate their own time, money and ambitions to look after their loved ones. A proud Yorkie, he was also encouraged by the fact it was a local charity and that any money raised would stay in York and his community would benefit.  "I contacted the charity and was invited to meet some of the staff. I became even more enthused after talking to to the magnificent Sharron Smith and we then talked how we might plan and promote my ride to maximise any money raised." "It was a fabulously long ride, it had deserts, mountain ranges, forests, prairies and rivers as sights to see." Cycling accross America was always on his "bucket list", intrigued by the parts of America that you don't normally get to see. He experienced; bible belt churches, endless pick up trucks and farmers, the small town America of hamlets, Kentucky coal mines, vineyards, fruit orchards, Amish buggies, British ramblers visiting National Parks, irate blue collar Harley Davidson riders giving the finger, packs of dogs and every different version of a cheese burger!  "It was the time of my life and I found the different America I was searching for. I rode 3,900 miles at 73 miles a day. I felt that my relationship with the charity was quite close as I knew many of the staff. I also felt that climbing off was never an option as I had to ‘deliver’ the dosh! They invited me to a staff meeting after the ride and personally thanked me for my efforts - I was very grateful." York Carers Centre told Tony that £1000 would be tremendous. Well, Tony raised double that amount, a fantastic £2,078.05! Well done Tony for making it across America in one piece and of course for raising such a huge amount. A note from York Carers Centre "At times when it has become increasingly difficult to raise funds for charitable work and when there are huge demands on public services and finance York Carers Centre were thrilled that Tony Ives chose to raise funds to help our organisation. We were further surprised and delighted by the substantial sum Tony raised and this will be used to directly support carers with responsibilities for those suffering from substance and alcohol misuse and mental health problems.We are very grateful to Tony who set himself the daunting task of cycling across the USA and extremely proud of his own personal achievement in helping us."  Find out more about Tony's incredible journey on his blog or take a look at his very successful fundraising page 'Follow Your Arrow USA 2014'        
    1471 Posted by Steph Heyden
  •  "...and who are you riding for?" When Tony, an experienced long distance cyclist decided to cross the pond and ride through the mighty USA, all his friends where asking him "...and who are you riding for?". Having previously only thought of his trips as holidays, he thought this was a good opportunity to fundraise for charity. "This time I knew with an expedition across a continent that I would be out of my comfort zone. With so many miles, deprivation and effort it seemed a good enough reason to tempt my friends to part with some cash." "I felt strongly that the folk who often have to sacrifice their lives to caring are truly heroes" Acknowledging his luck in being healthy and comfortable in life with few caring responsibilities for older relatives, he was attracted to York Carers Centre. The charity support people who subordinate their own time, money and ambitions to look after their loved ones. A proud Yorkie, he was also encouraged by the fact it was a local charity and that any money raised would stay in York and his community would benefit.  "I contacted the charity and was invited to meet some of the staff. I became even more enthused after talking to to the magnificent Sharron Smith and we then talked how we might plan and promote my ride to maximise any money raised." "It was a fabulously long ride, it had deserts, mountain ranges, forests, prairies and rivers as sights to see." Cycling accross America was always on his "bucket list", intrigued by the parts of America that you don't normally get to see. He experienced; bible belt churches, endless pick up trucks and farmers, the small town America of hamlets, Kentucky coal mines, vineyards, fruit orchards, Amish buggies, British ramblers visiting National Parks, irate blue collar Harley Davidson riders giving the finger, packs of dogs and every different version of a cheese burger!  "It was the time of my life and I found the different America I was searching for. I rode 3,900 miles at 73 miles a day. I felt that my relationship with the charity was quite close as I knew many of the staff. I also felt that climbing off was never an option as I had to ‘deliver’ the dosh! They invited me to a staff meeting after the ride and personally thanked me for my efforts - I was very grateful." York Carers Centre told Tony that £1000 would be tremendous. Well, Tony raised double that amount, a fantastic £2,078.05! Well done Tony for making it across America in one piece and of course for raising such a huge amount. A note from York Carers Centre "At times when it has become increasingly difficult to raise funds for charitable work and when there are huge demands on public services and finance York Carers Centre were thrilled that Tony Ives chose to raise funds to help our organisation. We were further surprised and delighted by the substantial sum Tony raised and this will be used to directly support carers with responsibilities for those suffering from substance and alcohol misuse and mental health problems.We are very grateful to Tony who set himself the daunting task of cycling across the USA and extremely proud of his own personal achievement in helping us."  Find out more about Tony's incredible journey on his blog or take a look at his very successful fundraising page 'Follow Your Arrow USA 2014'        
    May 22, 2015 1471
  • 18 May 2015
    Each year on Shrove Tuesday, the little town of Olney in Buckinghamshire is invaded by women and their frying pans for the world famous Olney Pancake Race. This year Julie, who now lives in Olney, decided she wanted to take part in this old tradition while raising money for FACES who provide practical and emotional help to families. "I wanted to raise money for a local charity that would benefit children and families and I decided FACES would be ideal. I am a paediatric nurse and the work that FACES does would very much benefit many of the people I come across." The tradition dates back to 1445 when a local woman who was making pancakes preparing from Shrove Tuesday, heard the "Shriving bell" signalling the start of the church service. Frying pan still in hand, she ran to the church, skillfully tossing the pancake to prevent it from burning while still dressed in her apron and headscarf - wonderfully modelled by Julie on the right.  "I was amazed by the response and support I received. I set out to try to raise £100 so to raise more than £700 (including offline donations) was fantastic!" And the money raised... Wendie from FACES (Family and Children's Early-help Services) explains, "we were delighted when Julie approached us and said she would like to raise funds for FACES. We are a local independent charity and all the money that is raised goes directly to families and their children when times are tough for them. Julie did an amazing job and raised a staggering £700 for us and although the money is fantastic, an added bonus was that she helped us to raise our profile. The money Julie raised has been put aside to pay for a daytrip for our most deprived children, many of them have nothing to look forward to in the Summer holidays. Paying through Localgiving was such an easy way for Julie and FACES to promote the event on our social media sites, it was easy to post a link and take donors straight to our page. Julie is our hero and we are so very grateful to her." Visit Julie's page - 'Julie's running the Olney Pancake Race for FACEs!' 
    1372 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Each year on Shrove Tuesday, the little town of Olney in Buckinghamshire is invaded by women and their frying pans for the world famous Olney Pancake Race. This year Julie, who now lives in Olney, decided she wanted to take part in this old tradition while raising money for FACES who provide practical and emotional help to families. "I wanted to raise money for a local charity that would benefit children and families and I decided FACES would be ideal. I am a paediatric nurse and the work that FACES does would very much benefit many of the people I come across." The tradition dates back to 1445 when a local woman who was making pancakes preparing from Shrove Tuesday, heard the "Shriving bell" signalling the start of the church service. Frying pan still in hand, she ran to the church, skillfully tossing the pancake to prevent it from burning while still dressed in her apron and headscarf - wonderfully modelled by Julie on the right.  "I was amazed by the response and support I received. I set out to try to raise £100 so to raise more than £700 (including offline donations) was fantastic!" And the money raised... Wendie from FACES (Family and Children's Early-help Services) explains, "we were delighted when Julie approached us and said she would like to raise funds for FACES. We are a local independent charity and all the money that is raised goes directly to families and their children when times are tough for them. Julie did an amazing job and raised a staggering £700 for us and although the money is fantastic, an added bonus was that she helped us to raise our profile. The money Julie raised has been put aside to pay for a daytrip for our most deprived children, many of them have nothing to look forward to in the Summer holidays. Paying through Localgiving was such an easy way for Julie and FACES to promote the event on our social media sites, it was easy to post a link and take donors straight to our page. Julie is our hero and we are so very grateful to her." Visit Julie's page - 'Julie's running the Olney Pancake Race for FACEs!' 
    May 18, 2015 1372