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  • 13 Jun 2019
      NB. This blog was written by a colleague and friend who wishes to remain anonymous. The words “queer” and “Muslim” are a paradoxical association. You cannot be a good Muslim and be queer. Or partake in queer culture without giving up what is, effectively, an essential part of your identity and sense of self. Or that is what I thought. Growing up in Italy, a country where being brown and wearing a headscarf are no easy task, I spent way too much energy trying to prove to my peers that I was one of the “good ones”. Between acing school to demonstrate that I was just as clever, and being extremely hyper-aware of how I presented myself (be it the packed lunch I took to school, the clothes I wore, the languages I spoke), little energy was left to reckon with my sexuality. Along with this came the religious guilt, that overwhelming feeling that, by admitting what deep down I knew is true, I would let God down, I would fail at being a good Muslim and might as well throw the towel on all of my efforts. Part of this was certainly the lack of visible role models. I didn’t know any bisexual, brown, Muslim women. I thought I was alone, and I thought I was - quite literally - committing a crime. The guilt was unbearable. Sometimes it still is. I debated for years about whether I could reconcile my faith and my sexuality, and for a long time it felt like one of the two had to go. As I am getting older, however, and gaining more self-awareness and accountability, I am opening up to the possibility that the two – my faith and my sexuality – are not a zero-sum game. I am slowly learning to let go of the guilt, and to treat myself with kindness and compassion, just as I would treat any other friend on the same boat. If you or someone you know is going through a similar experience (regardless of religion, faith, or lack thereof), here’s what teenage me desperately needed to hear: You are not wrong or broken. The only thing you’ve done is to love other human beings. That couldn’t possibly be wrong, right? Faith is not black and white. Faith is at your service. It is meant to inspire and guide you. You are absolutely not alone. There are SO MANY PEOPLE that feel just like you! Related to the above, the internet is great. Do your googles. Find your tribe. There is no such thing as “queer culture”. Never feel like you have to suppress your faith and/or culture to conform to what a queer person is supposed to look and act like. Related to the above, being a “culturally diverse” member of the LGBT+ community can sometimes be seen as a form of “bravery” (the amount of “you are not like other Muslims” comments I receive, oh my!). Beware that. That is yet another form of othering! Localgiving is proud to work with LGBTQI+ groups from across the UK. There are many ways you can get involved with these groups - be it as a volunteer, beneficiary, donor or fundraiser. Why not find a group near you now? Here are just a few of the groups we work with: The Proud Trust Gendered Intelligence  The Kite Project  HERE NI  Q- Alliance  Viva LGBT+   Norwich Pride Norfolk LGBT+ Project Coventry Pride - Pride Cymru
    335 Posted by Lewis Garland
  •   NB. This blog was written by a colleague and friend who wishes to remain anonymous. The words “queer” and “Muslim” are a paradoxical association. You cannot be a good Muslim and be queer. Or partake in queer culture without giving up what is, effectively, an essential part of your identity and sense of self. Or that is what I thought. Growing up in Italy, a country where being brown and wearing a headscarf are no easy task, I spent way too much energy trying to prove to my peers that I was one of the “good ones”. Between acing school to demonstrate that I was just as clever, and being extremely hyper-aware of how I presented myself (be it the packed lunch I took to school, the clothes I wore, the languages I spoke), little energy was left to reckon with my sexuality. Along with this came the religious guilt, that overwhelming feeling that, by admitting what deep down I knew is true, I would let God down, I would fail at being a good Muslim and might as well throw the towel on all of my efforts. Part of this was certainly the lack of visible role models. I didn’t know any bisexual, brown, Muslim women. I thought I was alone, and I thought I was - quite literally - committing a crime. The guilt was unbearable. Sometimes it still is. I debated for years about whether I could reconcile my faith and my sexuality, and for a long time it felt like one of the two had to go. As I am getting older, however, and gaining more self-awareness and accountability, I am opening up to the possibility that the two – my faith and my sexuality – are not a zero-sum game. I am slowly learning to let go of the guilt, and to treat myself with kindness and compassion, just as I would treat any other friend on the same boat. If you or someone you know is going through a similar experience (regardless of religion, faith, or lack thereof), here’s what teenage me desperately needed to hear: You are not wrong or broken. The only thing you’ve done is to love other human beings. That couldn’t possibly be wrong, right? Faith is not black and white. Faith is at your service. It is meant to inspire and guide you. You are absolutely not alone. There are SO MANY PEOPLE that feel just like you! Related to the above, the internet is great. Do your googles. Find your tribe. There is no such thing as “queer culture”. Never feel like you have to suppress your faith and/or culture to conform to what a queer person is supposed to look and act like. Related to the above, being a “culturally diverse” member of the LGBT+ community can sometimes be seen as a form of “bravery” (the amount of “you are not like other Muslims” comments I receive, oh my!). Beware that. That is yet another form of othering! Localgiving is proud to work with LGBTQI+ groups from across the UK. There are many ways you can get involved with these groups - be it as a volunteer, beneficiary, donor or fundraiser. Why not find a group near you now? Here are just a few of the groups we work with: The Proud Trust Gendered Intelligence  The Kite Project  HERE NI  Q- Alliance  Viva LGBT+   Norwich Pride Norfolk LGBT+ Project Coventry Pride - Pride Cymru
    Jun 13, 2019 335
  • 29 May 2019
    We are delighted to have distributed £92,000 in grant funding to 184 groups in the first round of our Magic Little Grants Fund 2019.   This round has seen us support a wide range of local organisations across Great Britain including walking groups, wheelchair basketball teams, swimming clubs and many more!   Our Magic Little Grants, funded by Postcode Community Trust, are open to local charities and community groups in Great Britain that support and inspire people to participate in sports or exercise.   As well as receiving a £500 Magic Little Grant, successful organisations that are new to Localgiving will also be given a free annual membership with Localgiving worth £96. Applicants for Magic Little Grants must either be in their first year of operation or have an annual income under £250,000. Preference will be given to projects that encourage social cohesion and help vulnerable people to overcome barriers to participation in physical activities. The deadline for applications for Magic Little Grants 2019 is midnight on 30th November 2019. Find out more and apply HERE.        
  • We are delighted to have distributed £92,000 in grant funding to 184 groups in the first round of our Magic Little Grants Fund 2019.   This round has seen us support a wide range of local organisations across Great Britain including walking groups, wheelchair basketball teams, swimming clubs and many more!   Our Magic Little Grants, funded by Postcode Community Trust, are open to local charities and community groups in Great Britain that support and inspire people to participate in sports or exercise.   As well as receiving a £500 Magic Little Grant, successful organisations that are new to Localgiving will also be given a free annual membership with Localgiving worth £96. Applicants for Magic Little Grants must either be in their first year of operation or have an annual income under £250,000. Preference will be given to projects that encourage social cohesion and help vulnerable people to overcome barriers to participation in physical activities. The deadline for applications for Magic Little Grants 2019 is midnight on 30th November 2019. Find out more and apply HERE.        
    May 29, 2019 744
  • 29 May 2019
    In April 2019 hundreds of fundraisers took part in our annual Local Hero fundraiser competition. After a tightly fought race, Nathan Swain took bronze position in the competition, having run the London Marathon in support of Safe Families for Children Wales. Thanks to Nathan’s third place finish, Safe Families for Children Wales were awarded a prize of £500, adding to the phenomenal £2,300 he had already accrued through online donations. Once his calves had recovered, Nathan kindly took the time to talk to us about his challenge and his charity of choice. How did you get involved with Safe Families for Children? “Through my line of work I am aware of the adverse impact children placed in foster care can experience, and the residual effect it can have for years to come. Through a notice on my local church notice board I became aware of the work of Safe Families for Children, a charity working hand-in-hand with local children’s services to link families in need with a network of local volunteers who can offer them support, intervening before formal involvement of the care system." How did you decide upon you challenge and what preparation did you need to do? "Having been a runner for around three years, and becoming comfortable at the Half Marathon distance, I felt it was time to challenge myself with a marathon and managed to secure a ballot place at the London Marathon. What should’ve been prime running time over the winter was ridden with injuries which prevented me running, but I managed to keep fit through cycling. In early spring I was able to get running again and got out two or three times a week to get race ready.” What did you most enjoy most about your challenge and taking part in the Local Hero competition? “I really enjoyed pushing myself, and knowing that my efforts were not only for my personal gain, but had helped secure important finances for a small volunteer led charity I found it enjoyable getting on the leaderboard early which spurred me on to encourage more people to donate and help secure additional prize money funding for the charity.” Why do you think your campaign was such a success? “It was a combination of a marathon being a big challenge and choosing a charity that people could relate to and see tangible benefits through their donations. I feel more people were willing to donate to support me because I wasn’t running for a large national charity, I wouldn’t be part of 100 runners fundraising for the same cause – instead I would be the only runner wearing Safe Families colours, and would be the only person fundraising to support their work.” What channels did you use to promote your challenge and why? “I predominantly promoted my fundraising to friends and family through my social media accounts on Instagram and Facebook. My posts were also shared through Safe Families for Children’s accounts, which raised awareness to a wider audience of individuals who were already aware of and supportive of their work.” Do you know if Safe families have any specific plans or projects for this funding /what will be the impact of this funding. “I am due to meet with the Chairman of Trustees soon, to gain an understanding of the impact my fundraising will have for this charity and the work it will support.” What advice would you give to someone interested in fundraising for a local charity? “People tend to be unaware of the great work undertaken by small charities in their area. Fundraising for them will not only help fund their activities, but raise their profile in the community. Having fundraised for both national and small charities such as Safe Families, I found it more rewarding to be promoting the work of a small charity, and more encouraging to know that the money I raise will be going directly to helping their cause rather than covering overheads.” Set up a fundraising page for a local charity today.
    672 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • In April 2019 hundreds of fundraisers took part in our annual Local Hero fundraiser competition. After a tightly fought race, Nathan Swain took bronze position in the competition, having run the London Marathon in support of Safe Families for Children Wales. Thanks to Nathan’s third place finish, Safe Families for Children Wales were awarded a prize of £500, adding to the phenomenal £2,300 he had already accrued through online donations. Once his calves had recovered, Nathan kindly took the time to talk to us about his challenge and his charity of choice. How did you get involved with Safe Families for Children? “Through my line of work I am aware of the adverse impact children placed in foster care can experience, and the residual effect it can have for years to come. Through a notice on my local church notice board I became aware of the work of Safe Families for Children, a charity working hand-in-hand with local children’s services to link families in need with a network of local volunteers who can offer them support, intervening before formal involvement of the care system." How did you decide upon you challenge and what preparation did you need to do? "Having been a runner for around three years, and becoming comfortable at the Half Marathon distance, I felt it was time to challenge myself with a marathon and managed to secure a ballot place at the London Marathon. What should’ve been prime running time over the winter was ridden with injuries which prevented me running, but I managed to keep fit through cycling. In early spring I was able to get running again and got out two or three times a week to get race ready.” What did you most enjoy most about your challenge and taking part in the Local Hero competition? “I really enjoyed pushing myself, and knowing that my efforts were not only for my personal gain, but had helped secure important finances for a small volunteer led charity I found it enjoyable getting on the leaderboard early which spurred me on to encourage more people to donate and help secure additional prize money funding for the charity.” Why do you think your campaign was such a success? “It was a combination of a marathon being a big challenge and choosing a charity that people could relate to and see tangible benefits through their donations. I feel more people were willing to donate to support me because I wasn’t running for a large national charity, I wouldn’t be part of 100 runners fundraising for the same cause – instead I would be the only runner wearing Safe Families colours, and would be the only person fundraising to support their work.” What channels did you use to promote your challenge and why? “I predominantly promoted my fundraising to friends and family through my social media accounts on Instagram and Facebook. My posts were also shared through Safe Families for Children’s accounts, which raised awareness to a wider audience of individuals who were already aware of and supportive of their work.” Do you know if Safe families have any specific plans or projects for this funding /what will be the impact of this funding. “I am due to meet with the Chairman of Trustees soon, to gain an understanding of the impact my fundraising will have for this charity and the work it will support.” What advice would you give to someone interested in fundraising for a local charity? “People tend to be unaware of the great work undertaken by small charities in their area. Fundraising for them will not only help fund their activities, but raise their profile in the community. Having fundraised for both national and small charities such as Safe Families, I found it more rewarding to be promoting the work of a small charity, and more encouraging to know that the money I raise will be going directly to helping their cause rather than covering overheads.” Set up a fundraising page for a local charity today.
    May 29, 2019 672
  • 28 May 2019
    This year’s Local Hero campaign came to a thrilling end at the stroke of midnight on 30th April 2019. Thank you to every fundraiser, group and donor who participated in this year’s Local Hero campaign. A particular congratulations must go to those fundraisers who made it onto our hallowed Local Hero leaderboard. Your incredible effort, creativity and generosity made this our most successful Local Hero campaign to date.During the month of April, 453 fundraisers raised £160k from 6,261 donors for 209 local groups.After a nail-biting finish, we are delighted to announce Ben Kane as our Local Hero champion 2019. Ben secured a phenomenal 218 donations worth £10K for Park In The Past Community Interest Company, plus an extra £1000 in prize money. Ben, a Best-Selling historical-fiction author, used the competition to bring his passion for the Roman Empire to life. Ben Kane walked the length of Hadrian's wall in full centurion attire, accompanied by his 12 year old son. The author secured an incredible 218 unique donations for his walk, raising over £10k including £1000 in prize money for Park in the Past CIC. Local Hero Champion 2019, Ben Kane, said: "I've been interested in the idea of Park in the Past ever since hearing about it.The idea of a living Roman museum, the likes of which does not exist in the UK, is absolutely thrilling, and I intend to do everything in my power to make sure it becomes a reality. I really enjoyed taking part in the Local Hero competition and I hope that the money raised in April will go a long way to achieving this dream". Park in the Past said: “Localgiving and their superb initiative Local Hero has made a really big difference to our heritage project, Park in the Past. Sunday Times Award winning author Ben Kane has walked Hadrian's Wall with his 12 year old son Ferdia to highlight what we are aiming to achieve on our 120 acre site in North Wales creating a huge amount of interest and money in the process. The funds from Local Hero will make a big impact this year as we continue building a full size Roman fort and Celtic village using authentic construction techniques and materials. Ben is a real life hero having raised tens of thousands of pounds to date. His boundless enthusiasm and determination with the help of the Localgiving team will enable us to turn our vision into a extraordinary reality for everyone to enjoy as they step back to a land lost in time!" Another £4,000 in prizes have been awarded to the causes supported by the other top 19 fundraisers. Nathan S who finished in third place, securing a £500 prize for Safe Families for Children Wales, said: “I really enjoyed pushing myself, and knowing that my efforts were not only for my personal gain, but had helped secure important finances for a small volunteer led charity I found it enjoyable getting on the leaderboard early which spurred me on to encourage more people to donate and help secure additional prize money funding for the charity". You can read a full interview with Nathan about his Local Hero 2019 experience here.
  • This year’s Local Hero campaign came to a thrilling end at the stroke of midnight on 30th April 2019. Thank you to every fundraiser, group and donor who participated in this year’s Local Hero campaign. A particular congratulations must go to those fundraisers who made it onto our hallowed Local Hero leaderboard. Your incredible effort, creativity and generosity made this our most successful Local Hero campaign to date.During the month of April, 453 fundraisers raised £160k from 6,261 donors for 209 local groups.After a nail-biting finish, we are delighted to announce Ben Kane as our Local Hero champion 2019. Ben secured a phenomenal 218 donations worth £10K for Park In The Past Community Interest Company, plus an extra £1000 in prize money. Ben, a Best-Selling historical-fiction author, used the competition to bring his passion for the Roman Empire to life. Ben Kane walked the length of Hadrian's wall in full centurion attire, accompanied by his 12 year old son. The author secured an incredible 218 unique donations for his walk, raising over £10k including £1000 in prize money for Park in the Past CIC. Local Hero Champion 2019, Ben Kane, said: "I've been interested in the idea of Park in the Past ever since hearing about it.The idea of a living Roman museum, the likes of which does not exist in the UK, is absolutely thrilling, and I intend to do everything in my power to make sure it becomes a reality. I really enjoyed taking part in the Local Hero competition and I hope that the money raised in April will go a long way to achieving this dream". Park in the Past said: “Localgiving and their superb initiative Local Hero has made a really big difference to our heritage project, Park in the Past. Sunday Times Award winning author Ben Kane has walked Hadrian's Wall with his 12 year old son Ferdia to highlight what we are aiming to achieve on our 120 acre site in North Wales creating a huge amount of interest and money in the process. The funds from Local Hero will make a big impact this year as we continue building a full size Roman fort and Celtic village using authentic construction techniques and materials. Ben is a real life hero having raised tens of thousands of pounds to date. His boundless enthusiasm and determination with the help of the Localgiving team will enable us to turn our vision into a extraordinary reality for everyone to enjoy as they step back to a land lost in time!" Another £4,000 in prizes have been awarded to the causes supported by the other top 19 fundraisers. Nathan S who finished in third place, securing a £500 prize for Safe Families for Children Wales, said: “I really enjoyed pushing myself, and knowing that my efforts were not only for my personal gain, but had helped secure important finances for a small volunteer led charity I found it enjoyable getting on the leaderboard early which spurred me on to encourage more people to donate and help secure additional prize money funding for the charity". You can read a full interview with Nathan about his Local Hero 2019 experience here.
    May 28, 2019 382
  • 23 May 2019
    Charitable causes across Wales have now raised over £500,000 in funding through Localgiving. Localgiving’s Wales Development Programme has been running since July 2016. In this time over 350 charities and community groups have received a year of free fundraising support. Through the programme groups can access face-to-face training wherever they are based, Gift Aid and access to Localgiving’s incentivised giving campaigns. Each group is given £200 match funding, making it as easy as possible for them to launch their fundraising, as online donations are doubled until this is used up. The Wales members cover all 22 counties and range from tiny local groups run by volunteers to charities with staff operating across a larger area or county. Lauren Swain, Localgiving’s Wales Development Manager, runs the programme. There are 7 free places left on the programme, as it is now almost fully subscribed 8 months ahead of target. After 34 months of the programme, Localgiving has already helped groups to raise over £500,000 and provided 255 1:1 training sessions. In a recent funder report, 87% of members have seen a positive impact on their fundraising and 89% are more confident with online fundraising. The programme has vitally filled a gap in Wales, as 94% of groups previously had no access to online fundraising training and support locally. Localgiving has worked closely with the WCVA and the 19 CVCs to reach groups across every area. The CVCs have been brilliant in promoting the opportunity and hosting the 75 workshops that Localgiving has run for 485 across every county in Wales. The programme is funded by National Lottery Community Fund and Garfield Weston Foundation – we are very excited at how much amazing impact their support has had!   These are some of our Wales members and how they feel about the programme: Paul Popham Fund have been members of Localgiving since October 2016 and have raised over £14,500 from 445 donations, including £425 of match funding. The Bridge Mentoring Plus Scheme have been members of Localgiving since August 2016 and have raised over £6100, including £720 of match funding. Colwyn Victoria Pier Trust have been members of Localgiving since June 2017 and have raised over £2100 from 74 donations, including £610 of match funding.    
  • Charitable causes across Wales have now raised over £500,000 in funding through Localgiving. Localgiving’s Wales Development Programme has been running since July 2016. In this time over 350 charities and community groups have received a year of free fundraising support. Through the programme groups can access face-to-face training wherever they are based, Gift Aid and access to Localgiving’s incentivised giving campaigns. Each group is given £200 match funding, making it as easy as possible for them to launch their fundraising, as online donations are doubled until this is used up. The Wales members cover all 22 counties and range from tiny local groups run by volunteers to charities with staff operating across a larger area or county. Lauren Swain, Localgiving’s Wales Development Manager, runs the programme. There are 7 free places left on the programme, as it is now almost fully subscribed 8 months ahead of target. After 34 months of the programme, Localgiving has already helped groups to raise over £500,000 and provided 255 1:1 training sessions. In a recent funder report, 87% of members have seen a positive impact on their fundraising and 89% are more confident with online fundraising. The programme has vitally filled a gap in Wales, as 94% of groups previously had no access to online fundraising training and support locally. Localgiving has worked closely with the WCVA and the 19 CVCs to reach groups across every area. The CVCs have been brilliant in promoting the opportunity and hosting the 75 workshops that Localgiving has run for 485 across every county in Wales. The programme is funded by National Lottery Community Fund and Garfield Weston Foundation – we are very excited at how much amazing impact their support has had!   These are some of our Wales members and how they feel about the programme: Paul Popham Fund have been members of Localgiving since October 2016 and have raised over £14,500 from 445 donations, including £425 of match funding. The Bridge Mentoring Plus Scheme have been members of Localgiving since August 2016 and have raised over £6100, including £720 of match funding. Colwyn Victoria Pier Trust have been members of Localgiving since June 2017 and have raised over £2100 from 74 donations, including £610 of match funding.    
    May 23, 2019 621
  • 09 Apr 2019
    An African family with two little girls under the age of 4 and a third child on the way need your help. They are fighting the threat of deportation to their home country which would put both of their little girls in danger of female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM is a ritual that takes place in some countries that involves the cutting or removal of some or all of the external female genitalia. If the family is forced to return home, there is a high risk that the local community would force the family to have FGM inflicted on the little girls. This would violate their human rights and put their physical and mental health at serious risk. If they are deported and refuse to have FGM carried out on their children, they will be ostracised from their communities and the girls will face stigma and difficulties to marry and integrate later in life.  The family applied for asylum in the UK in the search for a safer future but their case has been refused, and their situation has been unresolved since 2014. Since then, the family have remained in limbo, living in destitution and the threat of deportation has resulted in anxiety and poor mental health for the family. We need to raise a total of £1,500 to cover the solicitor and barrister fees involved with the appeal. These fees have been lowered at the discretion of the solicitor, as he has been working with the family for some time now and he sympathises with their case. The family have lived in the UK for 17 years now and have made it their home. Their little girls were born in England and also see it as their home - they do not know any other country or culture. The family has integrated into British culture, become a part of the local parish and are valued members of the Borderlands community. The parents volunteer in their spare time, including at the local farm which benefits local agriculture and food production in Bristol. This young family needs your support to ensure they can continue their lives here and to keep their children safe from this highly dangerous, damaging and traumatic procedure. April Humble is Director of Borderlands, a charity working with refugees and asylum seekers in Bristol, and has been working in the field internationally for 10 years. Donate Now
    1546 Posted by April Humble
  • An African family with two little girls under the age of 4 and a third child on the way need your help. They are fighting the threat of deportation to their home country which would put both of their little girls in danger of female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM is a ritual that takes place in some countries that involves the cutting or removal of some or all of the external female genitalia. If the family is forced to return home, there is a high risk that the local community would force the family to have FGM inflicted on the little girls. This would violate their human rights and put their physical and mental health at serious risk. If they are deported and refuse to have FGM carried out on their children, they will be ostracised from their communities and the girls will face stigma and difficulties to marry and integrate later in life.  The family applied for asylum in the UK in the search for a safer future but their case has been refused, and their situation has been unresolved since 2014. Since then, the family have remained in limbo, living in destitution and the threat of deportation has resulted in anxiety and poor mental health for the family. We need to raise a total of £1,500 to cover the solicitor and barrister fees involved with the appeal. These fees have been lowered at the discretion of the solicitor, as he has been working with the family for some time now and he sympathises with their case. The family have lived in the UK for 17 years now and have made it their home. Their little girls were born in England and also see it as their home - they do not know any other country or culture. The family has integrated into British culture, become a part of the local parish and are valued members of the Borderlands community. The parents volunteer in their spare time, including at the local farm which benefits local agriculture and food production in Bristol. This young family needs your support to ensure they can continue their lives here and to keep their children safe from this highly dangerous, damaging and traumatic procedure. April Humble is Director of Borderlands, a charity working with refugees and asylum seekers in Bristol, and has been working in the field internationally for 10 years. Donate Now
    Apr 09, 2019 1546

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  • 31 Aug 2016
    Alex Swallow is The Influence Expert, helping you to grow your influence to increase the impact that you have on the world. He is also the Founder of Young Charity Trustees and the owner of the Social Good Six interview series. He is the previous Chief Executive of the Small Charities Coalition and maintains a keen interest in the work of small charities. Having only worked in the charity sector at small charities and having been the Chief Executive of a support organisation for small charities, I know the pressure that you are under. Pressure to gain supporters behind your cause, get in enough money and cope in a challenging environment. There are three things that I’d recommend: Don’t fight alone, value your work and grow your influence.   Don’t fight alone I hope that you are already getting help from other people. This post that I wrote for Small Charity Week last year explains some of the help that you can get. You need to get all the support that you can, including bringing in new Trustees and other volunteers if you feel that you need new skills, experience or ideas. Trustees’ Week is coming up in November and is an ideal time to recruit. Value your work I hope that you are proud of the work that you do. However, it is likely that you don’t get enough recognition for it. Many small charities are not in the public spotlight despite doing amazing things for parts of society where no-one else really helps. I’m a supporter of Good News Shared- you can send them your stories if you would like to get a bit of attention! However you do it, you need to find a way to make sure that you are proud of your work because then you will be able to engage other people in what you are doing. Plus, being proud will be good motivation for you in those lonely hours when you are slogging away trying to make the world a better place. Also, this talk that I gave for The Media Trust shows why small charities should be excited about some of the opportunities that the online world now provides. Remember, among all the challenges there are lots of possibilities to take advantage of too. Grow your influence This article gives a comprehensive discussion of what I mean by influence. As a small charity you might not always be able to compete with the big boys all the time, but you can certainly punch above your weight. To have the impact that you want you need to find the appropriate ways to influence the world around you. In this speech that I gave earlier this year at an international charity conference, I outline some of those ways. Using a model called the LEAPS Model, featured in the video, I show how you can grow your influence as an individual, or apply the same concepts to an organisation. If you can effectively grow your influence you have the chance to achieve all of the things that you need to make sure that your charity not only survives, but thrives. I thank you for your important work and hope that the three principles I have outlined help you get to where you want to be. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:   5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandGet your charity’s voice heard by Duncan HatfieldDon’t save your pitch for the elevator by Emma Beeston  
    22802 Posted by Alex Swallow
  • Alex Swallow is The Influence Expert, helping you to grow your influence to increase the impact that you have on the world. He is also the Founder of Young Charity Trustees and the owner of the Social Good Six interview series. He is the previous Chief Executive of the Small Charities Coalition and maintains a keen interest in the work of small charities. Having only worked in the charity sector at small charities and having been the Chief Executive of a support organisation for small charities, I know the pressure that you are under. Pressure to gain supporters behind your cause, get in enough money and cope in a challenging environment. There are three things that I’d recommend: Don’t fight alone, value your work and grow your influence.   Don’t fight alone I hope that you are already getting help from other people. This post that I wrote for Small Charity Week last year explains some of the help that you can get. You need to get all the support that you can, including bringing in new Trustees and other volunteers if you feel that you need new skills, experience or ideas. Trustees’ Week is coming up in November and is an ideal time to recruit. Value your work I hope that you are proud of the work that you do. However, it is likely that you don’t get enough recognition for it. Many small charities are not in the public spotlight despite doing amazing things for parts of society where no-one else really helps. I’m a supporter of Good News Shared- you can send them your stories if you would like to get a bit of attention! However you do it, you need to find a way to make sure that you are proud of your work because then you will be able to engage other people in what you are doing. Plus, being proud will be good motivation for you in those lonely hours when you are slogging away trying to make the world a better place. Also, this talk that I gave for The Media Trust shows why small charities should be excited about some of the opportunities that the online world now provides. Remember, among all the challenges there are lots of possibilities to take advantage of too. Grow your influence This article gives a comprehensive discussion of what I mean by influence. As a small charity you might not always be able to compete with the big boys all the time, but you can certainly punch above your weight. To have the impact that you want you need to find the appropriate ways to influence the world around you. In this speech that I gave earlier this year at an international charity conference, I outline some of those ways. Using a model called the LEAPS Model, featured in the video, I show how you can grow your influence as an individual, or apply the same concepts to an organisation. If you can effectively grow your influence you have the chance to achieve all of the things that you need to make sure that your charity not only survives, but thrives. I thank you for your important work and hope that the three principles I have outlined help you get to where you want to be. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:   5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandGet your charity’s voice heard by Duncan HatfieldDon’t save your pitch for the elevator by Emma Beeston  
    Aug 31, 2016 22802
  • 29 Sep 2015
    Your organisation is doing incredible work – you know it, your staff and volunteers know it, but does anyone else? By sharing stories of your work and the impact it is having you can attract more supporters, volunteers, staff, and even the people you are helping. While it is worth the effort in the long term, it is not easy to get your story the attention it deserves. With more and more content being shared it is really important to do everything you can to make your content stand out. Here are five free tools you can use to get your story heard: 1) Pixabay You will have heard the phrase ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’. It is so true, especially today with more and more people and organisations writing blogs and newsletters. Having a good image can bring your story to life. Using your own photos of your work is ideal but if you need to use a stock photo Pixabay is the place to go. It can be difficult to find free images that are high quality, plus you need to think about copyright issues and attribution requirements. With Pixabay you have access – for free – to thousands of high quality royalty free stock images. You can use any image without attribution, so the only thing you need to spend time on is finding the image you want to use.  A photo found on Pixabay 2) Canva You have great images now, but what are you going to do with them? And how can you make them unique? Canva, an incredible tool which is free to use (for the most part), will help you create designs for the Internet or print. You can make graphics for your blog posts, presentations, Facebook covers, flyers, Christmas cards, event invitations, and more – all for free. Some of the images available do have a small charge ($1) but with the images available to you via Pixabay you shouldn’t need to pay for any images on Canva. Canva is so easy to use, you really don’t need to be an experienced designer to be able to create something on there.  Each month I update the Good News Shared Facebook cover using Canva 3) Mailchimp Once you have people interested in your organisation it is important to build a relationship with them. Mailchimp is a great tool to use for this, as you can manage your contacts and send them an email regularly without it taking up too much of your time. Best of all, it’s free for up to 2,000 subscribers and 12,000 emails per month. 4) Charity Comms Ask Charity Service The AskCharity service is a great way for you to get your story seen and used by journalists. Charities sign up to receive requests from journalists looking for case studies, interviews or information. When you see a request your charity can help with you simply get in touch with the journalist using the contact details they have given. Smaller charities do not always have the time to pitch to journalists. Being part of the AskCharity service gives organisations the chance of raising awareness of their work by being included in articles without having to spend lots of time finding contacts and building relationships with journalists. 5) Do-it Trust While there are so many tools available now to help charities share their story, using any or all of them can still be too time-consuming for smaller charities. A way to overcome this problem is to find people who can help by signing up to the Do-it Trust website. Do-it Trust, the UK’s first national database service for volunteering, has over 100,000 volunteers from across the UK signed up. It is quick and easy to use, and will help you find the volunteers you are looking for in no time at all. ---- Nisha Kotecha is the Founder of Good News Shared, a website showcasing the impact and achievements of charitable organisations around the world. Nisha also hosts the Good News Shared podcast where she interviews volunteers to highlight stories that deserve to be heard.   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:   The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  Lessons for charities from Knee surgery by Richard Sved  Get your Charity's voice heard by Duncan Hatfield  
    9129 Posted by Nisha Kotecha
  • Your organisation is doing incredible work – you know it, your staff and volunteers know it, but does anyone else? By sharing stories of your work and the impact it is having you can attract more supporters, volunteers, staff, and even the people you are helping. While it is worth the effort in the long term, it is not easy to get your story the attention it deserves. With more and more content being shared it is really important to do everything you can to make your content stand out. Here are five free tools you can use to get your story heard: 1) Pixabay You will have heard the phrase ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’. It is so true, especially today with more and more people and organisations writing blogs and newsletters. Having a good image can bring your story to life. Using your own photos of your work is ideal but if you need to use a stock photo Pixabay is the place to go. It can be difficult to find free images that are high quality, plus you need to think about copyright issues and attribution requirements. With Pixabay you have access – for free – to thousands of high quality royalty free stock images. You can use any image without attribution, so the only thing you need to spend time on is finding the image you want to use.  A photo found on Pixabay 2) Canva You have great images now, but what are you going to do with them? And how can you make them unique? Canva, an incredible tool which is free to use (for the most part), will help you create designs for the Internet or print. You can make graphics for your blog posts, presentations, Facebook covers, flyers, Christmas cards, event invitations, and more – all for free. Some of the images available do have a small charge ($1) but with the images available to you via Pixabay you shouldn’t need to pay for any images on Canva. Canva is so easy to use, you really don’t need to be an experienced designer to be able to create something on there.  Each month I update the Good News Shared Facebook cover using Canva 3) Mailchimp Once you have people interested in your organisation it is important to build a relationship with them. Mailchimp is a great tool to use for this, as you can manage your contacts and send them an email regularly without it taking up too much of your time. Best of all, it’s free for up to 2,000 subscribers and 12,000 emails per month. 4) Charity Comms Ask Charity Service The AskCharity service is a great way for you to get your story seen and used by journalists. Charities sign up to receive requests from journalists looking for case studies, interviews or information. When you see a request your charity can help with you simply get in touch with the journalist using the contact details they have given. Smaller charities do not always have the time to pitch to journalists. Being part of the AskCharity service gives organisations the chance of raising awareness of their work by being included in articles without having to spend lots of time finding contacts and building relationships with journalists. 5) Do-it Trust While there are so many tools available now to help charities share their story, using any or all of them can still be too time-consuming for smaller charities. A way to overcome this problem is to find people who can help by signing up to the Do-it Trust website. Do-it Trust, the UK’s first national database service for volunteering, has over 100,000 volunteers from across the UK signed up. It is quick and easy to use, and will help you find the volunteers you are looking for in no time at all. ---- Nisha Kotecha is the Founder of Good News Shared, a website showcasing the impact and achievements of charitable organisations around the world. Nisha also hosts the Good News Shared podcast where she interviews volunteers to highlight stories that deserve to be heard.   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:   The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  Lessons for charities from Knee surgery by Richard Sved  Get your Charity's voice heard by Duncan Hatfield  
    Sep 29, 2015 9129
  • 12 Jan 2017
    Social media is currently the number one reason people use the Internet, according to a study from Pew Research. It dominates online activity, and chances are your charity is already using it. Compelling social media content comes in many different forms. There is no secret formula to creating great content, it doesn’t need to take up a lot of time, go viral, or be professionally produced in order to be successful. Engagement is the key, and paying more to create content won’t necessarily bring success. What really matters is how the people you want to reach engage with the content you post. These top tips will help your organisation think about creating content that actively engages the people that matter most to you, whether that’s beneficiaries, volunteers, donors, staff or others, no matter your size or budget. 1. You don’t need a massive budget Many charities will tell you that they don’t have enough time or resources to accomplish everything that they’d like on social. Think of social media as a platform for storytelling. As a charitable organisation, you are already surrounded by great original content material, from articles on your website, volunteers in action, or the stories of people or communities you have helped. There are many ways you can re-purpose this content for your social media channels. Creating a posting plan can help you get started and feel more in control, but it doesn’t have to be perfect right away. Try things out, take note of what works for your audience, and tweak your content as you go along. For further guidance and examples of good practice on this, check out our free guide ‘What’s Data Got To Do With It’. 2. It’s not all about numbers When it comes to your content, quality reigns over quantity. Engaging with a handful of relevant, switched-on people will give greater results than simply reaching as many people as possible. It sounds obvious, but be social, connect with and reach out to your closest supporters in a similar way to how you would focus your personal time on close friends. The more you engage with your target audience, the more people will respond to your content, and engage others to do the same. By using material unique to your organisation, such as sharing a short video of someone your charity has helped, you are creating authentic, high quality content that will bring people closer to your cause. 3. Make your content fun Don’t be afraid to find the light in tough subject matter. Fun and inspiring content can go a long way to engage your audience. Get creative, try out something new, and give any and all ideas a chance. Taco Bell does this really well, and we have previously written about what your charity can learn from them. For successful image and video content, authenticity and storytelling produce the highest engagement. You can easily incorporate this into your social media by telling your audience about something that has happened as a result of your organisation, such as a successful fundraising event, though a photo or video that you have created yourself. A smartphone can provide you with all the tools to create fresh, engaging images and videos for your social media channels. Simply taking a photo of a volunteer in action can be compelling content for the right audience. For more tips on creating great content for your organisation take a look at our free guide ‘Something To Tweet About’. Hannah is the Junior Communications and Social Media Advisor at Social Misfits Media, specialising in helping charities, foundations and non-profits better use social media to reach their goals. Follow Hannah and Social Misfits Media @HannahDonald20 and @MisfitsMedia. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Value of online Fundraising: More than just donations Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 What Makes Local Charities Unique?     Image: https://www.pexels.com/photo/lg-smartphone-instagram-social-media-35177/
    8256 Posted by Hannah Donald
  • Social media is currently the number one reason people use the Internet, according to a study from Pew Research. It dominates online activity, and chances are your charity is already using it. Compelling social media content comes in many different forms. There is no secret formula to creating great content, it doesn’t need to take up a lot of time, go viral, or be professionally produced in order to be successful. Engagement is the key, and paying more to create content won’t necessarily bring success. What really matters is how the people you want to reach engage with the content you post. These top tips will help your organisation think about creating content that actively engages the people that matter most to you, whether that’s beneficiaries, volunteers, donors, staff or others, no matter your size or budget. 1. You don’t need a massive budget Many charities will tell you that they don’t have enough time or resources to accomplish everything that they’d like on social. Think of social media as a platform for storytelling. As a charitable organisation, you are already surrounded by great original content material, from articles on your website, volunteers in action, or the stories of people or communities you have helped. There are many ways you can re-purpose this content for your social media channels. Creating a posting plan can help you get started and feel more in control, but it doesn’t have to be perfect right away. Try things out, take note of what works for your audience, and tweak your content as you go along. For further guidance and examples of good practice on this, check out our free guide ‘What’s Data Got To Do With It’. 2. It’s not all about numbers When it comes to your content, quality reigns over quantity. Engaging with a handful of relevant, switched-on people will give greater results than simply reaching as many people as possible. It sounds obvious, but be social, connect with and reach out to your closest supporters in a similar way to how you would focus your personal time on close friends. The more you engage with your target audience, the more people will respond to your content, and engage others to do the same. By using material unique to your organisation, such as sharing a short video of someone your charity has helped, you are creating authentic, high quality content that will bring people closer to your cause. 3. Make your content fun Don’t be afraid to find the light in tough subject matter. Fun and inspiring content can go a long way to engage your audience. Get creative, try out something new, and give any and all ideas a chance. Taco Bell does this really well, and we have previously written about what your charity can learn from them. For successful image and video content, authenticity and storytelling produce the highest engagement. You can easily incorporate this into your social media by telling your audience about something that has happened as a result of your organisation, such as a successful fundraising event, though a photo or video that you have created yourself. A smartphone can provide you with all the tools to create fresh, engaging images and videos for your social media channels. Simply taking a photo of a volunteer in action can be compelling content for the right audience. For more tips on creating great content for your organisation take a look at our free guide ‘Something To Tweet About’. Hannah is the Junior Communications and Social Media Advisor at Social Misfits Media, specialising in helping charities, foundations and non-profits better use social media to reach their goals. Follow Hannah and Social Misfits Media @HannahDonald20 and @MisfitsMedia. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Value of online Fundraising: More than just donations Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 What Makes Local Charities Unique?     Image: https://www.pexels.com/photo/lg-smartphone-instagram-social-media-35177/
    Jan 12, 2017 8256
  • 19 Aug 2015
    Thinking of what you can do to fundraise for charity can sometimes be harder than the challenge itself! To help get those ideas flowing we've created an A - Z of fun activities you can do that'll be sure to get your friends and family to support you and your chosen charity. Think outside the box Running a marathon is an amazing achievement, but if running isn't for you there are loads of other ways you can raise money for a local charity. On Localgiving we've had all sorts of wacky ideas including eating 3 whole chickens in an hour and sitting in a baked bean bath while having your head shaved plus some creative ideas such as a vote on which songs a choir will sing at an event. Think local! Once you've come up with your idea all that's left is finding an amazing local charity or community group to fundraise for - and that's where we come in. We've got thousands of local voluntary groups that would love your support! Find one in your area by simply entering your postcode into our search and scrolling through the groups closest to you.                       
    8107 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Thinking of what you can do to fundraise for charity can sometimes be harder than the challenge itself! To help get those ideas flowing we've created an A - Z of fun activities you can do that'll be sure to get your friends and family to support you and your chosen charity. Think outside the box Running a marathon is an amazing achievement, but if running isn't for you there are loads of other ways you can raise money for a local charity. On Localgiving we've had all sorts of wacky ideas including eating 3 whole chickens in an hour and sitting in a baked bean bath while having your head shaved plus some creative ideas such as a vote on which songs a choir will sing at an event. Think local! Once you've come up with your idea all that's left is finding an amazing local charity or community group to fundraise for - and that's where we come in. We've got thousands of local voluntary groups that would love your support! Find one in your area by simply entering your postcode into our search and scrolling through the groups closest to you.                       
    Aug 19, 2015 8107
  • 16 Aug 2018
      Localgiving ambassador, Bright Light Bright Light has announced that he will be supporting seven Localgiving groups during his tour of the UK in September. Welsh born electro-pop musician, Rod Thomas (AKA Bright Light Bright Light), known for his work with Elton John, Erasure and his stunning performance on the Graham Norton Show, has always been passionate about supporting small, local charities. As an independent artist, Rod feels a real affinity with grassroots organisations. He sees his tour as an excellent opportunity both to bring in funds and raise the profile of his chosen causes. As Rod explained: “The best thing about touring is engaging with local communities and the people who try to make a difference within them. I worked with Lewis Garland of Localgiving to find charities in each city on the tour so that I could raise awareness of their fantastic work and help them out with donation collections at each of the shows. These charities are working hard to address issues where they live and make a real difference, and I want to do everything I can to help them.” Rod has chosen one Localgiving member to support for each of his upcoming tour dates. 20th Leeds : RETAS 23rd Bristol : Borderlands 24th Cardiff: Pride Cymru 25th Manchester: The Proud Trust 27th Glasgow : Theatre Nemo 28th Birmingham : Aston Performing Arts Academy  29th London: Gendered Intelligence For each date, Rod handpicked Localgiving causes that were both close to the venue and close to his heart – these include LGBTQI+ groups, refugee focussed charities and arts organisations.  There are two ways you can donate to his causes: Donate online by clicking on the charity name listed above (this will also give you the option of adding GiftAid). Remember to let us the group know you're a Bright Light Bright Light fan in the comments box! Make a cash donation at one of Bright Light Bright Light’s tour dates (Book tickets here) In the clip below Bright Light Bright Light explains why he feels supporting local charities is so important.  Found this blog interesting? You may also enjoy: Shining a Bright Light on Local Charities Fight for the right of LGBTQI asylum seekers
  •   Localgiving ambassador, Bright Light Bright Light has announced that he will be supporting seven Localgiving groups during his tour of the UK in September. Welsh born electro-pop musician, Rod Thomas (AKA Bright Light Bright Light), known for his work with Elton John, Erasure and his stunning performance on the Graham Norton Show, has always been passionate about supporting small, local charities. As an independent artist, Rod feels a real affinity with grassroots organisations. He sees his tour as an excellent opportunity both to bring in funds and raise the profile of his chosen causes. As Rod explained: “The best thing about touring is engaging with local communities and the people who try to make a difference within them. I worked with Lewis Garland of Localgiving to find charities in each city on the tour so that I could raise awareness of their fantastic work and help them out with donation collections at each of the shows. These charities are working hard to address issues where they live and make a real difference, and I want to do everything I can to help them.” Rod has chosen one Localgiving member to support for each of his upcoming tour dates. 20th Leeds : RETAS 23rd Bristol : Borderlands 24th Cardiff: Pride Cymru 25th Manchester: The Proud Trust 27th Glasgow : Theatre Nemo 28th Birmingham : Aston Performing Arts Academy  29th London: Gendered Intelligence For each date, Rod handpicked Localgiving causes that were both close to the venue and close to his heart – these include LGBTQI+ groups, refugee focussed charities and arts organisations.  There are two ways you can donate to his causes: Donate online by clicking on the charity name listed above (this will also give you the option of adding GiftAid). Remember to let us the group know you're a Bright Light Bright Light fan in the comments box! Make a cash donation at one of Bright Light Bright Light’s tour dates (Book tickets here) In the clip below Bright Light Bright Light explains why he feels supporting local charities is so important.  Found this blog interesting? You may also enjoy: Shining a Bright Light on Local Charities Fight for the right of LGBTQI asylum seekers
    Aug 16, 2018 7940
  • 07 Nov 2016
    You cannot be an expert in everything, but staff and volunteers at small charities often feel like they need to be, as they don’t have the budget to hire experts when they need them. Getting pro-bono support can be a huge help to a campaign or project, but finding the time to actually find this free expertise can be off-putting.   Here are three organisations providing pro-bono support that you should bookmark, so when the time comes you will know exactly where to look: LawWorks LawWorks is a charity working in England and Wales to connect volunteer lawyers with people in need of legal advice. Their Not-For-Profits Programme gives free legal advice to small not-for-profit organisations on a wide range of issues. These can include drafting a contract, reviewing a lease, updating a constitution/articles, or clarifying rights in a commercial dispute. The application process is simple: check your organisation is eligible, if it is you then need to fill in an online application form and send over your accounts. Once an application is approved, LawWorks try to find a volunteer to help you within a few weeks. Pimp My Cause Pimp my Cause is a web based platform bringing good causes in need of professional marketing support together with professional experts who are able to contribute this expertise for free. “Kay did a fantastic technical graphic for our small charity to use on the new website we are designing. Hughes syndrome is a blood clotting disorder that can affect any part of the body, so we wanted to have a clear image to show patient possible danger areas. Kay came to our rescue and produced a brilliant, clear graphic which our web designers are very happy to use. She also did it in record time and I feel a bit guilty that we won't be in a position to use it until the website launch in autumn. Our charity and, no doubt, patients in the future are truly grateful for Kay's expertise and time - thank you :) ” - Hughes Syndrome Foundation Whether you would like help on a new website design, a marketing campaign or a new logo, Pimp My Cause can help you find the expert you need. The process is simple – Register for free on the Pimp My Cause website, create a profile for your cause, then create an advert for the help you want. You can then search for volunteer experts and send them a message to see if they can help you, and you might even get experts getting in touch with you to offer their support. Jolly Good Causes Jolly Good Causes is a social enterprise offering pro-bono marketing support to small charities through their Pay It Forward scheme. “Jolly Good Causes responded to our request for help in filling charity marathon places at very short notice. They quickly got a press release together… hugely increasing the exposure we got for this important fundraising event.” - Simon Halsey, Founder of Little Gems. Individuals, businesses and larger charities cover the cost of one of the Jolly Good Causes stand alone services, ranging in price from £120 to £740. Once purchased, the service will be listed on the ‘notice board’ page on their website, and will remain available until it is redeemed by a qualifying charity (those with an income of less than £100,000 per year). Do you (or an organisation you know of) offer small charities pro-bono support? Let us know the details in the comments below! Found this blog post useful? Why not try these by the same author  3 Tips on How To Tell Your Charity Story on Instagram5 free tools to use to share your organisation's story 
    6600 Posted by Nisha Kotecha
  • You cannot be an expert in everything, but staff and volunteers at small charities often feel like they need to be, as they don’t have the budget to hire experts when they need them. Getting pro-bono support can be a huge help to a campaign or project, but finding the time to actually find this free expertise can be off-putting.   Here are three organisations providing pro-bono support that you should bookmark, so when the time comes you will know exactly where to look: LawWorks LawWorks is a charity working in England and Wales to connect volunteer lawyers with people in need of legal advice. Their Not-For-Profits Programme gives free legal advice to small not-for-profit organisations on a wide range of issues. These can include drafting a contract, reviewing a lease, updating a constitution/articles, or clarifying rights in a commercial dispute. The application process is simple: check your organisation is eligible, if it is you then need to fill in an online application form and send over your accounts. Once an application is approved, LawWorks try to find a volunteer to help you within a few weeks. Pimp My Cause Pimp my Cause is a web based platform bringing good causes in need of professional marketing support together with professional experts who are able to contribute this expertise for free. “Kay did a fantastic technical graphic for our small charity to use on the new website we are designing. Hughes syndrome is a blood clotting disorder that can affect any part of the body, so we wanted to have a clear image to show patient possible danger areas. Kay came to our rescue and produced a brilliant, clear graphic which our web designers are very happy to use. She also did it in record time and I feel a bit guilty that we won't be in a position to use it until the website launch in autumn. Our charity and, no doubt, patients in the future are truly grateful for Kay's expertise and time - thank you :) ” - Hughes Syndrome Foundation Whether you would like help on a new website design, a marketing campaign or a new logo, Pimp My Cause can help you find the expert you need. The process is simple – Register for free on the Pimp My Cause website, create a profile for your cause, then create an advert for the help you want. You can then search for volunteer experts and send them a message to see if they can help you, and you might even get experts getting in touch with you to offer their support. Jolly Good Causes Jolly Good Causes is a social enterprise offering pro-bono marketing support to small charities through their Pay It Forward scheme. “Jolly Good Causes responded to our request for help in filling charity marathon places at very short notice. They quickly got a press release together… hugely increasing the exposure we got for this important fundraising event.” - Simon Halsey, Founder of Little Gems. Individuals, businesses and larger charities cover the cost of one of the Jolly Good Causes stand alone services, ranging in price from £120 to £740. Once purchased, the service will be listed on the ‘notice board’ page on their website, and will remain available until it is redeemed by a qualifying charity (those with an income of less than £100,000 per year). Do you (or an organisation you know of) offer small charities pro-bono support? Let us know the details in the comments below! Found this blog post useful? Why not try these by the same author  3 Tips on How To Tell Your Charity Story on Instagram5 free tools to use to share your organisation's story 
    Nov 07, 2016 6600