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275 blogs
  • 03 Aug 2017
    Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    2305 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    Aug 03, 2017 2305
  • 24 Jul 2017
    On Thursday 20th July, Marcelle Speller, the founder and chair of the Localgiving Foundation, stepped down after 9 years’ service. We are grateful to Marcelle for her incredible vision in setting up Localgiving, the only fundraising platform dedicated to supporting local charities and community groups in the UK, and for her unceasing passion for the local charity sector. The Foundation has appointed Tom Latchford as the new chair. Tom has helped raise tens of millions of pounds for charities online as founder of Raising IT, which is the UK market leader for websites and fundraising tools for the third sector. He will be bringing his experience, passion and philanthropic pedigree to help more local charities grow. We are excited about this new chapter. We will continue to provide our services and programmes including match fund campaigns, regional development programmes and advocacy work. Looking forward, Localgiving and Raising IT will work closely together to create new, high quality products and services for our members. Should you have any questions please get in touch with the Localgiving help desk who will be glad to help.    
  • On Thursday 20th July, Marcelle Speller, the founder and chair of the Localgiving Foundation, stepped down after 9 years’ service. We are grateful to Marcelle for her incredible vision in setting up Localgiving, the only fundraising platform dedicated to supporting local charities and community groups in the UK, and for her unceasing passion for the local charity sector. The Foundation has appointed Tom Latchford as the new chair. Tom has helped raise tens of millions of pounds for charities online as founder of Raising IT, which is the UK market leader for websites and fundraising tools for the third sector. He will be bringing his experience, passion and philanthropic pedigree to help more local charities grow. We are excited about this new chapter. We will continue to provide our services and programmes including match fund campaigns, regional development programmes and advocacy work. Looking forward, Localgiving and Raising IT will work closely together to create new, high quality products and services for our members. Should you have any questions please get in touch with the Localgiving help desk who will be glad to help.    
    Jul 24, 2017 2179
  • 20 Jul 2017
    I’m Beth House and I’m the Creative Producer at Taking Flight Theatre Company. We are a small charity aiming to challenge perceptions of disability through making quality touring theatre that showcases talented, professional disabled, D/deaf, sensory impaired and non-disabled performers working together. Taking Flight Theatre does not get core funding. There is some business development support from The Arts Council of Wales, plus project funding from them too. In addition to this, we get lots of small grants from a wide variety of sources… and then we fundraise like crazy. It's really hard to fundraise to cover our planning time. We have loads of brilliant projects coming up next year. These include an England tour of You’ve Got Dragons, our show for young children based on the picture book by Kathryn Cave which gently raises the issue of mental health in very young people, and of course our annual accessible Shakespeare tour of Wales. But we need time to plan and manage all these projects starting now. Lots of people give to Taking Flight- money, time, support, smiles- I wanted to give something too. So I decided to do something drastic. I love my hair so I thought- why not shave it off? But not all of it (let’s face it- that’s been done) so just half of it. And dye the rest. Whatever colour the sponsors want me to dye it. I made a fundraising page to this end on my own personal Locagiving account: SHAVEBETH’SHAIR . However, when I started to publicise the campaign, I got lots of cross messages from friends and family who point blank refused to fund me shaving off the locks THEY had grown so attached to (Huh!). So, I set up a second page: SAVEBETH’SHAIR. I have set my two fundraising pages in competition with each other. The page that has the greatest total at 10am on July 30th wins and I will save or shave my hair accordingly. If it’s SHAVE, I will also dye my remaining hair the colour voted for by the most SHAVE supporters. The combined total must be at least £1k for me to shave. To shave or not to shave! I’m really hoping to raise at least £1000 towards the work of Taking Flight. All the money raised will go into the making Taking Flight function over the busy months of planning next year’s shows.  If you want to see the work of Taking Flight before you decide if you want to support them, they are currently on tour with their take on The Tempest until July 30th. Remaining dates are in West Wales, South Wales and The Forest of Dean  www.takingflighttheatre.co.uk for details. Taking Flight are currently also recruiting volunteers and board members.   Show images: Jorge Lizalde Cano headshot: Claire Cousin Found this blog post useful? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story?  
    1078 Posted by Beth House
  • I’m Beth House and I’m the Creative Producer at Taking Flight Theatre Company. We are a small charity aiming to challenge perceptions of disability through making quality touring theatre that showcases talented, professional disabled, D/deaf, sensory impaired and non-disabled performers working together. Taking Flight Theatre does not get core funding. There is some business development support from The Arts Council of Wales, plus project funding from them too. In addition to this, we get lots of small grants from a wide variety of sources… and then we fundraise like crazy. It's really hard to fundraise to cover our planning time. We have loads of brilliant projects coming up next year. These include an England tour of You’ve Got Dragons, our show for young children based on the picture book by Kathryn Cave which gently raises the issue of mental health in very young people, and of course our annual accessible Shakespeare tour of Wales. But we need time to plan and manage all these projects starting now. Lots of people give to Taking Flight- money, time, support, smiles- I wanted to give something too. So I decided to do something drastic. I love my hair so I thought- why not shave it off? But not all of it (let’s face it- that’s been done) so just half of it. And dye the rest. Whatever colour the sponsors want me to dye it. I made a fundraising page to this end on my own personal Locagiving account: SHAVEBETH’SHAIR . However, when I started to publicise the campaign, I got lots of cross messages from friends and family who point blank refused to fund me shaving off the locks THEY had grown so attached to (Huh!). So, I set up a second page: SAVEBETH’SHAIR. I have set my two fundraising pages in competition with each other. The page that has the greatest total at 10am on July 30th wins and I will save or shave my hair accordingly. If it’s SHAVE, I will also dye my remaining hair the colour voted for by the most SHAVE supporters. The combined total must be at least £1k for me to shave. To shave or not to shave! I’m really hoping to raise at least £1000 towards the work of Taking Flight. All the money raised will go into the making Taking Flight function over the busy months of planning next year’s shows.  If you want to see the work of Taking Flight before you decide if you want to support them, they are currently on tour with their take on The Tempest until July 30th. Remaining dates are in West Wales, South Wales and The Forest of Dean  www.takingflighttheatre.co.uk for details. Taking Flight are currently also recruiting volunteers and board members.   Show images: Jorge Lizalde Cano headshot: Claire Cousin Found this blog post useful? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story?  
    Jul 20, 2017 1078
  • 13 Jul 2017
    Less than three years ago the Wild Cat Wilderness in Catford was an overgrown, unloved, rubbish strewn site. Today it is a thriving community green space run by the Rushey Green Time Bank. The Wild Cat Wilderness is a unique space in the local area, a safe (but wild) oasis which allows the local community to enjoy and work with nature, harvest and grow fresh local food, a piece of the countryside in the heart of Catford which backs onto the Pool River. It's a space the community have shaped, a place for children to safely run around, get dirty and learn, a meeting point for families, for neighbours, to make friends and feel part of a community. It is used by many local schools for outdoor learning and a place where the wider community can volunteer, relax in its peacefulness, share and enjoy with other local people of all ages, cultures, faiths and abilities. Unfortunately the tranquility has been recently disrupted and the Wilderness has been the victim of some terrible vandalism over the period of a week. It has been broken into four times and on two occasions the vandals maliciously attacked the hives and tried to drown the honeybees. This mindless destruction of our wonderful pollinators has been deeply upsetting. One colony has been destroyed and hives broken, and the bees that survived have now been removed off site until security is improved. The vandals have also destroyed the pond several times, broken into the shed, slashed the outdoor classroom and water butts, destroyed a hand built fence and the bug hotels - in fact everything that the community created. Whilst volunteers are gradually rebuilding, the bee appeal has been set up on Localgiving to replace a hive, build an apiary cage and increase the security. So that this negative can be turned into a positive the appeal will also help set up Project Buzz, a pilot project to engage local young people in beekeeping and making bee related products.  The bees will return once the security has been improved and an apiary cage built so that the community can continue to learn about our ever so important buzzing friends. If you want to help out then apart from making a donation come and volunteer – no experience necessary and we always need someone to make tea! Check the What’s On page on the website www.wildcatwilderness.org for dates, sign up for the newsletter, plus book a place on one of wonderful free activities and events planned over the summer. Enjoyed this blog? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! When Being Angry Is Not Enough by Leyla Hussein   
    1327 Posted by Maria Devereaux
  • Less than three years ago the Wild Cat Wilderness in Catford was an overgrown, unloved, rubbish strewn site. Today it is a thriving community green space run by the Rushey Green Time Bank. The Wild Cat Wilderness is a unique space in the local area, a safe (but wild) oasis which allows the local community to enjoy and work with nature, harvest and grow fresh local food, a piece of the countryside in the heart of Catford which backs onto the Pool River. It's a space the community have shaped, a place for children to safely run around, get dirty and learn, a meeting point for families, for neighbours, to make friends and feel part of a community. It is used by many local schools for outdoor learning and a place where the wider community can volunteer, relax in its peacefulness, share and enjoy with other local people of all ages, cultures, faiths and abilities. Unfortunately the tranquility has been recently disrupted and the Wilderness has been the victim of some terrible vandalism over the period of a week. It has been broken into four times and on two occasions the vandals maliciously attacked the hives and tried to drown the honeybees. This mindless destruction of our wonderful pollinators has been deeply upsetting. One colony has been destroyed and hives broken, and the bees that survived have now been removed off site until security is improved. The vandals have also destroyed the pond several times, broken into the shed, slashed the outdoor classroom and water butts, destroyed a hand built fence and the bug hotels - in fact everything that the community created. Whilst volunteers are gradually rebuilding, the bee appeal has been set up on Localgiving to replace a hive, build an apiary cage and increase the security. So that this negative can be turned into a positive the appeal will also help set up Project Buzz, a pilot project to engage local young people in beekeeping and making bee related products.  The bees will return once the security has been improved and an apiary cage built so that the community can continue to learn about our ever so important buzzing friends. If you want to help out then apart from making a donation come and volunteer – no experience necessary and we always need someone to make tea! Check the What’s On page on the website www.wildcatwilderness.org for dates, sign up for the newsletter, plus book a place on one of wonderful free activities and events planned over the summer. Enjoyed this blog? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! When Being Angry Is Not Enough by Leyla Hussein   
    Jul 13, 2017 1327
  • 10 Jul 2017
    Leyla Hussein is an anti-FGM activist, psychotherapist, and founder of the Dahlia Project.  I underwent female genital mutilation (FGM) when I was seven years old. I was held down by women I trusted and it left deep scars physically and emotionally. However, it was not until many years later, when I gave birth to my daughter, that anyone talked to me about FGM and offered me help. This practice is shrouded in secrecy and shame with too many women suffering in silence through many years of pain. I was one of these women until a brave health professional asked that all important question, “Have you been cut?”.  That was the start of a long and often difficult journey which will last for the rest of my life. I had to face up to what had been done to me and how it had affected me. FGM cast a shadow over all my life choices and it was only after I began therapy that I could understand this. FGM cannot be undone but survivors can heal. We had to be strong to survive what was done to us and I see that strength every day in the women I now work with. I founded the Dahlia Project to help other women like me. As I came to terms with my experience of FGM I was horrified at how little recognition there was of how this devastating practice affects women psychologically. There were no specialists we could turn to and most of our GPs or other sources of help had little knowledge of FGM. At Dahlia Project we break the silence and provide a safe space and therapeutic support for women living with FGM. These are often women who have no access to other help. They are vulnerable, come from minority communities, are under-represented at all levels of government and policy making and yet they suffer such pain and are in urgent need of our help. They are also the most important asset we have in ending FGM but still they are ignored and not seen as a priority. This is not about austerity or any other easy political soundbite. Political parties in the UK all signed up to stand against FGM decades ago and progress has been made clarifying the law and raising awareness. However, none of them have properly invested in the community based work which is where we will change opinion and end the practice. There are many examples of good practice but these fall by the wayside due to lack of funding and time after time we must start over building relationships and trust. I write this blog as Dahlia Project is under threat. This project is close to my heart and I am so proud of what it has achieved. Working with the incredible women I meet at the project, who have gone through so much, and seeing them heal and support each other, is inspiring. Their determination that FGM ends with them and that their daughters will not be cut fills me with hope for a better future. Working with women who have been cut and supporting them so they can protect their daughters is how we stop FGM. My daughter lives free from FGM because I was helped and I can now protect and empower her. Over the last 3 years the Dahila Project has helped many women but it is the tip of an iceberg as an estimated 137,000 women and girls in England and Wales have undergone FGM and 60,000 girls are at risk. Awareness of FGM amongst the public has risen in recent years but the situation remains bleak for FGM survivors. Earlier this year, the Acton FGM Clinic which was one of the few community based clinics in London for FGM survivors was forced to close due to a lack of funding. Now Dahlia Project is also under threat. Unless we find new sources of income Dahlia Project will no longer be able to provide its unique and life changing services. Politicians from all political parties talk about how they are committed to tackling FGM but to many of us working directly with the women and girls it effects their words offer little hope while the specialist clinics are closing. Only last week at Prime Minister’s Questions Theresa May once again made a strong statement against FGM. While she was speaking we were working to launch the new appeal for emergency funding for the Dahlia Project. Rather than warm words and a pat on the back for being brave what FGM survivors really need is long term investment in the services which help them. Please share this blog and our appeal to help save this valuable service. We must also pressure for a long-term commitment to provide support for FGM survivors. Write to your MP and local councils asking what they are doing to ensure funded, specialist, community based services for FGM survivors. Sometimes being angry or upset about injustice is not enough and we need to focus that anger into positive action which will bring about change.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support!  
    3484 Posted by Leyla Hussein
  • Leyla Hussein is an anti-FGM activist, psychotherapist, and founder of the Dahlia Project.  I underwent female genital mutilation (FGM) when I was seven years old. I was held down by women I trusted and it left deep scars physically and emotionally. However, it was not until many years later, when I gave birth to my daughter, that anyone talked to me about FGM and offered me help. This practice is shrouded in secrecy and shame with too many women suffering in silence through many years of pain. I was one of these women until a brave health professional asked that all important question, “Have you been cut?”.  That was the start of a long and often difficult journey which will last for the rest of my life. I had to face up to what had been done to me and how it had affected me. FGM cast a shadow over all my life choices and it was only after I began therapy that I could understand this. FGM cannot be undone but survivors can heal. We had to be strong to survive what was done to us and I see that strength every day in the women I now work with. I founded the Dahlia Project to help other women like me. As I came to terms with my experience of FGM I was horrified at how little recognition there was of how this devastating practice affects women psychologically. There were no specialists we could turn to and most of our GPs or other sources of help had little knowledge of FGM. At Dahlia Project we break the silence and provide a safe space and therapeutic support for women living with FGM. These are often women who have no access to other help. They are vulnerable, come from minority communities, are under-represented at all levels of government and policy making and yet they suffer such pain and are in urgent need of our help. They are also the most important asset we have in ending FGM but still they are ignored and not seen as a priority. This is not about austerity or any other easy political soundbite. Political parties in the UK all signed up to stand against FGM decades ago and progress has been made clarifying the law and raising awareness. However, none of them have properly invested in the community based work which is where we will change opinion and end the practice. There are many examples of good practice but these fall by the wayside due to lack of funding and time after time we must start over building relationships and trust. I write this blog as Dahlia Project is under threat. This project is close to my heart and I am so proud of what it has achieved. Working with the incredible women I meet at the project, who have gone through so much, and seeing them heal and support each other, is inspiring. Their determination that FGM ends with them and that their daughters will not be cut fills me with hope for a better future. Working with women who have been cut and supporting them so they can protect their daughters is how we stop FGM. My daughter lives free from FGM because I was helped and I can now protect and empower her. Over the last 3 years the Dahila Project has helped many women but it is the tip of an iceberg as an estimated 137,000 women and girls in England and Wales have undergone FGM and 60,000 girls are at risk. Awareness of FGM amongst the public has risen in recent years but the situation remains bleak for FGM survivors. Earlier this year, the Acton FGM Clinic which was one of the few community based clinics in London for FGM survivors was forced to close due to a lack of funding. Now Dahlia Project is also under threat. Unless we find new sources of income Dahlia Project will no longer be able to provide its unique and life changing services. Politicians from all political parties talk about how they are committed to tackling FGM but to many of us working directly with the women and girls it effects their words offer little hope while the specialist clinics are closing. Only last week at Prime Minister’s Questions Theresa May once again made a strong statement against FGM. While she was speaking we were working to launch the new appeal for emergency funding for the Dahlia Project. Rather than warm words and a pat on the back for being brave what FGM survivors really need is long term investment in the services which help them. Please share this blog and our appeal to help save this valuable service. We must also pressure for a long-term commitment to provide support for FGM survivors. Write to your MP and local councils asking what they are doing to ensure funded, specialist, community based services for FGM survivors. Sometimes being angry or upset about injustice is not enough and we need to focus that anger into positive action which will bring about change.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support!  
    Jul 10, 2017 3484
  • 06 Jul 2017
    This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    2150 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    Jul 06, 2017 2150
  • 28 Jun 2017
    At the end of June Localgiving’s North West Regional Development Programme, funded and supported by the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, will be coming to an end. This programme supported local charities who are engaged in projects which benefit the environment, or help people to engage with the natural world. Eligible charities have received a free membership to Localgiving, ongoing one-to-one support in their online fundraising activities, and up to £500 of the money they raised online was matched through funding provided by the People’s Postcode Lottery and their players. By 22nd June, 69 charities in the region were online and receiving support from Localgiving, and have raised a fantastic £103,216.15! This is money that will make a real difference to the charities supported, and the 1,000s of people they support and work with on a daily basis. To celebrate these charities and their achievements, here are some of their stories, and what they have done with their donations. Transition New Mills Transition New Mills are a community group who look to run a range of projects in New Mills and the surrounding area, which will preserve and conserve the local environment, and reduce reliance on carbon emitting power sources. They told us that, thanks to the funds raised and matched, ”New Mills Primary School now has an outdoor classroom and children are sowing and germinating seeds, growing produce and then either eating what they have grown, or ‘up-selling’ it to allow them to buy more seeds and plants the following year. For many children, it is the first time they have done anything like this and the children are so excited by it. The school in question are now looking to expand upon this and are fundraising themselves to try and build a purpose built poly tunnel so that they can grow all year round. Other schools in the area are so impressed that they are looking to build their own outside classrooms too. The whole project has been brilliant.”    The outdoor classroom at New Mills Primary School, paid for by donations from the public and match funds from the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery.   Salford Foodbank Salford Foodbank provides emergency food and support to people in moments of crisis, using food donated by members of the public and by local businesses. Thanks to support from Localgiving, they have been able to raise over £9,000 in online donations from more than 300 donors. Donations have been used to help pay for core running costs (which charities often find hard to fund), as well as in expanding the space available for donations of food, so the Salford Foodbank can stock more food and support more people in crisis. Mark from Salford Foodbank said “We have been delighted with the training and support given by Local Giving. Attending training sessions, together with 1-2-1 support has been invaluable for our charity as it is helping more people than ever.   Salford Foodbank advertising fundraising opportunities in the Great Manchester Run.  Fundraiser Gary training for the Great Manchester Run           Rotunda Ltd Rotunda are a community organisation based in Liverpool, who run a number training, educational and vocational courses for over 2,000 local people in the city. Rotunda had never tried online fundraising before, but have been able to raise £3,404 in donations through Localgiving. They have used these funds to “purchase a piece of land to be used as a community green space, the ‘Kirkdale Folly’, which also includes a green gym and piece of public artwork (the ‘Folly’) that was commissioned when Liverpool was the UK Capital of Culture. We’re planning to develop this green space to include an arts and wellbeing pavilion, helping a wide range of people in one of the most disadvantaged areas in the UK.   Rotunda’s Garden Café, where users grow the food they then cook and eat! The Kirkdale Folly green space bought by Rotunda.     The programme in the North West is now coming to a close, but we run similar programmes in Wales, Northern Ireland, London, and the West of England. A huge thank you to the charities and donors who took part in the programme, and to the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery who funded it. All that remains is for me to say goodbye. Goodbye! Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       How Charities can tap into the hyperlocal by Zoe Amar The Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker 4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    1534 Posted by Joe Burns
  • At the end of June Localgiving’s North West Regional Development Programme, funded and supported by the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, will be coming to an end. This programme supported local charities who are engaged in projects which benefit the environment, or help people to engage with the natural world. Eligible charities have received a free membership to Localgiving, ongoing one-to-one support in their online fundraising activities, and up to £500 of the money they raised online was matched through funding provided by the People’s Postcode Lottery and their players. By 22nd June, 69 charities in the region were online and receiving support from Localgiving, and have raised a fantastic £103,216.15! This is money that will make a real difference to the charities supported, and the 1,000s of people they support and work with on a daily basis. To celebrate these charities and their achievements, here are some of their stories, and what they have done with their donations. Transition New Mills Transition New Mills are a community group who look to run a range of projects in New Mills and the surrounding area, which will preserve and conserve the local environment, and reduce reliance on carbon emitting power sources. They told us that, thanks to the funds raised and matched, ”New Mills Primary School now has an outdoor classroom and children are sowing and germinating seeds, growing produce and then either eating what they have grown, or ‘up-selling’ it to allow them to buy more seeds and plants the following year. For many children, it is the first time they have done anything like this and the children are so excited by it. The school in question are now looking to expand upon this and are fundraising themselves to try and build a purpose built poly tunnel so that they can grow all year round. Other schools in the area are so impressed that they are looking to build their own outside classrooms too. The whole project has been brilliant.”    The outdoor classroom at New Mills Primary School, paid for by donations from the public and match funds from the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery.   Salford Foodbank Salford Foodbank provides emergency food and support to people in moments of crisis, using food donated by members of the public and by local businesses. Thanks to support from Localgiving, they have been able to raise over £9,000 in online donations from more than 300 donors. Donations have been used to help pay for core running costs (which charities often find hard to fund), as well as in expanding the space available for donations of food, so the Salford Foodbank can stock more food and support more people in crisis. Mark from Salford Foodbank said “We have been delighted with the training and support given by Local Giving. Attending training sessions, together with 1-2-1 support has been invaluable for our charity as it is helping more people than ever.   Salford Foodbank advertising fundraising opportunities in the Great Manchester Run.  Fundraiser Gary training for the Great Manchester Run           Rotunda Ltd Rotunda are a community organisation based in Liverpool, who run a number training, educational and vocational courses for over 2,000 local people in the city. Rotunda had never tried online fundraising before, but have been able to raise £3,404 in donations through Localgiving. They have used these funds to “purchase a piece of land to be used as a community green space, the ‘Kirkdale Folly’, which also includes a green gym and piece of public artwork (the ‘Folly’) that was commissioned when Liverpool was the UK Capital of Culture. We’re planning to develop this green space to include an arts and wellbeing pavilion, helping a wide range of people in one of the most disadvantaged areas in the UK.   Rotunda’s Garden Café, where users grow the food they then cook and eat! The Kirkdale Folly green space bought by Rotunda.     The programme in the North West is now coming to a close, but we run similar programmes in Wales, Northern Ireland, London, and the West of England. A huge thank you to the charities and donors who took part in the programme, and to the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery who funded it. All that remains is for me to say goodbye. Goodbye! Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       How Charities can tap into the hyperlocal by Zoe Amar The Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker 4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    Jun 28, 2017 1534
  • 08 Jun 2017
    Tennis2Be is a London based charity dedicated to making tennis an accessible and inclusive sport. Their annual flagship, the ‘Craic Cup’ plays a key part in achieving this mission,  with players of all ages and abilities attending. With this year’s cup just ten days away we caught up with Tennis2Be’s Jay Macpherson. Tell us about the inspiration behind the Craic Cup? What have been your Craic Cup highlights ? “Noticing how more and more people show up every year. There is a real demand for it, enough people to create healthy competition whilst also taking playing levels into account. Visits from our Patron, Rudolph Walker from East Enders,and the Major. The oldest and youngest attendees 3-85 years! At the heart of what we do as a charity is to provide sports and education, we’ve been consistent in involving grassroots organisations and having our ear to the ground each year then I'd call that a highlight reel in itself." What do people have to look forward to this year? “The numbers are getting larger each year, over 80 people attended, giving players the opportunity to play as many people on the day as possible. We've also secured the National Tennis Centre again this year which is a 40 million pound tennis venue built for the pros. If you want to get motivated to play tennis, there is no better place to start than here!” Who can get involved and how? “The beauty of charity events is that absolutely anyone can get involved. All you need is to sign up through our website at www.tennis2be.com . Places are limited and would advise everyone to sign up as soon as they can. We also have special volunteer roles for the Craic Cup where people can gain experience on organising an event of this magnitude, roles in data entry, social media, trusteeship and more." How have you used Localgiving to raise funds for this tournament and your other activities? “Localgiving was an amazing platform that we used initially to try and get donations incentivised by the match funding (London Regional Development Programme). We found Localgiving has much more functionality including appeals and fundraisers, all of which we have explored with fantastic results.This is also thanks to Conor; our point of contact from Localgiving, who was very supportive and patient during the early stages of our understanding, always there when we need both in person and on the phone. The way we use the funding is mainly for providing equipment, reaching out to communities, increasing our programme intake, venue hire, and much more. For example a £45 donation can provide 5 children with a tennis lesson plus educational element. The value of our donations and the ease with which this was done through the platform, says volumes about Localgiving's mission is to strengthen UK communities by safeguarding the sustainability of the local voluntary sector. We really appreciate all the support from our patrons on Localgiving, you guys are awesome!" What recommendations would you give to other groups about how to make the most of their Localgiving page? “A couple of things. Filling out your profile as well as you can to make sure everyone knows exactly where you come from and where you intend to go is absolutely key for charities and organisations wishing to make a difference. You need stand out and provide something unique for your supporters so they can relate to you as closely as possible. An additional recommendation I would give is make use of fundraisers! Even if you get your small team of 3 or 4 individuals to try raising money it adds up insanely quickly. It can also be a ton of fun seeing what people are coming up with on the site, from bold marathons to baths in baked beans, there's a level of magic.” To find out more about the Craic cup or register to take part you can visit: https://www.tennis2be.com/tennis2be-craic-cup-2017  Enjoyed this blog? You may also like: Maximising your fundraising potential New Grant Opportunities from the United Way UK
    2059 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Tennis2Be is a London based charity dedicated to making tennis an accessible and inclusive sport. Their annual flagship, the ‘Craic Cup’ plays a key part in achieving this mission,  with players of all ages and abilities attending. With this year’s cup just ten days away we caught up with Tennis2Be’s Jay Macpherson. Tell us about the inspiration behind the Craic Cup? What have been your Craic Cup highlights ? “Noticing how more and more people show up every year. There is a real demand for it, enough people to create healthy competition whilst also taking playing levels into account. Visits from our Patron, Rudolph Walker from East Enders,and the Major. The oldest and youngest attendees 3-85 years! At the heart of what we do as a charity is to provide sports and education, we’ve been consistent in involving grassroots organisations and having our ear to the ground each year then I'd call that a highlight reel in itself." What do people have to look forward to this year? “The numbers are getting larger each year, over 80 people attended, giving players the opportunity to play as many people on the day as possible. We've also secured the National Tennis Centre again this year which is a 40 million pound tennis venue built for the pros. If you want to get motivated to play tennis, there is no better place to start than here!” Who can get involved and how? “The beauty of charity events is that absolutely anyone can get involved. All you need is to sign up through our website at www.tennis2be.com . Places are limited and would advise everyone to sign up as soon as they can. We also have special volunteer roles for the Craic Cup where people can gain experience on organising an event of this magnitude, roles in data entry, social media, trusteeship and more." How have you used Localgiving to raise funds for this tournament and your other activities? “Localgiving was an amazing platform that we used initially to try and get donations incentivised by the match funding (London Regional Development Programme). We found Localgiving has much more functionality including appeals and fundraisers, all of which we have explored with fantastic results.This is also thanks to Conor; our point of contact from Localgiving, who was very supportive and patient during the early stages of our understanding, always there when we need both in person and on the phone. The way we use the funding is mainly for providing equipment, reaching out to communities, increasing our programme intake, venue hire, and much more. For example a £45 donation can provide 5 children with a tennis lesson plus educational element. The value of our donations and the ease with which this was done through the platform, says volumes about Localgiving's mission is to strengthen UK communities by safeguarding the sustainability of the local voluntary sector. We really appreciate all the support from our patrons on Localgiving, you guys are awesome!" What recommendations would you give to other groups about how to make the most of their Localgiving page? “A couple of things. Filling out your profile as well as you can to make sure everyone knows exactly where you come from and where you intend to go is absolutely key for charities and organisations wishing to make a difference. You need stand out and provide something unique for your supporters so they can relate to you as closely as possible. An additional recommendation I would give is make use of fundraisers! Even if you get your small team of 3 or 4 individuals to try raising money it adds up insanely quickly. It can also be a ton of fun seeing what people are coming up with on the site, from bold marathons to baths in baked beans, there's a level of magic.” To find out more about the Craic cup or register to take part you can visit: https://www.tennis2be.com/tennis2be-craic-cup-2017  Enjoyed this blog? You may also like: Maximising your fundraising potential New Grant Opportunities from the United Way UK
    Jun 08, 2017 2059
  • 06 Jun 2017
    United Way UK has announced new 'Give Local' grants for 2017. United Way UK collaborates with businesses and community partners in the voluntary sector to achieve positive change in education, income stability and health. What are ‘Give Local’ grants? 'Give Local' grants are £1,000 grants given to small charities and community groups who are benefitting local people in need. United Way believes that every person and organisation should be able to support their own, local community. ‘Give Local’ is a way to do this. People and businesses collectively give to a 'Give Local' pot, and 100% of the funds which they donate are then awarded to charities based within and benefitting their local community. Last year’s grants benefitted thousands of people in nearly 30 communities across the country. This film gives a few case studies Who can apply for a grant? The grants are available to small charities and organisations who help people within United Way's 'Give Local' communities. To find out if you work within one, and to download an application form, visit United Way Uk's dedicated web page before 30th June 2017.  Want to get involved? If you are a business and would like to establish ‘Give Local’ to benefit your local community through payroll giving, fundraising or volunteering, please do get in touch. Special thanks to the employees of Costco who ‘Give Local’ through payroll giving.   
  • United Way UK has announced new 'Give Local' grants for 2017. United Way UK collaborates with businesses and community partners in the voluntary sector to achieve positive change in education, income stability and health. What are ‘Give Local’ grants? 'Give Local' grants are £1,000 grants given to small charities and community groups who are benefitting local people in need. United Way believes that every person and organisation should be able to support their own, local community. ‘Give Local’ is a way to do this. People and businesses collectively give to a 'Give Local' pot, and 100% of the funds which they donate are then awarded to charities based within and benefitting their local community. Last year’s grants benefitted thousands of people in nearly 30 communities across the country. This film gives a few case studies Who can apply for a grant? The grants are available to small charities and organisations who help people within United Way's 'Give Local' communities. To find out if you work within one, and to download an application form, visit United Way Uk's dedicated web page before 30th June 2017.  Want to get involved? If you are a business and would like to establish ‘Give Local’ to benefit your local community through payroll giving, fundraising or volunteering, please do get in touch. Special thanks to the employees of Costco who ‘Give Local’ through payroll giving.   
    Jun 06, 2017 2416
  • 31 May 2017
    At the Foundation for Social Improvement (FSI) we support small and local charities and community organisations (with a turnover under £1.5 million), providing free or very heavily subsidised training and support. We were established in 2007 to help these organisations keep their doors open for the vulnerable groups they work with. We do this via a learning programme which focusses on fundraising, governance, measuring and demonstrating impact and strategy and planning. Unsurprisingly, by far the most popular area for support is fundraising. At a time when charities are facing unprecedented funding cuts and an increasing demand for services (REF) it is more important now than ever before that we are maximising our potential to secure funds. Some of our top tips to help you do this include: Get your house in order How are you supposed to effectively support the sustainability for your organisation if you don’t know exactly how much you need to fundraise and where you are going to get it? Developing a fundraising strategy can often be dismissed as a paper exercise, but actually this is the road map to your fundraising success. It builds a clear plan of activity to be followed whilst also evaluating the activities that are likely to bring you the greatest return on investment. It obviously can’t be denied that it takes time and effort to build a fundraising strategy, however the direction it provides will support you to maintain a fundraising focus which will help save you time later down the line when you are attempting to deliver against fundraising targets. Evaluate and Review as you go It is very east to fall into a trap of activity simply because ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it’. Reviewing and refreshing your activity is essential to ensure you truly are investing your time and resource in the most fruitful fundraising activities for your charity. The only way you will know to put a stop to the activities that don’t bring in the required return is to evaluate each one against key performance indicators or targets and not being afraid to say lets try something different. This is where your fundraising strategy will come in handy again as you will have thought out in advance what you would expect to see from your individual fundraising activities to help you to look at your fundraising efforts objectively. Stick to the plan (sort of) Rather than trying to overstretch and have too many fingers in the different fundraising pies, it is better to look realistically at what you can achieve with your resource and work on doing these well. There are only so many hours in a day so there’s no point in setting yourself up to fail, instead you will be supporting your success if you focus on doing a few things really well, rather than trying to do everything at once. There will be time to expand your activity when your focus pays off and you are able to gain extra resource. At the same time it’s also important to know when it’s appropriate to engage with unexpected opportunities or external events that can support your fundraising activity as flexibility in fund development is also important. A safe way to do this is to establish a process on how to decide whether a new opportunity is worth going for, whether it’s getting sign off from a fundraising steering committee or your Trustees or bringing new ideas to your manager for sign off. Use Small Charity Week to your advantage As well as providing a support programme for charities, the FSI are also the organisation behind Small Charity Week. This year it is taking place between 19th-24th June and the week is packed full of opportunities to support your charity to raise vital funds and your profile. The full agenda can be found on the Small Charity Week website but also includes opportunities such as: Places at the FSI’s annual Fundraising Conference in London – there are only a few left so book today A matched fund with LocalGiving providing £25,000 worth of funding An eBay Auction where you keep all of the funds for the items you provide and have the chance of winning £2,000 of matched funds The chance to fundraise from eBay shoppers by submitting a 90-character fundraising message (deadline 2nd June) 1:1 Fundraising Advice via the FSI’s Big Advice Day – expertise comes from a mixture of funders and fundraisers Free fundraising guides to support you to run your own events and activities Leetchi’s money pot competition for the chance to gain an additional £1,000 of funding The opportunity to win cash prizes by asking your supporters to say why they love you on social media These are just some of the free activities available during the week, with six days of separate activities check out the full agenda to make sure you’re not missing out Full details on www.smallcharityweek.com or follow @SCWeek2017 for breaking news. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Subconscious Effects of Storytelling in Charity Marketing Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs  
    3818 Posted by Conchita Garcia
  • At the Foundation for Social Improvement (FSI) we support small and local charities and community organisations (with a turnover under £1.5 million), providing free or very heavily subsidised training and support. We were established in 2007 to help these organisations keep their doors open for the vulnerable groups they work with. We do this via a learning programme which focusses on fundraising, governance, measuring and demonstrating impact and strategy and planning. Unsurprisingly, by far the most popular area for support is fundraising. At a time when charities are facing unprecedented funding cuts and an increasing demand for services (REF) it is more important now than ever before that we are maximising our potential to secure funds. Some of our top tips to help you do this include: Get your house in order How are you supposed to effectively support the sustainability for your organisation if you don’t know exactly how much you need to fundraise and where you are going to get it? Developing a fundraising strategy can often be dismissed as a paper exercise, but actually this is the road map to your fundraising success. It builds a clear plan of activity to be followed whilst also evaluating the activities that are likely to bring you the greatest return on investment. It obviously can’t be denied that it takes time and effort to build a fundraising strategy, however the direction it provides will support you to maintain a fundraising focus which will help save you time later down the line when you are attempting to deliver against fundraising targets. Evaluate and Review as you go It is very east to fall into a trap of activity simply because ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it’. Reviewing and refreshing your activity is essential to ensure you truly are investing your time and resource in the most fruitful fundraising activities for your charity. The only way you will know to put a stop to the activities that don’t bring in the required return is to evaluate each one against key performance indicators or targets and not being afraid to say lets try something different. This is where your fundraising strategy will come in handy again as you will have thought out in advance what you would expect to see from your individual fundraising activities to help you to look at your fundraising efforts objectively. Stick to the plan (sort of) Rather than trying to overstretch and have too many fingers in the different fundraising pies, it is better to look realistically at what you can achieve with your resource and work on doing these well. There are only so many hours in a day so there’s no point in setting yourself up to fail, instead you will be supporting your success if you focus on doing a few things really well, rather than trying to do everything at once. There will be time to expand your activity when your focus pays off and you are able to gain extra resource. At the same time it’s also important to know when it’s appropriate to engage with unexpected opportunities or external events that can support your fundraising activity as flexibility in fund development is also important. A safe way to do this is to establish a process on how to decide whether a new opportunity is worth going for, whether it’s getting sign off from a fundraising steering committee or your Trustees or bringing new ideas to your manager for sign off. Use Small Charity Week to your advantage As well as providing a support programme for charities, the FSI are also the organisation behind Small Charity Week. This year it is taking place between 19th-24th June and the week is packed full of opportunities to support your charity to raise vital funds and your profile. The full agenda can be found on the Small Charity Week website but also includes opportunities such as: Places at the FSI’s annual Fundraising Conference in London – there are only a few left so book today A matched fund with LocalGiving providing £25,000 worth of funding An eBay Auction where you keep all of the funds for the items you provide and have the chance of winning £2,000 of matched funds The chance to fundraise from eBay shoppers by submitting a 90-character fundraising message (deadline 2nd June) 1:1 Fundraising Advice via the FSI’s Big Advice Day – expertise comes from a mixture of funders and fundraisers Free fundraising guides to support you to run your own events and activities Leetchi’s money pot competition for the chance to gain an additional £1,000 of funding The opportunity to win cash prizes by asking your supporters to say why they love you on social media These are just some of the free activities available during the week, with six days of separate activities check out the full agenda to make sure you’re not missing out Full details on www.smallcharityweek.com or follow @SCWeek2017 for breaking news. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Subconscious Effects of Storytelling in Charity Marketing Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs  
    May 31, 2017 3818