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270 blogs
  • 19 Apr 2017
    We’ve reached the half way point of Local Hero 2017. Francesca and Rachel, who are raising funds for Friends of Hillside School, have stretched their lead to 16 points raising £1875 in the process  – a strong but by no means unassailable lead. Meanwhile, the chasing pack is becoming increasingly concertinaed. Just 15 points (donations) currently separate 7th to 20th place. Each week we are inspired by the creativity and energy put in by our Local Heroes. This week is no exception. Here are some of our highlights from week 3: Fundraising is an art! Charlotte Clark is creating a bespoke piece of wall art to be exhibited as a permanent fixture in the Clifton Community Arts Centre. She will be incorporating the artwork of local community groups such as schools and charities.  Knit you usual challenge Avid knitters from the "Made to give......with love" group in Plymouth  are  getting sponsored to knit links. These links will be built into a chain which will be measured in September.  All funds go to Jeremiah's Journey. Digital detox  These days detoxes take all types  - for Anoushka Yeoh and friends going without screens for a day is the hardest challenge of all!  Tour de France Force After conquering Kilimanjaro in 2017, Lynda Dean and the wider Sporting Family Change Team are at it again – this time cycling mighty 240 Miles from Bath to Paris!  “…Even if we’re just dancing in the dark…” Julia Fletcher is hosting on an energetic night of glow sticks and Lycra for Basingstoke group,  Helping Hands for the Blind. Fundraising from 10,000 feet above! 6 brave souls will be jumping out of a plane in a tandem skydive for Oxford Cruse, which provides free bereavement support and counselling to people in Oxfordshire. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1475 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’ve reached the half way point of Local Hero 2017. Francesca and Rachel, who are raising funds for Friends of Hillside School, have stretched their lead to 16 points raising £1875 in the process  – a strong but by no means unassailable lead. Meanwhile, the chasing pack is becoming increasingly concertinaed. Just 15 points (donations) currently separate 7th to 20th place. Each week we are inspired by the creativity and energy put in by our Local Heroes. This week is no exception. Here are some of our highlights from week 3: Fundraising is an art! Charlotte Clark is creating a bespoke piece of wall art to be exhibited as a permanent fixture in the Clifton Community Arts Centre. She will be incorporating the artwork of local community groups such as schools and charities.  Knit you usual challenge Avid knitters from the "Made to give......with love" group in Plymouth  are  getting sponsored to knit links. These links will be built into a chain which will be measured in September.  All funds go to Jeremiah's Journey. Digital detox  These days detoxes take all types  - for Anoushka Yeoh and friends going without screens for a day is the hardest challenge of all!  Tour de France Force After conquering Kilimanjaro in 2017, Lynda Dean and the wider Sporting Family Change Team are at it again – this time cycling mighty 240 Miles from Bath to Paris!  “…Even if we’re just dancing in the dark…” Julia Fletcher is hosting on an energetic night of glow sticks and Lycra for Basingstoke group,  Helping Hands for the Blind. Fundraising from 10,000 feet above! 6 brave souls will be jumping out of a plane in a tandem skydive for Oxford Cruse, which provides free bereavement support and counselling to people in Oxfordshire. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 19, 2017 1475
  • 12 Apr 2017
    At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    1501 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    Apr 12, 2017 1501
  • 06 Apr 2017
    Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager the Archway Project, explains how they use digital tools to support their fundraising activities. What is the Archway Project? The Archway Project will transform the learning facilities at the Roman Baths. It consists of three elements: A new learning centre that includes a pioneering Investigation Zone set among in-situ Roman remains A new World Heritage Centre for Bath that will enthuse everyone to explore our special city An extension to the Roman Baths - currently, a sauna (called a laconicum) is hidden behind two non-descript wooden doors. These doors will disappear, and visitors to the Baths will be able to enjoy it. These will open in 2019.   Why is the Archway Project important? The learning facilities at the Roman Baths are over-subscribed and inadequate for the needs of 21st century learners. There is also nowhere for people to learn about why Bath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Finally, some of the Roman archaeology and collections are under threat if they are not cared for. The Archway Project will address all these needs simultaneously. What is the sponsor a tile appeal? Donors can leave their own individual mark and message of support on a virtual tile. The marks are inspired by our collection of Roman ceramic building materials – box tiles and bricks. The box tiles were used to construct the Great Bath’s roof. Builders marked the surface of the actual tiles with wooden combs, to help the mortar stick. One of the bricks in our collection, similar to those that feature in the laconicum floor, features a dog’s paw print. Who is leading the appeal? The Roman Baths Foundation is an independent charity, whose purpose is to support learning and conservation at the Roman Baths through fundraising and advocacy. Fundraising for the Archway Project is its first task. Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, is leading the fundraising drive for the Archway Project. Rebecca says: “Sponsor a tile is the first time the Foundation has used a digital platform to raise funds. Local Giving and platform developers Considered Creative worked closely together to help us create it. We wanted something dynamic that would appeal to local residents. With Local Giving’s and Considered Creative’s support, we have achieved that. Now we are working on promoting it.” How do I sponsor a tile? Sponsoring a tile is easy and low-cost. You can sponsor a tile here from £5. How do I find out more about the Archway Project? There is lots of information about the project on the Roman Baths website or you can contact Rebecca directly at archway@bathnes.gov.uk Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero 2017: Let the Race Begin  How to be a better donor in one easy step Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society Image:  Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, standing next to the Laconicum, which will be open to the public in 2019.
    987 Posted by Rebecca Gibson
  • Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager the Archway Project, explains how they use digital tools to support their fundraising activities. What is the Archway Project? The Archway Project will transform the learning facilities at the Roman Baths. It consists of three elements: A new learning centre that includes a pioneering Investigation Zone set among in-situ Roman remains A new World Heritage Centre for Bath that will enthuse everyone to explore our special city An extension to the Roman Baths - currently, a sauna (called a laconicum) is hidden behind two non-descript wooden doors. These doors will disappear, and visitors to the Baths will be able to enjoy it. These will open in 2019.   Why is the Archway Project important? The learning facilities at the Roman Baths are over-subscribed and inadequate for the needs of 21st century learners. There is also nowhere for people to learn about why Bath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Finally, some of the Roman archaeology and collections are under threat if they are not cared for. The Archway Project will address all these needs simultaneously. What is the sponsor a tile appeal? Donors can leave their own individual mark and message of support on a virtual tile. The marks are inspired by our collection of Roman ceramic building materials – box tiles and bricks. The box tiles were used to construct the Great Bath’s roof. Builders marked the surface of the actual tiles with wooden combs, to help the mortar stick. One of the bricks in our collection, similar to those that feature in the laconicum floor, features a dog’s paw print. Who is leading the appeal? The Roman Baths Foundation is an independent charity, whose purpose is to support learning and conservation at the Roman Baths through fundraising and advocacy. Fundraising for the Archway Project is its first task. Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, is leading the fundraising drive for the Archway Project. Rebecca says: “Sponsor a tile is the first time the Foundation has used a digital platform to raise funds. Local Giving and platform developers Considered Creative worked closely together to help us create it. We wanted something dynamic that would appeal to local residents. With Local Giving’s and Considered Creative’s support, we have achieved that. Now we are working on promoting it.” How do I sponsor a tile? Sponsoring a tile is easy and low-cost. You can sponsor a tile here from £5. How do I find out more about the Archway Project? There is lots of information about the project on the Roman Baths website or you can contact Rebecca directly at archway@bathnes.gov.uk Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero 2017: Let the Race Begin  How to be a better donor in one easy step Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society Image:  Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, standing next to the Laconicum, which will be open to the public in 2019.
    Apr 06, 2017 987
  • 03 Apr 2017
    We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1834 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 03, 2017 1834
  • 03 Apr 2017
    It’s easy to be a better donor. All you need to do is ask for your donation to be used for core costs. Why 'core costs'? 1) Because if you ask any charity* what they need and what they find hardest to fund, they will always reply “core costs”. Take this diagram from the recent State of the VCSE Sector in Somerset report which shows the responses to the question ”what three areas do you find it hardest to raise funds for?” If you trust the charity to deliver positive social change, then why not trust them to know what they need to spend your money on. 2) The clue is in the name ‘core’. These are all the things at the heart of a charity that they need to pay for before they can do any good. They are often not very interesting: electricity bills, auditor fees, rent, IT support contracts. The largest cost is usually staff wages – vital if you want to build trusting relationships with the most vulnerable people in society. Staff salaries, including for senior managers and CEOs, are not a ‘nice to have’ – they are fundamental. A charity cannot commit to supporting a care leaver for the next few years as they transition into adulthood, if they don’t think their team or even their organisation will still be around to see this through. Neither can they commit to providing vital community transport or counselling for someone with a life limiting condition or being there for people in recovery from mental ill health. They need a solid core to offer consistent and long-term support. And surely that long-term help is what any donors wants to support? 3) Charities are experiencing many demands – loss of statutory funding, increased demands for services, changes in technology. They need to adapt – to work with others, to deliver services in new ways, to grow or develop. If their core is wobbly then it is hard to find the time, the headspace, the resources needed to make good decisions about how best to change. There is a need to invest in the core of any charity to ensure it continues to focus on delivering relevant, quality services – and if it is looking to grow then, of course, the core needs to grow too. Source: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/08/16/graphic-re-visioning-nonprofit-overhead/ 4) And finally, as a donor giving core funding, you can feel reassured that you have done the most good you can with your donation. You will have demonstrated your trust in your chosen charity, your commitment to their future and your understanding of what they need. I have no doubt that you will receive heartfelt thanks. * I am using ‘charity’ to mean any social purpose organisations including voluntary groups, community interest companies and social enterprises. Emma Beeston advises philanthropists and grant makers on how best to direct their money to the causes they care about. Support includes strategy and programme design, scoping studies, assessments and monitoring visits. www.emmabeeston.co.uk; emma@emmabeeston.co.uk; @emmabeeston01  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    2630 Posted by Emma Beeston
  • It’s easy to be a better donor. All you need to do is ask for your donation to be used for core costs. Why 'core costs'? 1) Because if you ask any charity* what they need and what they find hardest to fund, they will always reply “core costs”. Take this diagram from the recent State of the VCSE Sector in Somerset report which shows the responses to the question ”what three areas do you find it hardest to raise funds for?” If you trust the charity to deliver positive social change, then why not trust them to know what they need to spend your money on. 2) The clue is in the name ‘core’. These are all the things at the heart of a charity that they need to pay for before they can do any good. They are often not very interesting: electricity bills, auditor fees, rent, IT support contracts. The largest cost is usually staff wages – vital if you want to build trusting relationships with the most vulnerable people in society. Staff salaries, including for senior managers and CEOs, are not a ‘nice to have’ – they are fundamental. A charity cannot commit to supporting a care leaver for the next few years as they transition into adulthood, if they don’t think their team or even their organisation will still be around to see this through. Neither can they commit to providing vital community transport or counselling for someone with a life limiting condition or being there for people in recovery from mental ill health. They need a solid core to offer consistent and long-term support. And surely that long-term help is what any donors wants to support? 3) Charities are experiencing many demands – loss of statutory funding, increased demands for services, changes in technology. They need to adapt – to work with others, to deliver services in new ways, to grow or develop. If their core is wobbly then it is hard to find the time, the headspace, the resources needed to make good decisions about how best to change. There is a need to invest in the core of any charity to ensure it continues to focus on delivering relevant, quality services – and if it is looking to grow then, of course, the core needs to grow too. Source: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/08/16/graphic-re-visioning-nonprofit-overhead/ 4) And finally, as a donor giving core funding, you can feel reassured that you have done the most good you can with your donation. You will have demonstrated your trust in your chosen charity, your commitment to their future and your understanding of what they need. I have no doubt that you will receive heartfelt thanks. * I am using ‘charity’ to mean any social purpose organisations including voluntary groups, community interest companies and social enterprises. Emma Beeston advises philanthropists and grant makers on how best to direct their money to the causes they care about. Support includes strategy and programme design, scoping studies, assessments and monitoring visits. www.emmabeeston.co.uk; emma@emmabeeston.co.uk; @emmabeeston01  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    Apr 03, 2017 2630
  • 28 Mar 2017
    The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    1636 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    Mar 28, 2017 1636
  • 15 Mar 2017
    Insurance is a key part of the risk management process for charities and community groups. It’s vital that non-profit groups that do so much good, with so few resources, are protected. And insurance can provide that protection. With the financial security of insurance, your organisation can focus all its resources on its charitable aims! Let’s start with the basics; what’s required by law? Employers liability is a legal requirement if you have any employees. £5 million indemnity is required, but £10m is now standard. Some charity insurance policies will also cover your volunteers as if they were employees under Employers Liability insurance rather than third parties covered by your Public Liability policy. This gives them better cover. Also, if you own and operate motor vehicles, you’re legally required to appropriately insure them. Read more about whether your organisation legally needs insurance. Is it important to be insured beyond the legal requirements? Yes! The primary function of insurance is protecting your organisation from the financial burden of claims and protecting your assets in the event of claims. Should you be unfortunate enough to have a member of the public slip on your premises, despite your best risk management efforts, you may be liable for a large claim – this is the sort of claim that could shut down your organisation and put a stop to all the good that you have been doing. What could happen if we’re not insured? This depends on your charity or community group structure. However, if you’re not a registered charity and someone has cause to make a claim against you, it is possible that they will take you to court. If you lose the court battle, then you are personally liable for the entire claim amount. Equally, even if you are a registered charity, a claimant may choose to take the charity to court and, in some circumstances, pursue compensation from the trustees. Whatever the situation, in the event of a claim, if you don’t have insurance then your charity and community group is at serious risk of financial ruin. And there’s potentially a significant risk to the board of trustees too. What should we do about insurance? The first step towards insuring your organisation should be discussing your requirements with charity insurance specialists. There are specialist charity insurance providers and brokers that can assist you with your insurance requirements and risk management. What insurance should we consider buying? Beyond the legal requirements of Employers Liability and Motor (if you operate vehicles), you may consider a range of insurance product. Common cover required by charities and community groups include Public Liability, Property, Trustee Indemnity, Professional Indemnity, Fidelity and more. Tell us about the common insurance covers for charities and community groups. Public Liability protects you from claims made by members of the public who have suffered personal injury or property damage because of your charity or community group. Property Damage insures your building, contents and assets against loss, theft or damage and is key to risk management. Trustee Indemnity protects your board of trustees from claims made against them or the organisation. This will help your trustees sleep well at night and can help you recruit top quality trustees. Professional Indemnity protects you if you provide any professional, advice or counselling services or similar. And Fidelity cover insures you against theft or fraud by an employee, volunteer or trustee.  Elaine Denny has been working in the Charity Insurance sector for 10 years and supports all of CaSE Insurance’s charity clients. You can contact Elaine on 01372 227 634 or by email, at elainedenny@caseinsurance.co.uk. CaSE Insurance was established and is part-owned by the charity law firm Bates Wells Braithwaite and by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO). CaSE represents a unique partnership between charity and insurance specialists. You can find out more about CaSE at www.caseinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0333 800 9838. CaSE Insurance is proud to offer free and impartial risk management and insurance advice to Localgiving members. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity Video How Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs
    2030 Posted by Elaine Denny
  • Insurance is a key part of the risk management process for charities and community groups. It’s vital that non-profit groups that do so much good, with so few resources, are protected. And insurance can provide that protection. With the financial security of insurance, your organisation can focus all its resources on its charitable aims! Let’s start with the basics; what’s required by law? Employers liability is a legal requirement if you have any employees. £5 million indemnity is required, but £10m is now standard. Some charity insurance policies will also cover your volunteers as if they were employees under Employers Liability insurance rather than third parties covered by your Public Liability policy. This gives them better cover. Also, if you own and operate motor vehicles, you’re legally required to appropriately insure them. Read more about whether your organisation legally needs insurance. Is it important to be insured beyond the legal requirements? Yes! The primary function of insurance is protecting your organisation from the financial burden of claims and protecting your assets in the event of claims. Should you be unfortunate enough to have a member of the public slip on your premises, despite your best risk management efforts, you may be liable for a large claim – this is the sort of claim that could shut down your organisation and put a stop to all the good that you have been doing. What could happen if we’re not insured? This depends on your charity or community group structure. However, if you’re not a registered charity and someone has cause to make a claim against you, it is possible that they will take you to court. If you lose the court battle, then you are personally liable for the entire claim amount. Equally, even if you are a registered charity, a claimant may choose to take the charity to court and, in some circumstances, pursue compensation from the trustees. Whatever the situation, in the event of a claim, if you don’t have insurance then your charity and community group is at serious risk of financial ruin. And there’s potentially a significant risk to the board of trustees too. What should we do about insurance? The first step towards insuring your organisation should be discussing your requirements with charity insurance specialists. There are specialist charity insurance providers and brokers that can assist you with your insurance requirements and risk management. What insurance should we consider buying? Beyond the legal requirements of Employers Liability and Motor (if you operate vehicles), you may consider a range of insurance product. Common cover required by charities and community groups include Public Liability, Property, Trustee Indemnity, Professional Indemnity, Fidelity and more. Tell us about the common insurance covers for charities and community groups. Public Liability protects you from claims made by members of the public who have suffered personal injury or property damage because of your charity or community group. Property Damage insures your building, contents and assets against loss, theft or damage and is key to risk management. Trustee Indemnity protects your board of trustees from claims made against them or the organisation. This will help your trustees sleep well at night and can help you recruit top quality trustees. Professional Indemnity protects you if you provide any professional, advice or counselling services or similar. And Fidelity cover insures you against theft or fraud by an employee, volunteer or trustee.  Elaine Denny has been working in the Charity Insurance sector for 10 years and supports all of CaSE Insurance’s charity clients. You can contact Elaine on 01372 227 634 or by email, at elainedenny@caseinsurance.co.uk. CaSE Insurance was established and is part-owned by the charity law firm Bates Wells Braithwaite and by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO). CaSE represents a unique partnership between charity and insurance specialists. You can find out more about CaSE at www.caseinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0333 800 9838. CaSE Insurance is proud to offer free and impartial risk management and insurance advice to Localgiving members. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity Video How Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs
    Mar 15, 2017 2030
  • 13 Mar 2017
    You're a proud fundraiser for a local charity and you enjoy what you do. But whether you like it or not, you're still tasked with the ever growing problem of getting money in and often it can feel like a losing battle. People just don't get what you do and you find it difficult to explain it in a way that appeals to potential supporters. You don't know where to start.   Why are you struggling? Maybe you feel your charity is different from the rest, you're not trying to raise money for a 'sexy' cause and find it hard to talk about making a difference.   In my previous role as a Grants Officer I often found charities were far too reserved in speaking out about what they did and more importantly the people they helped! But this is key to raising money. Case studies, quotes and photos all help to illustrate the positive impact your charity is making.    To be able to show the impact that you are making it is important to focus on the outcomes that funding would bring rather than the outputs.   Example: A Dial a Ride charity needs to raise money to pay volunteer driver expenses each month. The charity struggles to raise money and feels it's just not sexy enough to appeal to donors. When fundraising it often focuses on how funding would cover the cost of fuel to get people from A to B each week.  Sadly the charity has failed to look at the bigger picture and could potentially miss out on funding. It has focused on an outputs of its work rather than the outcomes and what it could achieve if it raises the money.   If your charity is in a similar situation and snuggles to talk about impact and outcomes think about:   1. What would happen to beneficiaries if they weren't able to use your service?   2. Why do people need your service, what situations are they in?   3. Do you have any case studies to highlight the difference you are making?   4. What impact does your work have on those that volunteer? Why do they volunteer?    Going back to the example of the Dial a Ride service, what it failed to realise was the positive difference it was having on the lives of not only the people that used the service but the volunteer drivers too! Many of the drivers were retired and chose to volunteer regular time each week to give them something constructive to do, a purpose. Something to get up for in the mornings. They enjoyed the camaraderie between one another and the contact they had with the local community. They felt as though they were doing their bit to give something back.   Furthermore the people that were using the service often called it a 'life line' and without it they said their lives would be very different. Many users suffered from rural isolation and so often felt trapped in their own homes, due to old age and disability.    When you next come to fundraise for your cause, whether it's online or through a grant application, use the questions above to help tell your story. Include as much detail as possible to make sure your voice is heard and let people know the great work that you are doing every day.    For inspiration check out these great fundraising pages on our site: Park in the Past  The Josephine and Jack Project Street Talk     Good luck with your fundraising!     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Wise Words from Alistair Sill: Local Hero Champion 2016                 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times   Image courtesy of 
    2196 Posted by Emma Rawlingson
  • You're a proud fundraiser for a local charity and you enjoy what you do. But whether you like it or not, you're still tasked with the ever growing problem of getting money in and often it can feel like a losing battle. People just don't get what you do and you find it difficult to explain it in a way that appeals to potential supporters. You don't know where to start.   Why are you struggling? Maybe you feel your charity is different from the rest, you're not trying to raise money for a 'sexy' cause and find it hard to talk about making a difference.   In my previous role as a Grants Officer I often found charities were far too reserved in speaking out about what they did and more importantly the people they helped! But this is key to raising money. Case studies, quotes and photos all help to illustrate the positive impact your charity is making.    To be able to show the impact that you are making it is important to focus on the outcomes that funding would bring rather than the outputs.   Example: A Dial a Ride charity needs to raise money to pay volunteer driver expenses each month. The charity struggles to raise money and feels it's just not sexy enough to appeal to donors. When fundraising it often focuses on how funding would cover the cost of fuel to get people from A to B each week.  Sadly the charity has failed to look at the bigger picture and could potentially miss out on funding. It has focused on an outputs of its work rather than the outcomes and what it could achieve if it raises the money.   If your charity is in a similar situation and snuggles to talk about impact and outcomes think about:   1. What would happen to beneficiaries if they weren't able to use your service?   2. Why do people need your service, what situations are they in?   3. Do you have any case studies to highlight the difference you are making?   4. What impact does your work have on those that volunteer? Why do they volunteer?    Going back to the example of the Dial a Ride service, what it failed to realise was the positive difference it was having on the lives of not only the people that used the service but the volunteer drivers too! Many of the drivers were retired and chose to volunteer regular time each week to give them something constructive to do, a purpose. Something to get up for in the mornings. They enjoyed the camaraderie between one another and the contact they had with the local community. They felt as though they were doing their bit to give something back.   Furthermore the people that were using the service often called it a 'life line' and without it they said their lives would be very different. Many users suffered from rural isolation and so often felt trapped in their own homes, due to old age and disability.    When you next come to fundraise for your cause, whether it's online or through a grant application, use the questions above to help tell your story. Include as much detail as possible to make sure your voice is heard and let people know the great work that you are doing every day.    For inspiration check out these great fundraising pages on our site: Park in the Past  The Josephine and Jack Project Street Talk     Good luck with your fundraising!     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Wise Words from Alistair Sill: Local Hero Champion 2016                 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times   Image courtesy of 
    Mar 13, 2017 2196
  • 09 Mar 2017
    Chief Constable for North Yorkshire Police, Dave Jones, explains how the Police Property Fund turns unreturnable stolen or recovered goods into grants for local community groups. Mountain bikes, perfume and jewellery; tools, TVs and tablets. You’d be surprised at the range and volume of stolen, confiscated and found items that find a temporary home in our police stations.  In an ideal world, these goods would all be reunited with their rightful owners. However, there are many items which haven’t been property-marked and which aren’t particularly distinctive in their nature – which makes them practically impossible to return. Due to the large volumes of items being seized and recovered, it’s impractical for us to keep them for any great length of time, so the vast majority are sold to the public via online auctions, raising money in the process.  This money forms the “pot” for the North Yorkshire Police Property Fund.   How the North Yorkshire Police Property Fund works The idea of the Fund is simple.  Twice a year, we open funding rounds where local community and voluntary organisations of all sizes and types can apply for money to support initiatives of benefit to North Yorkshire and its residents.    To be considered for a grant, a project needs to meet certain criteria.  For example, it should involve children and young people in extra-curricular activities, or help to increase safety, reduce the fear of crime or anti-social behaviour, or bring different parts of the community together.  It’s also important that organisations applying for a grant from the Police Property Fund encourage equality of opportunity, promote good community relations, and demonstrate that they can tackle any barriers that may prevent disabled people using their services. At the end of the application period, the Police and Crime Commissioner and I judge all the entries, and decide where to award a grant.  We receive some great ideas, and although it takes a lot of time to consider each application fully, it is a task that we both enjoy – especially when we come across a really good project that will make a positive impact in the local community. The Police Property Fund has been a real success, and continues to grow in popularity each year. Over the past five years more than £120,000 has been distributed to projects throughout the North Yorkshire region, helping to bring our community together and tackle many equality barriers. Success Stories Looking at some successful examples from our last round of funding paints a strong picture of the positive effect that even relatively small amounts of cash can have. For example, the Yellow Ribbonand White Rabbit pre-schools based at Catterick Garrison and Claro Barracks, Ripon were successful in a grant application of over £1200 to provide books, puzzles, dolls, play food and posters to help young children – often from as far away as Fiji and Nepal – to understand British values and learn to respect different cultures and beliefs.  Another project – one which is close to my heart in my role as the national police lead for rural and wildlife crime – will see children in our region enjoying a special conservation experience on the North York Moors.  We gave a £3,000 grant (one of the highest we have awarded) to the British Association for Shooting and Conservation to fund experience days for hundreds of youngsters between the ages of six and 11.  On one of these days, the young people – who may have little direct experience of our local habitat – will visit the grouse moors, help out with conservation tasks and learn about the environment and fascinating wildlife unique to our region. Riding for the Disabled England (RDA) is another successful applicant.  They bid for £750 to help eight disabled people take part in a week-long residential holiday to learn to drive a pony and carriage, and take part in other sport and arts and craft activities.  The experience is the only one of its type in the UK, and the people who take part gain a lot of self-confidence, so it has a much longer-term impact on their lives. Even just these three projects offer an insight into the valuable work that our many community and voluntary organisations carry out within North Yorkshire, and I am very proud that our Fund has helped to support them.  It feels right that the proceeds from stolen goods are providing a bit of extra support to community ventures, rather than lining criminals’ pockets.  Entry is now open for the latest round of Police Property Fund grants.  The Commissioner and I have already put a date in our diaries to judge the applications, and we’re really looking forward to supporting another set of excellent initiatives this year.  So, if you are part of a community group in North Yorkshire, and have a project that would fit our funding criteria, please remember to get your application in before the closing date on 30 April.  You’ll find all the details at  www.northyorkshire.police.uk/grant. Good luck!   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times How Charities can tap into the hyperlocal  4 Steps to the perfect charity Video How Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment  
    1943 Posted by Dave Jones
  • Chief Constable for North Yorkshire Police, Dave Jones, explains how the Police Property Fund turns unreturnable stolen or recovered goods into grants for local community groups. Mountain bikes, perfume and jewellery; tools, TVs and tablets. You’d be surprised at the range and volume of stolen, confiscated and found items that find a temporary home in our police stations.  In an ideal world, these goods would all be reunited with their rightful owners. However, there are many items which haven’t been property-marked and which aren’t particularly distinctive in their nature – which makes them practically impossible to return. Due to the large volumes of items being seized and recovered, it’s impractical for us to keep them for any great length of time, so the vast majority are sold to the public via online auctions, raising money in the process.  This money forms the “pot” for the North Yorkshire Police Property Fund.   How the North Yorkshire Police Property Fund works The idea of the Fund is simple.  Twice a year, we open funding rounds where local community and voluntary organisations of all sizes and types can apply for money to support initiatives of benefit to North Yorkshire and its residents.    To be considered for a grant, a project needs to meet certain criteria.  For example, it should involve children and young people in extra-curricular activities, or help to increase safety, reduce the fear of crime or anti-social behaviour, or bring different parts of the community together.  It’s also important that organisations applying for a grant from the Police Property Fund encourage equality of opportunity, promote good community relations, and demonstrate that they can tackle any barriers that may prevent disabled people using their services. At the end of the application period, the Police and Crime Commissioner and I judge all the entries, and decide where to award a grant.  We receive some great ideas, and although it takes a lot of time to consider each application fully, it is a task that we both enjoy – especially when we come across a really good project that will make a positive impact in the local community. The Police Property Fund has been a real success, and continues to grow in popularity each year. Over the past five years more than £120,000 has been distributed to projects throughout the North Yorkshire region, helping to bring our community together and tackle many equality barriers. Success Stories Looking at some successful examples from our last round of funding paints a strong picture of the positive effect that even relatively small amounts of cash can have. For example, the Yellow Ribbonand White Rabbit pre-schools based at Catterick Garrison and Claro Barracks, Ripon were successful in a grant application of over £1200 to provide books, puzzles, dolls, play food and posters to help young children – often from as far away as Fiji and Nepal – to understand British values and learn to respect different cultures and beliefs.  Another project – one which is close to my heart in my role as the national police lead for rural and wildlife crime – will see children in our region enjoying a special conservation experience on the North York Moors.  We gave a £3,000 grant (one of the highest we have awarded) to the British Association for Shooting and Conservation to fund experience days for hundreds of youngsters between the ages of six and 11.  On one of these days, the young people – who may have little direct experience of our local habitat – will visit the grouse moors, help out with conservation tasks and learn about the environment and fascinating wildlife unique to our region. Riding for the Disabled England (RDA) is another successful applicant.  They bid for £750 to help eight disabled people take part in a week-long residential holiday to learn to drive a pony and carriage, and take part in other sport and arts and craft activities.  The experience is the only one of its type in the UK, and the people who take part gain a lot of self-confidence, so it has a much longer-term impact on their lives. Even just these three projects offer an insight into the valuable work that our many community and voluntary organisations carry out within North Yorkshire, and I am very proud that our Fund has helped to support them.  It feels right that the proceeds from stolen goods are providing a bit of extra support to community ventures, rather than lining criminals’ pockets.  Entry is now open for the latest round of Police Property Fund grants.  The Commissioner and I have already put a date in our diaries to judge the applications, and we’re really looking forward to supporting another set of excellent initiatives this year.  So, if you are part of a community group in North Yorkshire, and have a project that would fit our funding criteria, please remember to get your application in before the closing date on 30 April.  You’ll find all the details at  www.northyorkshire.police.uk/grant. Good luck!   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times How Charities can tap into the hyperlocal  4 Steps to the perfect charity Video How Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment  
    Mar 09, 2017 1943
  • 06 Mar 2017
    As part of our preparation for Local Hero 2017, I called Nicky Heath, director of the Yeleni Therapy & Support Complementary Health Centre in Herefordshire to ask her about Adam Heaths fundraising challenge last year. Adam had raised funds for them through a simple yet imaginative fundraising campaign. His mantra of "never bringing a moustache to a beard fight’’ paid off as he raised over £1000 by growing his beard out for 12 months and then dying it in a rainbow assortment of colours drawn from the suggestions of his donors! It was a huge success for Yelini and caught our eye here at Localgiving HQ. Nicky was more than happy to share the story with us. Why do you think it's important for charities to engage fundraisers and how do you find fundraisers? What sort of relationship do you have with them? "We have a lot of people that come to our centre. We’re a cancer support charity and what we find is that people who use us support us. (Yelini offer free therapy to people with cancer). A lot of them offer after they have recovered. Their friends and family also often want to raise some money as a thank you for what we’ve done for them". What has been the benefit of engaging fundraisers? Is it just about raising money? Or can they reach out to new donors and also be ambassadors for your group? "It's a combination of things. One of the reasons is obviously that you are trying to raise funds and it's a very competitive market out there at the moment. But also we find that using things like the Localgiving website as a donation collection forum allows us to promote it around social media and give people a focus of where they can donate. It also gives the person doing the fundraising the opportunity to explain how they are doing it and what they are doing it for." "Fundraising is really hand-in-glove with raising community awareness of who you are as an organisation. Especially when it is as fun as what Adam did, it engages people as they find it amusing and think it's really great. It also allowed us to incorporate another local business into the campaign. The local barber shop that he went to get it all done did it all for free because they loved the idea! So it really engaged with them as well. We were also in the local newspapers so it really did help raise awareness in the community. It was such a unique and different thing for somebody to do". Did it take a lot of resource from your organisation to manage the fundraising campaign? "Adam did a lot of it himself and he certainly raised what he wanted to. He set up the Localgiving page under my suggestion. He is actually my son! But he did most of it himself, I didn't hold his hand or anything. All that we had to do off the back of his efforts was try and share it around different forums as much as we could and have posters and things up in the centre. He took the campaign to his workplace which really helped. They were very proactive and actually donated £100 to the campaign. They had to sanction that he could do it in the first place! In the business he is in he does go to meetings and things so they had to agree that it was okay for him to do it". "I feel like Localgiving does give a lot of support to people that are trying to do something like this off of their own volition and we as an organisation tried to offer a level of support as well. I think that's the least you can do if someone's going to put themselves out there in order to raise money for your organisation".  It's a combination of things right? Obviously it is ultimately up to the fundraiser themselves but the more support they can get from us, the platform, and from you guys, the charity, the better right? "Thats right!" So last question, what top tip would you give other Local charities if they were thinking of approaching people to become fundraisers? "Come up with ideas. I think it's quite difficult if you just say "we want you to raise money’’ but you don't have any ideas to get started. Think outside the box a little bit. Everybody knows the usual things like coffee mornings or something like that. That will appeal to a certain sector of society but if you want to make your reach broader I think you need to introduce a variety of different activities and also see where you could perhaps engage other sectors of the community. For example the business world, local shops, people in your local area. Even if it is approaching them to donate a prize or to sponsor and aspect of what you are trying to achieve". "I also think people will be more interested in things that they find interesting, amusing or exciting. I think this engages people more than just standing on the street corner shaking a bucket. People find that quite off putting now actually so you want to try and avoid that really. Think about all the different aspects of who you are trying to engage. You want to especially engage young people because they are the potential future users of your charity (depending on what it is). Don't always pitch it where you think the money is. Often you will find it's the people who have little who give the most". Well that is often true and I think Adam is certainly a brilliant ambassador for the "think outside the box’’ approach to fundraising! Thanks Nicky! Yeleni Therapy & Support Complementary Health Centre are holding a Wellbeing day in collaboration with Kemble at home on Saturday 4th March 10 am til 4pm. All proceeds from the raffle and donations are going to Yeleni. Evi Hudson is also running a fundraising page for Yelini this year. Her ''hair today, gone tomorrow'' campaign is already underway! Help her by making a donation here. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Bright Light Bright Light's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds! Big Strong Hearts: Training Tips for your Charity Challenge
    2062 Posted by Conor Kelly
  • As part of our preparation for Local Hero 2017, I called Nicky Heath, director of the Yeleni Therapy & Support Complementary Health Centre in Herefordshire to ask her about Adam Heaths fundraising challenge last year. Adam had raised funds for them through a simple yet imaginative fundraising campaign. His mantra of "never bringing a moustache to a beard fight’’ paid off as he raised over £1000 by growing his beard out for 12 months and then dying it in a rainbow assortment of colours drawn from the suggestions of his donors! It was a huge success for Yelini and caught our eye here at Localgiving HQ. Nicky was more than happy to share the story with us. Why do you think it's important for charities to engage fundraisers and how do you find fundraisers? What sort of relationship do you have with them? "We have a lot of people that come to our centre. We’re a cancer support charity and what we find is that people who use us support us. (Yelini offer free therapy to people with cancer). A lot of them offer after they have recovered. Their friends and family also often want to raise some money as a thank you for what we’ve done for them". What has been the benefit of engaging fundraisers? Is it just about raising money? Or can they reach out to new donors and also be ambassadors for your group? "It's a combination of things. One of the reasons is obviously that you are trying to raise funds and it's a very competitive market out there at the moment. But also we find that using things like the Localgiving website as a donation collection forum allows us to promote it around social media and give people a focus of where they can donate. It also gives the person doing the fundraising the opportunity to explain how they are doing it and what they are doing it for." "Fundraising is really hand-in-glove with raising community awareness of who you are as an organisation. Especially when it is as fun as what Adam did, it engages people as they find it amusing and think it's really great. It also allowed us to incorporate another local business into the campaign. The local barber shop that he went to get it all done did it all for free because they loved the idea! So it really engaged with them as well. We were also in the local newspapers so it really did help raise awareness in the community. It was such a unique and different thing for somebody to do". Did it take a lot of resource from your organisation to manage the fundraising campaign? "Adam did a lot of it himself and he certainly raised what he wanted to. He set up the Localgiving page under my suggestion. He is actually my son! But he did most of it himself, I didn't hold his hand or anything. All that we had to do off the back of his efforts was try and share it around different forums as much as we could and have posters and things up in the centre. He took the campaign to his workplace which really helped. They were very proactive and actually donated £100 to the campaign. They had to sanction that he could do it in the first place! In the business he is in he does go to meetings and things so they had to agree that it was okay for him to do it". "I feel like Localgiving does give a lot of support to people that are trying to do something like this off of their own volition and we as an organisation tried to offer a level of support as well. I think that's the least you can do if someone's going to put themselves out there in order to raise money for your organisation".  It's a combination of things right? Obviously it is ultimately up to the fundraiser themselves but the more support they can get from us, the platform, and from you guys, the charity, the better right? "Thats right!" So last question, what top tip would you give other Local charities if they were thinking of approaching people to become fundraisers? "Come up with ideas. I think it's quite difficult if you just say "we want you to raise money’’ but you don't have any ideas to get started. Think outside the box a little bit. Everybody knows the usual things like coffee mornings or something like that. That will appeal to a certain sector of society but if you want to make your reach broader I think you need to introduce a variety of different activities and also see where you could perhaps engage other sectors of the community. For example the business world, local shops, people in your local area. Even if it is approaching them to donate a prize or to sponsor and aspect of what you are trying to achieve". "I also think people will be more interested in things that they find interesting, amusing or exciting. I think this engages people more than just standing on the street corner shaking a bucket. People find that quite off putting now actually so you want to try and avoid that really. Think about all the different aspects of who you are trying to engage. You want to especially engage young people because they are the potential future users of your charity (depending on what it is). Don't always pitch it where you think the money is. Often you will find it's the people who have little who give the most". Well that is often true and I think Adam is certainly a brilliant ambassador for the "think outside the box’’ approach to fundraising! Thanks Nicky! Yeleni Therapy & Support Complementary Health Centre are holding a Wellbeing day in collaboration with Kemble at home on Saturday 4th March 10 am til 4pm. All proceeds from the raffle and donations are going to Yeleni. Evi Hudson is also running a fundraising page for Yelini this year. Her ''hair today, gone tomorrow'' campaign is already underway! Help her by making a donation here. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Bright Light Bright Light's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds! Big Strong Hearts: Training Tips for your Charity Challenge
    Mar 06, 2017 2062