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264 blogs
  • 08 May 2017
    On 28th May, Mancunian runners of all abilities will be taking part in the Great Manchester Run, and will be running either a 10k or, for the daring, a half marathon. Many of these runners will be raising money for brilliant, Greater Manchester based local charities. To celebrate the efforts of these fantastic fundraisers we’ve decided to focus on one fundraiser, Bec Greenwood, who is raising money for Salford Foodbank. We asked her why she’s running; why she supports Salford Foodbank; and any tips she has for other fundraisers. Why & how did you decide to take part in the Great Manchester Run? "I work full time in TV and have irregular hours so can't commit to a regular volunteering rota but wanted to support those in need." "I've been volunteering at collections with the Salford Food Bank for a few years and when the 10k Run was coming up I thought it would be a great way to raise some much needed funds. I've never done any running before, which I think is what has made most people sponsor me out of shock!" "I've been trying to do around 3 runs a week and I'm yet to enjoy it or experience the famous 'runners high' but the fact that I'm doing it for such a good cause makes it all the worthwhile!" Why are you raising money for Salford Foodbank in particular? "I am incredibly humbled by the work that the full time staff and volunteers at the food bank do and always wish I could do more." "I find it obscene that in this day and age, people have to use food banks to help support their families as the government don't provide the infrastructure to help those in need. I watched Daniel Blake last year and was incredibly moved by the food bank scene. I wanted to do something to help those in need but didn't know how I could help them directly. The best way I can see to help is to donate my time and any sponsorship I can gain." Any advice for future fundraisers on how to get donations through & prepare for your challenge? "I had chosen a flattering picture for my fundraising page, but it was only when I changed it to a mid run/sweaty and knackered picture that I started to get more sponsorship! So I think being honest if you're finding it difficult. You don't have to pretend to find the challenge easy. People seem more impressed if you're finding it hard!" A huge thank you to Bec, and indeed all the fundraisers on Localgiving who are raising money on behalf of local charities across the UK! If her answers have inspired you to fundraise for a local charity, why not sign up to do so? It’s really quick and easy to set up and fundraising page, and there are 1000s of great, local charities online at Localgiving for whom your support would be valuable.   For further information about fundraising, why not check out these other posts in our blog? Rod’s Top Tips for Running & Fun and Funds Wise Words from Alistair Still, Local Hero Champion 2016
    1825 Posted by Joe Burns
  • On 28th May, Mancunian runners of all abilities will be taking part in the Great Manchester Run, and will be running either a 10k or, for the daring, a half marathon. Many of these runners will be raising money for brilliant, Greater Manchester based local charities. To celebrate the efforts of these fantastic fundraisers we’ve decided to focus on one fundraiser, Bec Greenwood, who is raising money for Salford Foodbank. We asked her why she’s running; why she supports Salford Foodbank; and any tips she has for other fundraisers. Why & how did you decide to take part in the Great Manchester Run? "I work full time in TV and have irregular hours so can't commit to a regular volunteering rota but wanted to support those in need." "I've been volunteering at collections with the Salford Food Bank for a few years and when the 10k Run was coming up I thought it would be a great way to raise some much needed funds. I've never done any running before, which I think is what has made most people sponsor me out of shock!" "I've been trying to do around 3 runs a week and I'm yet to enjoy it or experience the famous 'runners high' but the fact that I'm doing it for such a good cause makes it all the worthwhile!" Why are you raising money for Salford Foodbank in particular? "I am incredibly humbled by the work that the full time staff and volunteers at the food bank do and always wish I could do more." "I find it obscene that in this day and age, people have to use food banks to help support their families as the government don't provide the infrastructure to help those in need. I watched Daniel Blake last year and was incredibly moved by the food bank scene. I wanted to do something to help those in need but didn't know how I could help them directly. The best way I can see to help is to donate my time and any sponsorship I can gain." Any advice for future fundraisers on how to get donations through & prepare for your challenge? "I had chosen a flattering picture for my fundraising page, but it was only when I changed it to a mid run/sweaty and knackered picture that I started to get more sponsorship! So I think being honest if you're finding it difficult. You don't have to pretend to find the challenge easy. People seem more impressed if you're finding it hard!" A huge thank you to Bec, and indeed all the fundraisers on Localgiving who are raising money on behalf of local charities across the UK! If her answers have inspired you to fundraise for a local charity, why not sign up to do so? It’s really quick and easy to set up and fundraising page, and there are 1000s of great, local charities online at Localgiving for whom your support would be valuable.   For further information about fundraising, why not check out these other posts in our blog? Rod’s Top Tips for Running & Fun and Funds Wise Words from Alistair Still, Local Hero Champion 2016
    May 08, 2017 1825
  • 03 May 2017
    A couple of years ago, a friend of mine introduced me to an NGO for rescuing chained or caged dogs. Their Facebook page had sweet intros to all the animals awaiting adoption and featured photos of their daily activities at the rescue center. Over time, I got quite familiar with the dogs there just through their social media feed. Even though the organization is in a different state and I’ve never actually met the dogs, I felt a personal bond and continue to donate towards their well being, ever so often.   That bond is developed through the compelling power of storytelling. Well, sure, as a dog lover, I’ve always had a soft spot for those fuzzy goofballs. However, Storytelling can help get you build an emotional connection between the audience and any character by affecting their subconscious. Let’s have a look at how these subconscious effects come into play and the approach to making it work in marketing your charity. 1) Help the audience reach the conclusion One of the primary rules of storytelling is “Show; don’t tell”. Instead of stating facts about the good guy and the bad guy, the characters are introduced through their actions and decisions. We start to root for the protagonist because the story aligns our values and morals with whatever the protagonist is fighting for. Since the story guides our emotions through these subconscious decisions, the choice of which side we relate to doesn’t seem forced upon us. In a similar way, your charity has to let the audience come to the conclusion that you are working for something positive. Giving them facts and figures is fine but real-world examples allow them to decide whether they support your cause. 2. Offer a fresh take on a common story structure If you look closely at the overall story of classic books and movies, they are almost the same - a hero taking on something beyond their depth, a larger-than-life villain threatening to ruin the world forever and even parallel ups and downs of the characters as the hero journeys to save the world. But every time the storyteller gives their personal spin on the characters and what’s at stake in the world. This makes the audience stay hooked throughout. When it comes to your charity, come up with a fresh perspective to the problem so that people can imagine their contribution doing its part to lead to a better world. 3. Build trust through familiarity In stories, the protagonist is never someone very different from us. Even if the story is set in a different world or features characters that aren’t human, the storyteller gives them a touch of personality people can relate to. That is because when our brain encounters something familiar, it makes us comfortable. We are more likely to trust in someone that comes across as familiar. This subconscious effect is very important when it comes to building trust for your charity. Create a logo and an identity that people can recognise. Have an active social media presence and talk about the progress made through your activities. 4. Have stories of redemption to share A redemption arc is another classic storytelling element that makes the hero a star in our eyes - halfway through the story, the hero faces the main villain, loses the battle and, is often, left in a poor state. But being the hero, he doesn’t quit. The rise of the fallen hero makes us root for his cause even more. Share stories where your charity or someone you’ve worked with goes on against the insurmountable odds working against them. You gain more admiration for trying than for success. 5. Show how the world you are trying to fix is broken Storytellers make a point to drive home the bleak reality in store in case the protagonist fails. It is not a world people want to be a part of. In fact, it is made clear how the world will change and end up worse than how it was at the outset of the tale if the bad guy is not stopped. Projecting this dark future is important to ensure no one wants the villain to win. Of course, in the real world, the cause you’re working for might not be so dire. People will only be willing to do their bit if you make sure they can envision how bad things would be if you did nothing. Project the alternative and help the audience see how it will worsen the situation in the future. A lot more people will be willing to step up and do their part for your initiative. These subconscious effects are part of human thought and reaction. They have been used in storytelling for centuries to guide the audience’s emotional journey. Use these in your charity marketing to increase support for your cause. Augustus Franklin is the founder and CEO of CallHub, a California-based Voice and SMS service company bridging the communication gap for political campaigns and advocacy groups. When he is not working, he is either making toys with his kids or training for a marathon. If you enjoyed this article you may also like: 3 Ways Small Charities can get Expertise They Need for Free How to be a better donor in one easy step Developing a Fundraising Plan - Strategies and Ideas  
    3032 Posted by Augustus Franklin
  • A couple of years ago, a friend of mine introduced me to an NGO for rescuing chained or caged dogs. Their Facebook page had sweet intros to all the animals awaiting adoption and featured photos of their daily activities at the rescue center. Over time, I got quite familiar with the dogs there just through their social media feed. Even though the organization is in a different state and I’ve never actually met the dogs, I felt a personal bond and continue to donate towards their well being, ever so often.   That bond is developed through the compelling power of storytelling. Well, sure, as a dog lover, I’ve always had a soft spot for those fuzzy goofballs. However, Storytelling can help get you build an emotional connection between the audience and any character by affecting their subconscious. Let’s have a look at how these subconscious effects come into play and the approach to making it work in marketing your charity. 1) Help the audience reach the conclusion One of the primary rules of storytelling is “Show; don’t tell”. Instead of stating facts about the good guy and the bad guy, the characters are introduced through their actions and decisions. We start to root for the protagonist because the story aligns our values and morals with whatever the protagonist is fighting for. Since the story guides our emotions through these subconscious decisions, the choice of which side we relate to doesn’t seem forced upon us. In a similar way, your charity has to let the audience come to the conclusion that you are working for something positive. Giving them facts and figures is fine but real-world examples allow them to decide whether they support your cause. 2. Offer a fresh take on a common story structure If you look closely at the overall story of classic books and movies, they are almost the same - a hero taking on something beyond their depth, a larger-than-life villain threatening to ruin the world forever and even parallel ups and downs of the characters as the hero journeys to save the world. But every time the storyteller gives their personal spin on the characters and what’s at stake in the world. This makes the audience stay hooked throughout. When it comes to your charity, come up with a fresh perspective to the problem so that people can imagine their contribution doing its part to lead to a better world. 3. Build trust through familiarity In stories, the protagonist is never someone very different from us. Even if the story is set in a different world or features characters that aren’t human, the storyteller gives them a touch of personality people can relate to. That is because when our brain encounters something familiar, it makes us comfortable. We are more likely to trust in someone that comes across as familiar. This subconscious effect is very important when it comes to building trust for your charity. Create a logo and an identity that people can recognise. Have an active social media presence and talk about the progress made through your activities. 4. Have stories of redemption to share A redemption arc is another classic storytelling element that makes the hero a star in our eyes - halfway through the story, the hero faces the main villain, loses the battle and, is often, left in a poor state. But being the hero, he doesn’t quit. The rise of the fallen hero makes us root for his cause even more. Share stories where your charity or someone you’ve worked with goes on against the insurmountable odds working against them. You gain more admiration for trying than for success. 5. Show how the world you are trying to fix is broken Storytellers make a point to drive home the bleak reality in store in case the protagonist fails. It is not a world people want to be a part of. In fact, it is made clear how the world will change and end up worse than how it was at the outset of the tale if the bad guy is not stopped. Projecting this dark future is important to ensure no one wants the villain to win. Of course, in the real world, the cause you’re working for might not be so dire. People will only be willing to do their bit if you make sure they can envision how bad things would be if you did nothing. Project the alternative and help the audience see how it will worsen the situation in the future. A lot more people will be willing to step up and do their part for your initiative. These subconscious effects are part of human thought and reaction. They have been used in storytelling for centuries to guide the audience’s emotional journey. Use these in your charity marketing to increase support for your cause. Augustus Franklin is the founder and CEO of CallHub, a California-based Voice and SMS service company bridging the communication gap for political campaigns and advocacy groups. When he is not working, he is either making toys with his kids or training for a marathon. If you enjoyed this article you may also like: 3 Ways Small Charities can get Expertise They Need for Free How to be a better donor in one easy step Developing a Fundraising Plan - Strategies and Ideas  
    May 03, 2017 3032
  • 02 May 2017
    Local Hero 2017 has now come to an end. Thank you to everyone who participated in the campaign and a huge congratulations to those fundraisers who made it onto our leaderboard. The race was hard fought with participants jostling for position right until clock struck midnight on Monday 1st May. During the campaign 341 fundraisers raised £118k for 190 local charities and community groups from across the UK. We are delighted to announce that the winner of this year’s campaign is …  Adam Curtis Adam secured an impressive 261 unique sponsors, raising over £2000 for The Russell School plus an extra £1000 in prize money. £5,000 in prizes have been awarded to the causes supported by the top 20 fundraisers. A full list of our prize winners can be found on our leaderboard here. Participants have been ranked according to the number of unique online donors from whom they secured sponsorship throughout the month.  Once again, thank you all for making Local Hero 2017 such as success and remember, our next campaign, the Small Charities Week Match Fund, is just around the corner.  For advice on how to make the most of this campaign why not sign up to our webinars today!  
  • Local Hero 2017 has now come to an end. Thank you to everyone who participated in the campaign and a huge congratulations to those fundraisers who made it onto our leaderboard. The race was hard fought with participants jostling for position right until clock struck midnight on Monday 1st May. During the campaign 341 fundraisers raised £118k for 190 local charities and community groups from across the UK. We are delighted to announce that the winner of this year’s campaign is …  Adam Curtis Adam secured an impressive 261 unique sponsors, raising over £2000 for The Russell School plus an extra £1000 in prize money. £5,000 in prizes have been awarded to the causes supported by the top 20 fundraisers. A full list of our prize winners can be found on our leaderboard here. Participants have been ranked according to the number of unique online donors from whom they secured sponsorship throughout the month.  Once again, thank you all for making Local Hero 2017 such as success and remember, our next campaign, the Small Charities Week Match Fund, is just around the corner.  For advice on how to make the most of this campaign why not sign up to our webinars today!  
    May 02, 2017 1594
  • 19 Apr 2017
     The Big Heart Network - the North West's marketing skills and support network for charities and social enterprises - share their top Twitter tips  Do you feel overwhelmed by social media? Has it started to feel like a massive time suck? Maintaining a professional and productive online presence can be hard graft especially for organisations facing staff or budget constraints.  But take heart! We have four time-saving Twitter tips that will make you fall back in love with the social media channel that never stops tweeting.  Define your audience  Tweeting out great content all hours of the day and getting no interaction can be soul-destroying. So sit back and take stock.  Decide who you really want to reach. Are you keen to position your organisation as expert in its sector, do want to keep staff and volunteers up to date, attract the interest of the media or reach current supporters and potential donors?  Once you have zeroed in on the target audience, work out when they will be online for the best chance of your tweet being seen by them.  Use analytic tools available in Twitter or another app to confirm the optimum time through test tweets.  Content calendar  Trying to come up with new ideas every morning is stressful and the quality of the content does suffer.  Stop right now! Instead take time to construct a media calendar, populated with your organisation's events, campaigns, key occasions in your sector and external diary dates. Breaking news can be posted around these diaried events - instant inspiration and you will never forget to tweet about an important date ever again.  Curate rather create  It is hugely time-consuming to create enough original matter to populate a Twitter feed. The message becomes monotonous if your audience is only ever hearing one voice. So, to kill two birds with one stone follow the rule of thirds. For every original tweet, retweet another account and reply to someone else.  Using the quote retweet function allows you another 140 words to add a commentary to expand your thoughts on the original tweet.  The rule of thirds provides variety, additional value, encourages engagement as well as positions your organisation as a thought leader in its sector  A word of warning: make sure you only direct retweet trustworthy sources and read or watch links in their entirety to avoid any unpleasant surprises.  Time-saving tools  Don't get caught in the cycle of having to post tweets 'live'. Set aside some time to schedule a number of tweets in advance using tools such as Buffer or Hootsuite. It an especially efficient way to deal with diaried events from your content calendar.  In the same vein, Hootlet is a free browser plugin which allows you to immediately add shortened page URL and a message with the link's title to your Hootsuite schedule without having to open Hootsuite and copy the link across – great for quick curated content. Grace Dyke is Strategic Director at PR and Communications social enterprise, Yellow Jigsaw. The Yellow Jigsaw team manage PR and fundraising campaigns for regional and national charities, as well as managing the North West's only dedicated skills and support network for charities and social enterprises, the Big Heart Network.  Big Heart Network puts its heart and soul into helping charities and social enterprises. Contact us on hello@yellowjigsaw.co.uk and visit our page to see when the next lunch and learn social media sessions will be held. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero: The half way leaders are... Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times      
    1682 Posted by Grace Dyke
  •  The Big Heart Network - the North West's marketing skills and support network for charities and social enterprises - share their top Twitter tips  Do you feel overwhelmed by social media? Has it started to feel like a massive time suck? Maintaining a professional and productive online presence can be hard graft especially for organisations facing staff or budget constraints.  But take heart! We have four time-saving Twitter tips that will make you fall back in love with the social media channel that never stops tweeting.  Define your audience  Tweeting out great content all hours of the day and getting no interaction can be soul-destroying. So sit back and take stock.  Decide who you really want to reach. Are you keen to position your organisation as expert in its sector, do want to keep staff and volunteers up to date, attract the interest of the media or reach current supporters and potential donors?  Once you have zeroed in on the target audience, work out when they will be online for the best chance of your tweet being seen by them.  Use analytic tools available in Twitter or another app to confirm the optimum time through test tweets.  Content calendar  Trying to come up with new ideas every morning is stressful and the quality of the content does suffer.  Stop right now! Instead take time to construct a media calendar, populated with your organisation's events, campaigns, key occasions in your sector and external diary dates. Breaking news can be posted around these diaried events - instant inspiration and you will never forget to tweet about an important date ever again.  Curate rather create  It is hugely time-consuming to create enough original matter to populate a Twitter feed. The message becomes monotonous if your audience is only ever hearing one voice. So, to kill two birds with one stone follow the rule of thirds. For every original tweet, retweet another account and reply to someone else.  Using the quote retweet function allows you another 140 words to add a commentary to expand your thoughts on the original tweet.  The rule of thirds provides variety, additional value, encourages engagement as well as positions your organisation as a thought leader in its sector  A word of warning: make sure you only direct retweet trustworthy sources and read or watch links in their entirety to avoid any unpleasant surprises.  Time-saving tools  Don't get caught in the cycle of having to post tweets 'live'. Set aside some time to schedule a number of tweets in advance using tools such as Buffer or Hootsuite. It an especially efficient way to deal with diaried events from your content calendar.  In the same vein, Hootlet is a free browser plugin which allows you to immediately add shortened page URL and a message with the link's title to your Hootsuite schedule without having to open Hootsuite and copy the link across – great for quick curated content. Grace Dyke is Strategic Director at PR and Communications social enterprise, Yellow Jigsaw. The Yellow Jigsaw team manage PR and fundraising campaigns for regional and national charities, as well as managing the North West's only dedicated skills and support network for charities and social enterprises, the Big Heart Network.  Big Heart Network puts its heart and soul into helping charities and social enterprises. Contact us on hello@yellowjigsaw.co.uk and visit our page to see when the next lunch and learn social media sessions will be held. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero: The half way leaders are... Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times      
    Apr 19, 2017 1682
  • 19 Apr 2017
    We’ve reached the half way point of Local Hero 2017. Francesca and Rachel, who are raising funds for Friends of Hillside School, have stretched their lead to 16 points raising £1875 in the process  – a strong but by no means unassailable lead. Meanwhile, the chasing pack is becoming increasingly concertinaed. Just 15 points (donations) currently separate 7th to 20th place. Each week we are inspired by the creativity and energy put in by our Local Heroes. This week is no exception. Here are some of our highlights from week 3: Fundraising is an art! Charlotte Clark is creating a bespoke piece of wall art to be exhibited as a permanent fixture in the Clifton Community Arts Centre. She will be incorporating the artwork of local community groups such as schools and charities.  Knit you usual challenge Avid knitters from the "Made to give......with love" group in Plymouth  are  getting sponsored to knit links. These links will be built into a chain which will be measured in September.  All funds go to Jeremiah's Journey. Digital detox  These days detoxes take all types  - for Anoushka Yeoh and friends going without screens for a day is the hardest challenge of all!  Tour de France Force After conquering Kilimanjaro in 2017, Lynda Dean and the wider Sporting Family Change Team are at it again – this time cycling mighty 240 Miles from Bath to Paris!  “…Even if we’re just dancing in the dark…” Julia Fletcher is hosting on an energetic night of glow sticks and Lycra for Basingstoke group,  Helping Hands for the Blind. Fundraising from 10,000 feet above! 6 brave souls will be jumping out of a plane in a tandem skydive for Oxford Cruse, which provides free bereavement support and counselling to people in Oxfordshire. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1272 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’ve reached the half way point of Local Hero 2017. Francesca and Rachel, who are raising funds for Friends of Hillside School, have stretched their lead to 16 points raising £1875 in the process  – a strong but by no means unassailable lead. Meanwhile, the chasing pack is becoming increasingly concertinaed. Just 15 points (donations) currently separate 7th to 20th place. Each week we are inspired by the creativity and energy put in by our Local Heroes. This week is no exception. Here are some of our highlights from week 3: Fundraising is an art! Charlotte Clark is creating a bespoke piece of wall art to be exhibited as a permanent fixture in the Clifton Community Arts Centre. She will be incorporating the artwork of local community groups such as schools and charities.  Knit you usual challenge Avid knitters from the "Made to give......with love" group in Plymouth  are  getting sponsored to knit links. These links will be built into a chain which will be measured in September.  All funds go to Jeremiah's Journey. Digital detox  These days detoxes take all types  - for Anoushka Yeoh and friends going without screens for a day is the hardest challenge of all!  Tour de France Force After conquering Kilimanjaro in 2017, Lynda Dean and the wider Sporting Family Change Team are at it again – this time cycling mighty 240 Miles from Bath to Paris!  “…Even if we’re just dancing in the dark…” Julia Fletcher is hosting on an energetic night of glow sticks and Lycra for Basingstoke group,  Helping Hands for the Blind. Fundraising from 10,000 feet above! 6 brave souls will be jumping out of a plane in a tandem skydive for Oxford Cruse, which provides free bereavement support and counselling to people in Oxfordshire. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 19, 2017 1272
  • 12 Apr 2017
    At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    1207 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    Apr 12, 2017 1207
  • 06 Apr 2017
    Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager the Archway Project, explains how they use digital tools to support their fundraising activities. What is the Archway Project? The Archway Project will transform the learning facilities at the Roman Baths. It consists of three elements: A new learning centre that includes a pioneering Investigation Zone set among in-situ Roman remains A new World Heritage Centre for Bath that will enthuse everyone to explore our special city An extension to the Roman Baths - currently, a sauna (called a laconicum) is hidden behind two non-descript wooden doors. These doors will disappear, and visitors to the Baths will be able to enjoy it. These will open in 2019.   Why is the Archway Project important? The learning facilities at the Roman Baths are over-subscribed and inadequate for the needs of 21st century learners. There is also nowhere for people to learn about why Bath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Finally, some of the Roman archaeology and collections are under threat if they are not cared for. The Archway Project will address all these needs simultaneously. What is the sponsor a tile appeal? Donors can leave their own individual mark and message of support on a virtual tile. The marks are inspired by our collection of Roman ceramic building materials – box tiles and bricks. The box tiles were used to construct the Great Bath’s roof. Builders marked the surface of the actual tiles with wooden combs, to help the mortar stick. One of the bricks in our collection, similar to those that feature in the laconicum floor, features a dog’s paw print. Who is leading the appeal? The Roman Baths Foundation is an independent charity, whose purpose is to support learning and conservation at the Roman Baths through fundraising and advocacy. Fundraising for the Archway Project is its first task. Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, is leading the fundraising drive for the Archway Project. Rebecca says: “Sponsor a tile is the first time the Foundation has used a digital platform to raise funds. Local Giving and platform developers Considered Creative worked closely together to help us create it. We wanted something dynamic that would appeal to local residents. With Local Giving’s and Considered Creative’s support, we have achieved that. Now we are working on promoting it.” How do I sponsor a tile? Sponsoring a tile is easy and low-cost. You can sponsor a tile here from £5. How do I find out more about the Archway Project? There is lots of information about the project on the Roman Baths website or you can contact Rebecca directly at archway@bathnes.gov.uk Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero 2017: Let the Race Begin  How to be a better donor in one easy step Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society Image:  Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, standing next to the Laconicum, which will be open to the public in 2019.
    849 Posted by Rebecca Gibson
  • Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager the Archway Project, explains how they use digital tools to support their fundraising activities. What is the Archway Project? The Archway Project will transform the learning facilities at the Roman Baths. It consists of three elements: A new learning centre that includes a pioneering Investigation Zone set among in-situ Roman remains A new World Heritage Centre for Bath that will enthuse everyone to explore our special city An extension to the Roman Baths - currently, a sauna (called a laconicum) is hidden behind two non-descript wooden doors. These doors will disappear, and visitors to the Baths will be able to enjoy it. These will open in 2019.   Why is the Archway Project important? The learning facilities at the Roman Baths are over-subscribed and inadequate for the needs of 21st century learners. There is also nowhere for people to learn about why Bath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Finally, some of the Roman archaeology and collections are under threat if they are not cared for. The Archway Project will address all these needs simultaneously. What is the sponsor a tile appeal? Donors can leave their own individual mark and message of support on a virtual tile. The marks are inspired by our collection of Roman ceramic building materials – box tiles and bricks. The box tiles were used to construct the Great Bath’s roof. Builders marked the surface of the actual tiles with wooden combs, to help the mortar stick. One of the bricks in our collection, similar to those that feature in the laconicum floor, features a dog’s paw print. Who is leading the appeal? The Roman Baths Foundation is an independent charity, whose purpose is to support learning and conservation at the Roman Baths through fundraising and advocacy. Fundraising for the Archway Project is its first task. Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, is leading the fundraising drive for the Archway Project. Rebecca says: “Sponsor a tile is the first time the Foundation has used a digital platform to raise funds. Local Giving and platform developers Considered Creative worked closely together to help us create it. We wanted something dynamic that would appeal to local residents. With Local Giving’s and Considered Creative’s support, we have achieved that. Now we are working on promoting it.” How do I sponsor a tile? Sponsoring a tile is easy and low-cost. You can sponsor a tile here from £5. How do I find out more about the Archway Project? There is lots of information about the project on the Roman Baths website or you can contact Rebecca directly at archway@bathnes.gov.uk Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero 2017: Let the Race Begin  How to be a better donor in one easy step Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society Image:  Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, standing next to the Laconicum, which will be open to the public in 2019.
    Apr 06, 2017 849
  • 03 Apr 2017
    We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1765 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 03, 2017 1765
  • 03 Apr 2017
    It’s easy to be a better donor. All you need to do is ask for your donation to be used for core costs. Why 'core costs'? 1) Because if you ask any charity* what they need and what they find hardest to fund, they will always reply “core costs”. Take this diagram from the recent State of the VCSE Sector in Somerset report which shows the responses to the question ”what three areas do you find it hardest to raise funds for?” If you trust the charity to deliver positive social change, then why not trust them to know what they need to spend your money on. 2) The clue is in the name ‘core’. These are all the things at the heart of a charity that they need to pay for before they can do any good. They are often not very interesting: electricity bills, auditor fees, rent, IT support contracts. The largest cost is usually staff wages – vital if you want to build trusting relationships with the most vulnerable people in society. Staff salaries, including for senior managers and CEOs, are not a ‘nice to have’ – they are fundamental. A charity cannot commit to supporting a care leaver for the next few years as they transition into adulthood, if they don’t think their team or even their organisation will still be around to see this through. Neither can they commit to providing vital community transport or counselling for someone with a life limiting condition or being there for people in recovery from mental ill health. They need a solid core to offer consistent and long-term support. And surely that long-term help is what any donors wants to support? 3) Charities are experiencing many demands – loss of statutory funding, increased demands for services, changes in technology. They need to adapt – to work with others, to deliver services in new ways, to grow or develop. If their core is wobbly then it is hard to find the time, the headspace, the resources needed to make good decisions about how best to change. There is a need to invest in the core of any charity to ensure it continues to focus on delivering relevant, quality services – and if it is looking to grow then, of course, the core needs to grow too. Source: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/08/16/graphic-re-visioning-nonprofit-overhead/ 4) And finally, as a donor giving core funding, you can feel reassured that you have done the most good you can with your donation. You will have demonstrated your trust in your chosen charity, your commitment to their future and your understanding of what they need. I have no doubt that you will receive heartfelt thanks. * I am using ‘charity’ to mean any social purpose organisations including voluntary groups, community interest companies and social enterprises. Emma Beeston advises philanthropists and grant makers on how best to direct their money to the causes they care about. Support includes strategy and programme design, scoping studies, assessments and monitoring visits. www.emmabeeston.co.uk; emma@emmabeeston.co.uk; @emmabeeston01  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    2444 Posted by Emma Beeston
  • It’s easy to be a better donor. All you need to do is ask for your donation to be used for core costs. Why 'core costs'? 1) Because if you ask any charity* what they need and what they find hardest to fund, they will always reply “core costs”. Take this diagram from the recent State of the VCSE Sector in Somerset report which shows the responses to the question ”what three areas do you find it hardest to raise funds for?” If you trust the charity to deliver positive social change, then why not trust them to know what they need to spend your money on. 2) The clue is in the name ‘core’. These are all the things at the heart of a charity that they need to pay for before they can do any good. They are often not very interesting: electricity bills, auditor fees, rent, IT support contracts. The largest cost is usually staff wages – vital if you want to build trusting relationships with the most vulnerable people in society. Staff salaries, including for senior managers and CEOs, are not a ‘nice to have’ – they are fundamental. A charity cannot commit to supporting a care leaver for the next few years as they transition into adulthood, if they don’t think their team or even their organisation will still be around to see this through. Neither can they commit to providing vital community transport or counselling for someone with a life limiting condition or being there for people in recovery from mental ill health. They need a solid core to offer consistent and long-term support. And surely that long-term help is what any donors wants to support? 3) Charities are experiencing many demands – loss of statutory funding, increased demands for services, changes in technology. They need to adapt – to work with others, to deliver services in new ways, to grow or develop. If their core is wobbly then it is hard to find the time, the headspace, the resources needed to make good decisions about how best to change. There is a need to invest in the core of any charity to ensure it continues to focus on delivering relevant, quality services – and if it is looking to grow then, of course, the core needs to grow too. Source: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/08/16/graphic-re-visioning-nonprofit-overhead/ 4) And finally, as a donor giving core funding, you can feel reassured that you have done the most good you can with your donation. You will have demonstrated your trust in your chosen charity, your commitment to their future and your understanding of what they need. I have no doubt that you will receive heartfelt thanks. * I am using ‘charity’ to mean any social purpose organisations including voluntary groups, community interest companies and social enterprises. Emma Beeston advises philanthropists and grant makers on how best to direct their money to the causes they care about. Support includes strategy and programme design, scoping studies, assessments and monitoring visits. www.emmabeeston.co.uk; emma@emmabeeston.co.uk; @emmabeeston01  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    Apr 03, 2017 2444
  • 28 Mar 2017
    The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    1449 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    Mar 28, 2017 1449