User's Tags

Lewis Garland 's Entries

7 blogs
  • 28 Mar 2017
    The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    1448 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    Mar 28, 2017 1448
  • 19 Dec 2016
    On 16th December, to coincide with Local Charities Day, we released our second annual Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report. Using data from a survey of 598 local charity representatives carried out of the summer, this report provides a fascinating insight into the state of the local voluntary sector as we approach 2017. The last year has seen a continued escalation in demand for the services of local charities. Coupled with ongoing volatility in the funding landscape, this has left many groups fearful for their long term survival. The report finds that: Just 46% of local charities are confident they will be able to sustain themselves over the next five years. 67% of groups were still predicting stagnation or a downturn in their financial position over the coming year. 78% of groups predict an increase in demand over the coming year, of these groups just 18% feel that they are sufficiently resourced to meet this demand. Reductions in staff numbers pose a  serious problem, impacting on the continuity of services and affecting overall skill levels. 76% of respondents had seen a reduction of staff over the last year. 60% of respondents know of one or more local groups that have been forced to close in the last year. 77% of charities do not believe that they have the skills to run a successful fundraising campaign. Download the Full Report Here We conclude our report by laying out a number of recommendations for the coming year and beyond. We are particularly concerned about the urgent need to bring sustainable funding sources in the sector and to address the continued overreliance on under or unskilled staff. We hope that the results of this report will not only inform our own work over the coming year but also inspire other stakeholders in government, business and civil society to tackle the challenges facing the local voluntary sector.    
    4781 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • On 16th December, to coincide with Local Charities Day, we released our second annual Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report. Using data from a survey of 598 local charity representatives carried out of the summer, this report provides a fascinating insight into the state of the local voluntary sector as we approach 2017. The last year has seen a continued escalation in demand for the services of local charities. Coupled with ongoing volatility in the funding landscape, this has left many groups fearful for their long term survival. The report finds that: Just 46% of local charities are confident they will be able to sustain themselves over the next five years. 67% of groups were still predicting stagnation or a downturn in their financial position over the coming year. 78% of groups predict an increase in demand over the coming year, of these groups just 18% feel that they are sufficiently resourced to meet this demand. Reductions in staff numbers pose a  serious problem, impacting on the continuity of services and affecting overall skill levels. 76% of respondents had seen a reduction of staff over the last year. 60% of respondents know of one or more local groups that have been forced to close in the last year. 77% of charities do not believe that they have the skills to run a successful fundraising campaign. Download the Full Report Here We conclude our report by laying out a number of recommendations for the coming year and beyond. We are particularly concerned about the urgent need to bring sustainable funding sources in the sector and to address the continued overreliance on under or unskilled staff. We hope that the results of this report will not only inform our own work over the coming year but also inspire other stakeholders in government, business and civil society to tackle the challenges facing the local voluntary sector.    
    Dec 19, 2016 4781
  • 20 Sep 2016
    Welsh electro-pop musician Bright Light Bright Light aka Rod Thomas, recently became an ambassador for Localgiving. It has been an exciting and hectic few months for Rod including an appearance on The Graham Norton Show, a support slot for Take That and the release of his third album, Choreography. While in London, Rod swung by for a chat. During our conversation Rod explained why he feels so passionately about grassroots charities, how his friendship with Elton John has influenced his desire to ‘give back’ and his experience of growing up in South Wales as a young artist. Can you sum your incredible year up in 3 words? “Amazing, Brilliant and Exhausting” What makes you so passionate about grassroots charities and community groups? “It’s really cool to be involved in something that isn’t just music based – as well as music based. Getting involved with Localgiving is really nice because you get to think about the real world outside of music which is a really refreshing change. Nobody knows what a community needs more than the people within that community, so grassroots charities are very important. It is people addressing specific needs within a specific location and trying to improve things from the bottom up When I was growing up I didn’t feel connected to places like London or New York or even really Britain generally because it felt like such a small part of the world. It was south Wales and a lot of the talk of what was happening in culture or education or finance was very localised. So I think that having charities that really focus on localised operations and localised problems is important”. You  are friends with Elton John, one of Music’s leading philanthropists. How has he influenced you? “It is really inspiring seeing someone who is one of the busiest musicians in the world and one of the most successful musicians in the world also finding as much time as he possibly can to raise awareness and raise money for charities. I think this is so incredible and I think that’s something that very very few people make the time to do when potentially they’ve got a platform to do that.” If you could set up a charity in your home town of Neath what would it do? “It would probably be something quite arts based, particularly focussing on business skills. When I was growing up people weren’t really taught about ways they could make the arts into a sustainable career or even an option. I always thought that music would be alongside a job and be a labour of love. I think being taught younger about how to make long-term plans would really help a lot of people to have a feeling that there is support and possibility for their ambitions because a lot of talent goes to waste because people just don’t know how to translate that talent into success.” Why should people support local charities? “Whether you like it or not you are always thinking about your locale and your neighbourhood, you town, your city, your friends… or at least you should be. So whatever you can do to support people within that immediate network is really important Localgiving is an excellent opportunity to do something small that makes a big difference!” Find out more about Bright Light Bright Light, including his music and his work with Localgiving by following him on twitter @Brightlightx2 and facebook.  And why not take this opportunity to find a charity near you?    
    1293 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Welsh electro-pop musician Bright Light Bright Light aka Rod Thomas, recently became an ambassador for Localgiving. It has been an exciting and hectic few months for Rod including an appearance on The Graham Norton Show, a support slot for Take That and the release of his third album, Choreography. While in London, Rod swung by for a chat. During our conversation Rod explained why he feels so passionately about grassroots charities, how his friendship with Elton John has influenced his desire to ‘give back’ and his experience of growing up in South Wales as a young artist. Can you sum your incredible year up in 3 words? “Amazing, Brilliant and Exhausting” What makes you so passionate about grassroots charities and community groups? “It’s really cool to be involved in something that isn’t just music based – as well as music based. Getting involved with Localgiving is really nice because you get to think about the real world outside of music which is a really refreshing change. Nobody knows what a community needs more than the people within that community, so grassroots charities are very important. It is people addressing specific needs within a specific location and trying to improve things from the bottom up When I was growing up I didn’t feel connected to places like London or New York or even really Britain generally because it felt like such a small part of the world. It was south Wales and a lot of the talk of what was happening in culture or education or finance was very localised. So I think that having charities that really focus on localised operations and localised problems is important”. You  are friends with Elton John, one of Music’s leading philanthropists. How has he influenced you? “It is really inspiring seeing someone who is one of the busiest musicians in the world and one of the most successful musicians in the world also finding as much time as he possibly can to raise awareness and raise money for charities. I think this is so incredible and I think that’s something that very very few people make the time to do when potentially they’ve got a platform to do that.” If you could set up a charity in your home town of Neath what would it do? “It would probably be something quite arts based, particularly focussing on business skills. When I was growing up people weren’t really taught about ways they could make the arts into a sustainable career or even an option. I always thought that music would be alongside a job and be a labour of love. I think being taught younger about how to make long-term plans would really help a lot of people to have a feeling that there is support and possibility for their ambitions because a lot of talent goes to waste because people just don’t know how to translate that talent into success.” Why should people support local charities? “Whether you like it or not you are always thinking about your locale and your neighbourhood, you town, your city, your friends… or at least you should be. So whatever you can do to support people within that immediate network is really important Localgiving is an excellent opportunity to do something small that makes a big difference!” Find out more about Bright Light Bright Light, including his music and his work with Localgiving by following him on twitter @Brightlightx2 and facebook.  And why not take this opportunity to find a charity near you?    
    Sep 20, 2016 1293
  • 23 Aug 2016
    Localgiving has recently released Striking a Match: Incentivised Giving Report 2016. In recent years we have been exploring incentivisation as a way to engage people with their local charities and community groups. In 2015 we gathered these ideas into a coherent calendar programme for the first time. Over the year we ran six match fund campaigns featuring a range of different incentives to encourage donations. These included 1:1 match funding, ‘randomised’ match funding and fundraiser competitions. Striking a Match compares and contrasts these Incentivised Giving Campaigns. Using donation data and donor feedback, this report looks at the impact of each campaign on the overall amount raised; charity and donor participation rates; donation size and frequency; donor sentiment and retention.  This report provides an insight into how financial incentives affect people’s donation decisions. The findings show that different incentives – ranging from match funding to competition prizes – can be used to engage supporters in charitable causes, as well as stimulating higher, more frequent donations. The report finds that: The vast majority of donor survey respondents see campaign incentives as a crucial factor in their decision to donate. In the February 2015 #GiveMe5 survey 83.4% of respondents said that match funding had influenced their decision “a lot” or was the “only reason” that they had donated. Donor surveys show a clear, positive correlation between the likelihood of a donation being matched and the amount donors are willing to donate. Deterministic match funds (in which donations are guaranteed to be matched) see the highest participation levels, but require substantial initial investment in terms of match funding.  Competitions increase the average donation size and provide the best leverage for campaign funders, but show lower participation rates amongst charities. Download the full PDF report Our next national match fund campaign, Grow Your Tenner 2016, will be launching on 18th October and will run for a month or until the match fund runs out. During this campaign Localgiving will be matching monthly donations of up to £10 given to our members for up to three months. Why not take a look at our campaign page to find out how you and your charity can benefit.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmentHow Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity
    1210 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Localgiving has recently released Striking a Match: Incentivised Giving Report 2016. In recent years we have been exploring incentivisation as a way to engage people with their local charities and community groups. In 2015 we gathered these ideas into a coherent calendar programme for the first time. Over the year we ran six match fund campaigns featuring a range of different incentives to encourage donations. These included 1:1 match funding, ‘randomised’ match funding and fundraiser competitions. Striking a Match compares and contrasts these Incentivised Giving Campaigns. Using donation data and donor feedback, this report looks at the impact of each campaign on the overall amount raised; charity and donor participation rates; donation size and frequency; donor sentiment and retention.  This report provides an insight into how financial incentives affect people’s donation decisions. The findings show that different incentives – ranging from match funding to competition prizes – can be used to engage supporters in charitable causes, as well as stimulating higher, more frequent donations. The report finds that: The vast majority of donor survey respondents see campaign incentives as a crucial factor in their decision to donate. In the February 2015 #GiveMe5 survey 83.4% of respondents said that match funding had influenced their decision “a lot” or was the “only reason” that they had donated. Donor surveys show a clear, positive correlation between the likelihood of a donation being matched and the amount donors are willing to donate. Deterministic match funds (in which donations are guaranteed to be matched) see the highest participation levels, but require substantial initial investment in terms of match funding.  Competitions increase the average donation size and provide the best leverage for campaign funders, but show lower participation rates amongst charities. Download the full PDF report Our next national match fund campaign, Grow Your Tenner 2016, will be launching on 18th October and will run for a month or until the match fund runs out. During this campaign Localgiving will be matching monthly donations of up to £10 given to our members for up to three months. Why not take a look at our campaign page to find out how you and your charity can benefit.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmentHow Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity
    Aug 23, 2016 1210
  • 13 Jun 2016
    Small Charity Week is here!  Over 95% of Localgiving’s members are small or micro charities.  We know better than anyone the inherent value of grassroots groups.   We are in the privileged position of hearing and seeing the positive impact that these groups make on their communities – every day in countless ways.   This morning alone I have been talking to a Darlington based group set up to save their local bowling green, a Swindon charity using theatre to change attitudes to refugees and a fans-owned football club in Scarborough. These are hugely different initiatives, with hugely different missions. What they all have in common however is an acute understanding of the needs of their communities and a genuine passion for improving the lives of those around them. Small Charity Week is about getting these small, local groups the exposure and acclaim they deserve.   So, how can you get involved? 1)      Find a small charity near you and spread the word about their cause and services.  Its easy to find a group in your area on Localgiving.org. Once you’ve found a group that inspires you, why not inspire your friends or colleagues too. Search for a Charity  2)      Donate! We’re running a #GiveMe5 match fund on Fundraising Day - Thursday the 16th June. We will be doubling 1,000 x £5 donations made through localgiving.org on the day. Our last #GiveMe5 campaign, held on Giving Tuesday 2015, raised over £36k for 548 charities in 24 hours.  Can you spare a fiver to support that inspirational group you just found? Small charities need your support. 3)      Look ahead -  Small charity week is about far more than 7 fun filled days. Think about what you can do to help grassroots charities in future. Can you offer your skills through volunteering? Could you provide ongoing financial support by setting up a direct debit? Do you know other people who would be interested in the work of the charity?   Our advice for small charity week is simple: discover, donate, and inspire!    Image (top SNAP- Special Needs and Parents, bottom  North Wilts Holiday Club for Children & Young People with Special Needs)   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    1202 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Small Charity Week is here!  Over 95% of Localgiving’s members are small or micro charities.  We know better than anyone the inherent value of grassroots groups.   We are in the privileged position of hearing and seeing the positive impact that these groups make on their communities – every day in countless ways.   This morning alone I have been talking to a Darlington based group set up to save their local bowling green, a Swindon charity using theatre to change attitudes to refugees and a fans-owned football club in Scarborough. These are hugely different initiatives, with hugely different missions. What they all have in common however is an acute understanding of the needs of their communities and a genuine passion for improving the lives of those around them. Small Charity Week is about getting these small, local groups the exposure and acclaim they deserve.   So, how can you get involved? 1)      Find a small charity near you and spread the word about their cause and services.  Its easy to find a group in your area on Localgiving.org. Once you’ve found a group that inspires you, why not inspire your friends or colleagues too. Search for a Charity  2)      Donate! We’re running a #GiveMe5 match fund on Fundraising Day - Thursday the 16th June. We will be doubling 1,000 x £5 donations made through localgiving.org on the day. Our last #GiveMe5 campaign, held on Giving Tuesday 2015, raised over £36k for 548 charities in 24 hours.  Can you spare a fiver to support that inspirational group you just found? Small charities need your support. 3)      Look ahead -  Small charity week is about far more than 7 fun filled days. Think about what you can do to help grassroots charities in future. Can you offer your skills through volunteering? Could you provide ongoing financial support by setting up a direct debit? Do you know other people who would be interested in the work of the charity?   Our advice for small charity week is simple: discover, donate, and inspire!    Image (top SNAP- Special Needs and Parents, bottom  North Wilts Holiday Club for Children & Young People with Special Needs)   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    Jun 13, 2016 1202
  • 25 Jan 2016
    Since founding Localgiving in 2009, Marcelle Speller OBE, has fought to ensure that grassroots charities and community groups from across the UK are given the recognition and support they need and deserve. We are delighted therefore to see Marcelle’s work once again endorsed through her inclusion in this year’s Debrett’s 500. For almost 250 years Debrett’s has given the spotlight to people of influence and achievement in British society. Each year Debrett’s 500 is compiled by independent panels of specialists. The 2016 list sees Marcelle included in the UK's twenty most influential “Philanthropists and activists” alongside such esteemed and inspirational people as Malala Yousafzai, Lord Sainsbury, Prince Harry and Layla Hussain. Steve Mallinson, Localgiving's Chief Executive, has said:  "It is brilliant to see our founder and Chairman  recognised in  Debrett's 500. It is a privilege to work alongside Marcelle and to witness her drive and passion on a daily basis. We hope that that this will inspire more people to find out about the local charities and causes that Marcelle cares so much about".    
    1314 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Since founding Localgiving in 2009, Marcelle Speller OBE, has fought to ensure that grassroots charities and community groups from across the UK are given the recognition and support they need and deserve. We are delighted therefore to see Marcelle’s work once again endorsed through her inclusion in this year’s Debrett’s 500. For almost 250 years Debrett’s has given the spotlight to people of influence and achievement in British society. Each year Debrett’s 500 is compiled by independent panels of specialists. The 2016 list sees Marcelle included in the UK's twenty most influential “Philanthropists and activists” alongside such esteemed and inspirational people as Malala Yousafzai, Lord Sainsbury, Prince Harry and Layla Hussain. Steve Mallinson, Localgiving's Chief Executive, has said:  "It is brilliant to see our founder and Chairman  recognised in  Debrett's 500. It is a privilege to work alongside Marcelle and to witness her drive and passion on a daily basis. We hope that that this will inspire more people to find out about the local charities and causes that Marcelle cares so much about".    
    Jan 25, 2016 1314
  • 20 Oct 2015
    This year’s #GivingTuesday is taking place on December 1st 2015 #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving, now in its fourth year. Across the world, from Los Angeles to Anglesey, people will be coming together in the spirit of giving. Whether donating, volunteering or simply lending your voice, this is a real opportunity for you to make a difference. Support a local charity on the day, and you could have an even bigger impact. Our recent study into the local voluntary sector has revealed that local groups are dangerously overstretched and seldom receive the support they need. 81% of local charities are facing an increase in demand for services, but only 15% of those feel sufficiently resourced to deal with a continued escalation  Shockingly, just 47% of local groups confident that they will be able to stay financially afloat over the next 5 years.   Together we can be the catalyst to change this! As a little incentive for supporters and fundraisers to get involved with this year’s #GivingTuesday, Localgiving will be running a match fund campaign on the day. Through #GiveMe5, we will be matching 1000 X £5 donations made to Localgiving groups. On last year’s #GivingTuesday, our Triple Tenner Tuesday match fund raised £75,736 for small, local charities in just 24 hours. There are various ways that you can get involved: Spread the word using the hashtag #GiveMe5 - and why not liven your campaign up with Selfie (see right) Search for a charity on Localgiving by region and cause and make a £5 donation on #GivingTuesday (December 1st 2015) for the chance to have your donation doubled Encourage local groups that you care about to get involved with the campaign. Remember, If you are already a member you can refer other groups using your unique link. Once they are online we'll donate £10 to your cause - plus another £10 to theirs! We look forward to seeing your #GiveMe5 selfies flooding in!
    2470 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This year’s #GivingTuesday is taking place on December 1st 2015 #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving, now in its fourth year. Across the world, from Los Angeles to Anglesey, people will be coming together in the spirit of giving. Whether donating, volunteering or simply lending your voice, this is a real opportunity for you to make a difference. Support a local charity on the day, and you could have an even bigger impact. Our recent study into the local voluntary sector has revealed that local groups are dangerously overstretched and seldom receive the support they need. 81% of local charities are facing an increase in demand for services, but only 15% of those feel sufficiently resourced to deal with a continued escalation  Shockingly, just 47% of local groups confident that they will be able to stay financially afloat over the next 5 years.   Together we can be the catalyst to change this! As a little incentive for supporters and fundraisers to get involved with this year’s #GivingTuesday, Localgiving will be running a match fund campaign on the day. Through #GiveMe5, we will be matching 1000 X £5 donations made to Localgiving groups. On last year’s #GivingTuesday, our Triple Tenner Tuesday match fund raised £75,736 for small, local charities in just 24 hours. There are various ways that you can get involved: Spread the word using the hashtag #GiveMe5 - and why not liven your campaign up with Selfie (see right) Search for a charity on Localgiving by region and cause and make a £5 donation on #GivingTuesday (December 1st 2015) for the chance to have your donation doubled Encourage local groups that you care about to get involved with the campaign. Remember, If you are already a member you can refer other groups using your unique link. Once they are online we'll donate £10 to your cause - plus another £10 to theirs! We look forward to seeing your #GiveMe5 selfies flooding in!
    Oct 20, 2015 2470