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Lewis Garland 's Entries

19 blogs
  • 12 Jul 2019
    It is a known fact that the UK has seen a spike in youth violence, particularly knife crime, over the last couple of years. Sadly, the news has become all too familiar: another grinning picture of a lost kid, another grieving parent’s pleas for the violence to end, another youth worker discussing the impact of local government cuts, another politician with a soundbite playing to his or her agenda. Most of us, read these ‘by-numbers’ articles, feel a pang of sadness, anger or guilt – and then move on with our lives, much as we do when we hear about a famine or war in the global south. Sometimes however the reality of the situation is driven home a little harder. Last year a 16 year old was shot-dead one road from my house in Tulse Hill in South London. On this occasion it was impossible to ignore the deafening-silence of the neighbours and friends stood behind the police tape. Then, just a matter of days ago, my friend’s son, who is 15, was threatened at knife-point and interrogated about whether he had any gang affiliation. This happened just yards from his house - in broad day-light. My friend’s voice trembled as she told me that, what made this so hard was that this had happened in the very place that both she and her son had been brought up – the place they call home. Nowhere felt safe anymore. Like thousands of young people in London and across the UK, my friend’s son is now approaching adulthood in a state of fear and faces stark questions around how to remain safe in this environment. Of course, there is not single cause or single solution. The government, police and schools undoubtedly have huge roles to play, particularly when it comes to addressing the underling socio-economic issues at play. However, in many cases it is the people living and working in the affected communities who have the best understanding of the dynamics on the ground and therefore the best solutions for tackling these issues at the local level. At Localgiving we work with grassroots organisations across the UK who work tirelessly, to tackle youth and gang violence and its multiple causes. Many of these groups have been set up by people who have first-hand experience of these issues, some by parents of victims and some by former gang members themselves. These groups are embedded in their communities and are therefore, not only acutely aware of the specific dynamics of the situation in their area, but also find it far easier to gain access to, and the trust of those they aim to help. This is a particularly important factor, given that many of the communities most adversely affected by the uptick in youth violence have also experienced a break-down in trust with police and local authorities. The type and level of support offered by these grassroots groups varies considerably. Many services are tailored to the specific needs of the young people they work with and communities they work in. Some groups provide peer-to-peer support, some provide safe spaces for healing, some help secure safe, stable housing and provide their young people with training and education opportunities. One thing they all offer however is hope. Hope that there is a way out of the current cycle of violence and evidence of the tangible difference that people can make in their own communities – even when faced with the most painful and seemingly intractable social problems. Below are some of the amazing groups on Localgiving who work to tackle youth violence and its causes.  Jags Foundation (Croyden, London) Real Action (Kensington, London) St. Matthews Project (Lambeth, London) Aik Saath - Together As One (Slough) The New Cross Gate Trust – “carrying knives costs lives” campaign (London) Safe (Oxford) Newark Youth London (Newark London) Prospex (Islington, London) Copenhagen Youth Project (Islington, London) Lambeth Action for Youth (Lambeth, London) C2C Social Action (Northampton) Fitzrovia Youth In Action (Camden, London) Fast Project (Battersea, London) Sports4Health CIC (London) The Reasons Why Foundation (London) The Jan Trust (Haringay, London)
    284 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • It is a known fact that the UK has seen a spike in youth violence, particularly knife crime, over the last couple of years. Sadly, the news has become all too familiar: another grinning picture of a lost kid, another grieving parent’s pleas for the violence to end, another youth worker discussing the impact of local government cuts, another politician with a soundbite playing to his or her agenda. Most of us, read these ‘by-numbers’ articles, feel a pang of sadness, anger or guilt – and then move on with our lives, much as we do when we hear about a famine or war in the global south. Sometimes however the reality of the situation is driven home a little harder. Last year a 16 year old was shot-dead one road from my house in Tulse Hill in South London. On this occasion it was impossible to ignore the deafening-silence of the neighbours and friends stood behind the police tape. Then, just a matter of days ago, my friend’s son, who is 15, was threatened at knife-point and interrogated about whether he had any gang affiliation. This happened just yards from his house - in broad day-light. My friend’s voice trembled as she told me that, what made this so hard was that this had happened in the very place that both she and her son had been brought up – the place they call home. Nowhere felt safe anymore. Like thousands of young people in London and across the UK, my friend’s son is now approaching adulthood in a state of fear and faces stark questions around how to remain safe in this environment. Of course, there is not single cause or single solution. The government, police and schools undoubtedly have huge roles to play, particularly when it comes to addressing the underling socio-economic issues at play. However, in many cases it is the people living and working in the affected communities who have the best understanding of the dynamics on the ground and therefore the best solutions for tackling these issues at the local level. At Localgiving we work with grassroots organisations across the UK who work tirelessly, to tackle youth and gang violence and its multiple causes. Many of these groups have been set up by people who have first-hand experience of these issues, some by parents of victims and some by former gang members themselves. These groups are embedded in their communities and are therefore, not only acutely aware of the specific dynamics of the situation in their area, but also find it far easier to gain access to, and the trust of those they aim to help. This is a particularly important factor, given that many of the communities most adversely affected by the uptick in youth violence have also experienced a break-down in trust with police and local authorities. The type and level of support offered by these grassroots groups varies considerably. Many services are tailored to the specific needs of the young people they work with and communities they work in. Some groups provide peer-to-peer support, some provide safe spaces for healing, some help secure safe, stable housing and provide their young people with training and education opportunities. One thing they all offer however is hope. Hope that there is a way out of the current cycle of violence and evidence of the tangible difference that people can make in their own communities – even when faced with the most painful and seemingly intractable social problems. Below are some of the amazing groups on Localgiving who work to tackle youth violence and its causes.  Jags Foundation (Croyden, London) Real Action (Kensington, London) St. Matthews Project (Lambeth, London) Aik Saath - Together As One (Slough) The New Cross Gate Trust – “carrying knives costs lives” campaign (London) Safe (Oxford) Newark Youth London (Newark London) Prospex (Islington, London) Copenhagen Youth Project (Islington, London) Lambeth Action for Youth (Lambeth, London) C2C Social Action (Northampton) Fitzrovia Youth In Action (Camden, London) Fast Project (Battersea, London) Sports4Health CIC (London) The Reasons Why Foundation (London) The Jan Trust (Haringay, London)
    Jul 12, 2019 284
  • 13 Jun 2019
      NB. This blog was written by a colleague and friend who wishes to remain anonymous. The words “queer” and “Muslim” are a paradoxical association. You cannot be a good Muslim and be queer. Or partake in queer culture without giving up what is, effectively, an essential part of your identity and sense of self. Or that is what I thought. Growing up in Italy, a country where being brown and wearing a headscarf are no easy task, I spent way too much energy trying to prove to my peers that I was one of the “good ones”. Between acing school to demonstrate that I was just as clever, and being extremely hyper-aware of how I presented myself (be it the packed lunch I took to school, the clothes I wore, the languages I spoke), little energy was left to reckon with my sexuality. Along with this came the religious guilt, that overwhelming feeling that, by admitting what deep down I knew is true, I would let God down, I would fail at being a good Muslim and might as well throw the towel on all of my efforts. Part of this was certainly the lack of visible role models. I didn’t know any bisexual, brown, Muslim women. I thought I was alone, and I thought I was - quite literally - committing a crime. The guilt was unbearable. Sometimes it still is. I debated for years about whether I could reconcile my faith and my sexuality, and for a long time it felt like one of the two had to go. As I am getting older, however, and gaining more self-awareness and accountability, I am opening up to the possibility that the two – my faith and my sexuality – are not a zero-sum game. I am slowly learning to let go of the guilt, and to treat myself with kindness and compassion, just as I would treat any other friend on the same boat. If you or someone you know is going through a similar experience (regardless of religion, faith, or lack thereof), here’s what teenage me desperately needed to hear: You are not wrong or broken. The only thing you’ve done is to love other human beings. That couldn’t possibly be wrong, right? Faith is not black and white. Faith is at your service. It is meant to inspire and guide you. You are absolutely not alone. There are SO MANY PEOPLE that feel just like you! Related to the above, the internet is great. Do your googles. Find your tribe. There is no such thing as “queer culture”. Never feel like you have to suppress your faith and/or culture to conform to what a queer person is supposed to look and act like. Related to the above, being a “culturally diverse” member of the LGBT+ community can sometimes be seen as a form of “bravery” (the amount of “you are not like other Muslims” comments I receive, oh my!). Beware that. That is yet another form of othering! Localgiving is proud to work with LGBTQI+ groups from across the UK. There are many ways you can get involved with these groups - be it as a volunteer, beneficiary, donor or fundraiser. Why not find a group near you now? Here are just a few of the groups we work with: The Proud Trust Gendered Intelligence  The Kite Project  HERE NI  Q- Alliance  Viva LGBT+   Norwich Pride Norfolk LGBT+ Project Coventry Pride - Pride Cymru
    874 Posted by Lewis Garland
  •   NB. This blog was written by a colleague and friend who wishes to remain anonymous. The words “queer” and “Muslim” are a paradoxical association. You cannot be a good Muslim and be queer. Or partake in queer culture without giving up what is, effectively, an essential part of your identity and sense of self. Or that is what I thought. Growing up in Italy, a country where being brown and wearing a headscarf are no easy task, I spent way too much energy trying to prove to my peers that I was one of the “good ones”. Between acing school to demonstrate that I was just as clever, and being extremely hyper-aware of how I presented myself (be it the packed lunch I took to school, the clothes I wore, the languages I spoke), little energy was left to reckon with my sexuality. Along with this came the religious guilt, that overwhelming feeling that, by admitting what deep down I knew is true, I would let God down, I would fail at being a good Muslim and might as well throw the towel on all of my efforts. Part of this was certainly the lack of visible role models. I didn’t know any bisexual, brown, Muslim women. I thought I was alone, and I thought I was - quite literally - committing a crime. The guilt was unbearable. Sometimes it still is. I debated for years about whether I could reconcile my faith and my sexuality, and for a long time it felt like one of the two had to go. As I am getting older, however, and gaining more self-awareness and accountability, I am opening up to the possibility that the two – my faith and my sexuality – are not a zero-sum game. I am slowly learning to let go of the guilt, and to treat myself with kindness and compassion, just as I would treat any other friend on the same boat. If you or someone you know is going through a similar experience (regardless of religion, faith, or lack thereof), here’s what teenage me desperately needed to hear: You are not wrong or broken. The only thing you’ve done is to love other human beings. That couldn’t possibly be wrong, right? Faith is not black and white. Faith is at your service. It is meant to inspire and guide you. You are absolutely not alone. There are SO MANY PEOPLE that feel just like you! Related to the above, the internet is great. Do your googles. Find your tribe. There is no such thing as “queer culture”. Never feel like you have to suppress your faith and/or culture to conform to what a queer person is supposed to look and act like. Related to the above, being a “culturally diverse” member of the LGBT+ community can sometimes be seen as a form of “bravery” (the amount of “you are not like other Muslims” comments I receive, oh my!). Beware that. That is yet another form of othering! Localgiving is proud to work with LGBTQI+ groups from across the UK. There are many ways you can get involved with these groups - be it as a volunteer, beneficiary, donor or fundraiser. Why not find a group near you now? Here are just a few of the groups we work with: The Proud Trust Gendered Intelligence  The Kite Project  HERE NI  Q- Alliance  Viva LGBT+   Norwich Pride Norfolk LGBT+ Project Coventry Pride - Pride Cymru
    Jun 13, 2019 874
  • 05 Jul 2018
    Amid the special edition rainbow bank cards and coffee cups, it is very easy to forget that today’s Pride celebrations have their roots in the Stonewall riots and the wider fight for justice for LGBTQI+people. There is no doubt that there have been incredible strides forward for LGBTQI+ rights over the last quarter of a century  – indeed the very fact that is has become so beneficial for big business to show its support for Pride is testament to how far we have come. However, we must not be fooled into believing the fight is in any way won. Homosexuality remains illegal in 74 countries, while hate crime and day-to-day prejudice remain issues even in the most progressive countries. Within the UK, one particularly pressing issue is the fight to protect the rights and ensure the wellbeing of LGBTQI+ asylum seekers. This week, I spoke to Leila Zadah of the UK  Lesbian & Gay Immigration Group (UKLGIG) about their work to support LGBTQI+ asylum seekers and  advocate for their needs and rights. What is UKLGIG's mission and what support do you provide to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers?  "Our mission is to support LGBTQI+ through the asylum process. We are the only charity in the UK that provides specialist support services, legal advice and information, and conducts policy and advocacy work. We provide psychosocial and practical support to LGBTQI+ people throughout the asylum process. We also provide specialist legal advice and information. We visit LGBTQI+ people if they are claiming asylum and have been placed in a detention centre. We also advocate for changes in Home Office policy and practice, including an improvement in the quality of decision-making in asylum claims based on sexual orientation or gender identity, an end to the detention of LGBTQI+ people and safer accommodation." How many  LGBTQI+ people seek asylum in the UK per year and where do the majority of these claims come from? "Home Office figures published in November 2018 revealed that around 2,000 people apply for asylum each year because of their sexual orientation. Most applications are from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nigeria. The Home Office data did not include claims on the basis of gender identity but they have committee to publishing that data in future." Why do LGBTQI+ people need specific support through the asylum process? In what way does the UK asylum system  disadvantage LGBTQI+ people? "LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum are invariably highly marginalised in society. They may have been rejected by their families, friends and communities because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. They often wish to avoid places where other people from their home countries are present for fear of discrimination or harassment; and they are not always welcome in LGBTQI+ spaces because of racism or their immigration status. Many experience feelings of profound shame and/or internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia. Many have also experienced psychological, physical or sexual violence. They often have low self-esteem and low confidence, which impact on their ability to present their asylum claims. Most mainstream refugee organisations do not provide specific services to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers or information tailored to their needs. Claiming asylum on the basis of your sexual orientation or gender identity is inherently difficult. To be recognised as a refugee, you have to show that you have a well-founded fear of persecution. If your fear of persecution is based on your sexual orientation or gender identity, you also have to prove that you are lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, trans or intersex. This would be difficult for any person, but it is even harder if you have been trying to hide your sexual orientation or gender identity because your family, society or country won’t accept it and may harm you. It is also very difficult to overcome feelings of shame and internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia to be able to talk about your identity – particularly if any discussion of sexuality is taboo in your culture – to a figure of authority who is going to decide if you can stay in the country. Unfortunately, sometimes asylum decision-makers in the Home Office use stereotypes to try to decide if someone is LGBTQI+. Sometimes they don’t recognise the importance of cultural context. One caseworker in the Home Office once said that to try to establish someone’s sexual orientation they would “look at how they’ve explored their sexuality in a cultural context – reading Oscar Wilde perhaps, films and music”. UKLGIG is releasing a report later this month that looks at the reasons why LGBTQI+ asylum claims are rejected. People can receive it by signing up to our newsletter or following us on social media (see below). People who are seeking asylum are not allowed to work. If they need accommodation, the government will normally provide a shared room in a shared house. LGBTQI+ people in shared asylum accommodation often experience discrimination, harassment and abuse from their housemates.  People who are seeking asylum can also be held in immigration detention centres. LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum find themselves trapped among people who may exhibit the same prejudices and discrimination towards them as people in the country from which they are fleeing. Our joint research with Stonewall, No Safe Refuge, showed that they experience harassment and abuse as a result. Many suffer long-lasting effects on their mental health." What are you doing to celebrate Pride 2018 and can people join you? "We will be marching at Pride in London on Sat 7 July. We also have a joint event the Amnesty UK LGBTI Network and African Rainbow Family at UK Black Pride on Sunday 8 July." How can people support your work in future?  We are always looking for Volunteers and you can Donate Here. If you’d like to be involved in our governance, you can become a Member of UKLGIG. Download a form Here.   People can also: Visit our website Sign up for our newsletter  Follow us on Twitter @uklgig Like our Facebook page 
    2636 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Amid the special edition rainbow bank cards and coffee cups, it is very easy to forget that today’s Pride celebrations have their roots in the Stonewall riots and the wider fight for justice for LGBTQI+people. There is no doubt that there have been incredible strides forward for LGBTQI+ rights over the last quarter of a century  – indeed the very fact that is has become so beneficial for big business to show its support for Pride is testament to how far we have come. However, we must not be fooled into believing the fight is in any way won. Homosexuality remains illegal in 74 countries, while hate crime and day-to-day prejudice remain issues even in the most progressive countries. Within the UK, one particularly pressing issue is the fight to protect the rights and ensure the wellbeing of LGBTQI+ asylum seekers. This week, I spoke to Leila Zadah of the UK  Lesbian & Gay Immigration Group (UKLGIG) about their work to support LGBTQI+ asylum seekers and  advocate for their needs and rights. What is UKLGIG's mission and what support do you provide to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers?  "Our mission is to support LGBTQI+ through the asylum process. We are the only charity in the UK that provides specialist support services, legal advice and information, and conducts policy and advocacy work. We provide psychosocial and practical support to LGBTQI+ people throughout the asylum process. We also provide specialist legal advice and information. We visit LGBTQI+ people if they are claiming asylum and have been placed in a detention centre. We also advocate for changes in Home Office policy and practice, including an improvement in the quality of decision-making in asylum claims based on sexual orientation or gender identity, an end to the detention of LGBTQI+ people and safer accommodation." How many  LGBTQI+ people seek asylum in the UK per year and where do the majority of these claims come from? "Home Office figures published in November 2018 revealed that around 2,000 people apply for asylum each year because of their sexual orientation. Most applications are from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nigeria. The Home Office data did not include claims on the basis of gender identity but they have committee to publishing that data in future." Why do LGBTQI+ people need specific support through the asylum process? In what way does the UK asylum system  disadvantage LGBTQI+ people? "LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum are invariably highly marginalised in society. They may have been rejected by their families, friends and communities because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. They often wish to avoid places where other people from their home countries are present for fear of discrimination or harassment; and they are not always welcome in LGBTQI+ spaces because of racism or their immigration status. Many experience feelings of profound shame and/or internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia. Many have also experienced psychological, physical or sexual violence. They often have low self-esteem and low confidence, which impact on their ability to present their asylum claims. Most mainstream refugee organisations do not provide specific services to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers or information tailored to their needs. Claiming asylum on the basis of your sexual orientation or gender identity is inherently difficult. To be recognised as a refugee, you have to show that you have a well-founded fear of persecution. If your fear of persecution is based on your sexual orientation or gender identity, you also have to prove that you are lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, trans or intersex. This would be difficult for any person, but it is even harder if you have been trying to hide your sexual orientation or gender identity because your family, society or country won’t accept it and may harm you. It is also very difficult to overcome feelings of shame and internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia to be able to talk about your identity – particularly if any discussion of sexuality is taboo in your culture – to a figure of authority who is going to decide if you can stay in the country. Unfortunately, sometimes asylum decision-makers in the Home Office use stereotypes to try to decide if someone is LGBTQI+. Sometimes they don’t recognise the importance of cultural context. One caseworker in the Home Office once said that to try to establish someone’s sexual orientation they would “look at how they’ve explored their sexuality in a cultural context – reading Oscar Wilde perhaps, films and music”. UKLGIG is releasing a report later this month that looks at the reasons why LGBTQI+ asylum claims are rejected. People can receive it by signing up to our newsletter or following us on social media (see below). People who are seeking asylum are not allowed to work. If they need accommodation, the government will normally provide a shared room in a shared house. LGBTQI+ people in shared asylum accommodation often experience discrimination, harassment and abuse from their housemates.  People who are seeking asylum can also be held in immigration detention centres. LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum find themselves trapped among people who may exhibit the same prejudices and discrimination towards them as people in the country from which they are fleeing. Our joint research with Stonewall, No Safe Refuge, showed that they experience harassment and abuse as a result. Many suffer long-lasting effects on their mental health." What are you doing to celebrate Pride 2018 and can people join you? "We will be marching at Pride in London on Sat 7 July. We also have a joint event the Amnesty UK LGBTI Network and African Rainbow Family at UK Black Pride on Sunday 8 July." How can people support your work in future?  We are always looking for Volunteers and you can Donate Here. If you’d like to be involved in our governance, you can become a Member of UKLGIG. Download a form Here.   People can also: Visit our website Sign up for our newsletter  Follow us on Twitter @uklgig Like our Facebook page 
    Jul 05, 2018 2636
  • 14 Mar 2018
      This Saturday (17th March) is St. Patrick’s day. That special time of year that the world comes together to celebrate St. Patrick’s great achievement – the banishment of all snakes from Ireland. Now, let’s not let the little fact that there were never any snakes in Ireland get in the way of a good story shall we ... and, importantly get in the way of a great excuse for a stout or two! It is also, of course, the perfect excuse to celebrate the work of the numerous Irish cultural group and clubs on Localgiving – from Gaelic football teams to Irish language and literature classes. So before you go painting the town green this saturday night, think about making a small donation to one of the many local groups that strive to keep Irish culture alive in the UK for the other 364 days of the year. Here are just a few suggestions: Andersonstown Traditional & Contemporary Music School - Belfast - offers music classes, performances, qualifications & workshops in traditional & contemporary music An Droichead - Belfast - provides Irish language, arts and cultural classes and offers quality affordable childcare and afterschool activities.  Birth Mothers and their Children for Justice N.I - Campaign calling for an Inquiry into former Mother and Baby Home institutions. Raising awareness about the litany of abuses and maltreatment and illegal, non and forged consent adoptions. CAIRDE Teo - Armagh - focuses on micro-business incubation; employment, training and learning opportunities. CAIRDE Teo also promotes the use of the Irish language and works closely with other linguistic and cultural minorities in Armagh to promote multi-culturalism and diversity. Milton Keynes Irish Welfare Support Group – Milton Keynes - holds a weekly lunch club for older Irish people and their friends. The Welfare support group also has an Outreach Worker who offers advice on benefits in both English and Irish. Roger Casements GAA club - Formed in the mid 1950's to enable the Irish community in Coventry to continue enjoying the irish cultural pasttimes of Gaelic football and hurling. Here NI - Belfast - work to build the capacity of lesbian and bisexual women and their families in Northern Ireland. Human Rights Consortium - Belfast - operate to raise awareness and promote the values of human rights in Northern Ireland with a particular focus on the development of a Bill of Rights. St Joseph's GAC Glenavy -Glenavy- provides Gaelic games for all ages and abilities from as young as 4 years old.  The Emerald Centre  - Leicester - works with members of the Irish community in Leicestershire who are most in need. The centre also offers  sport and social facilities and services for  senior citizens, Pragati Asian group, disability groups and creative play. TIR CONAILL HARPS GAC - aim to strengthen communities in Glasgow through the provision of gaelic sports for young people.   
    1894 Posted by Lewis Garland
  •   This Saturday (17th March) is St. Patrick’s day. That special time of year that the world comes together to celebrate St. Patrick’s great achievement – the banishment of all snakes from Ireland. Now, let’s not let the little fact that there were never any snakes in Ireland get in the way of a good story shall we ... and, importantly get in the way of a great excuse for a stout or two! It is also, of course, the perfect excuse to celebrate the work of the numerous Irish cultural group and clubs on Localgiving – from Gaelic football teams to Irish language and literature classes. So before you go painting the town green this saturday night, think about making a small donation to one of the many local groups that strive to keep Irish culture alive in the UK for the other 364 days of the year. Here are just a few suggestions: Andersonstown Traditional & Contemporary Music School - Belfast - offers music classes, performances, qualifications & workshops in traditional & contemporary music An Droichead - Belfast - provides Irish language, arts and cultural classes and offers quality affordable childcare and afterschool activities.  Birth Mothers and their Children for Justice N.I - Campaign calling for an Inquiry into former Mother and Baby Home institutions. Raising awareness about the litany of abuses and maltreatment and illegal, non and forged consent adoptions. CAIRDE Teo - Armagh - focuses on micro-business incubation; employment, training and learning opportunities. CAIRDE Teo also promotes the use of the Irish language and works closely with other linguistic and cultural minorities in Armagh to promote multi-culturalism and diversity. Milton Keynes Irish Welfare Support Group – Milton Keynes - holds a weekly lunch club for older Irish people and their friends. The Welfare support group also has an Outreach Worker who offers advice on benefits in both English and Irish. Roger Casements GAA club - Formed in the mid 1950's to enable the Irish community in Coventry to continue enjoying the irish cultural pasttimes of Gaelic football and hurling. Here NI - Belfast - work to build the capacity of lesbian and bisexual women and their families in Northern Ireland. Human Rights Consortium - Belfast - operate to raise awareness and promote the values of human rights in Northern Ireland with a particular focus on the development of a Bill of Rights. St Joseph's GAC Glenavy -Glenavy- provides Gaelic games for all ages and abilities from as young as 4 years old.  The Emerald Centre  - Leicester - works with members of the Irish community in Leicestershire who are most in need. The centre also offers  sport and social facilities and services for  senior citizens, Pragati Asian group, disability groups and creative play. TIR CONAILL HARPS GAC - aim to strengthen communities in Glasgow through the provision of gaelic sports for young people.   
    Mar 14, 2018 1894
  • 03 Aug 2017
    Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    2377 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    Aug 03, 2017 2377
  • 06 Jul 2017
    This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    2218 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    Jul 06, 2017 2218
  • 12 Apr 2017
    At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    1632 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    Apr 12, 2017 1632
  • 03 Apr 2017
    We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1972 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 03, 2017 1972
  • 06 Feb 2017
    6th – 12th February is Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week 2017 The prevalence of sexual abuse and violence is truly shocking, both at the global and national level: The World Health Organisation estimates that 1 in 3 women will be raped in their lifetime, worldwide. In the UK, 20% of  women aged between 16 and 59 have experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16 85,000 women are raped every year in England and Wales Sadly there is still a huge amount of ignorance and denial around this area – what is particularly worrying is the continued, widespread culture of victims blaming. This awareness week aims to empower those affected by sexual abuse and violence and to send out a  clear message that there is absolutely no situation in which sexual abuse or violence are acceptable in any form. At Localgiving we are proud to work alongside numerous charities and community groups that focus on these issues on a  daily basis – supporting victims of sexual violence and raising awareness of these issues. To recognise Sexual abuse and Sexual violence awareness week (6th -12th Feb 2017) we recommend: A) Joining the conversation on social media using the hashtag #ItsNotOK B) Finding out about a charity in your area and supporting their cause through donating, volunteering or advocating: Search here for a charity near you. To help you we have compiled a list of some of the Localgiving groups working in this area: SARSAS -Somerset and Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support (Somerset) RSVP -Rape and Sexual Violence Project (Birmingham) (RACS)Rotherham Abuse Counselling Service (Rotherham) VOICES - Domestic Abuse Charity (Bath) Behind Closed Doors (Leeds) Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group (Peterborough) SHE UK (Mansfield) The Dash Charity (Slough) Safe and Sound (Derby) Breaking Free female Support Project (Swindon) Survivors' Network (Brighton) Male Survivors Berkshire CIC (Berkshire)      
    2975 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • 6th – 12th February is Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week 2017 The prevalence of sexual abuse and violence is truly shocking, both at the global and national level: The World Health Organisation estimates that 1 in 3 women will be raped in their lifetime, worldwide. In the UK, 20% of  women aged between 16 and 59 have experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16 85,000 women are raped every year in England and Wales Sadly there is still a huge amount of ignorance and denial around this area – what is particularly worrying is the continued, widespread culture of victims blaming. This awareness week aims to empower those affected by sexual abuse and violence and to send out a  clear message that there is absolutely no situation in which sexual abuse or violence are acceptable in any form. At Localgiving we are proud to work alongside numerous charities and community groups that focus on these issues on a  daily basis – supporting victims of sexual violence and raising awareness of these issues. To recognise Sexual abuse and Sexual violence awareness week (6th -12th Feb 2017) we recommend: A) Joining the conversation on social media using the hashtag #ItsNotOK B) Finding out about a charity in your area and supporting their cause through donating, volunteering or advocating: Search here for a charity near you. To help you we have compiled a list of some of the Localgiving groups working in this area: SARSAS -Somerset and Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support (Somerset) RSVP -Rape and Sexual Violence Project (Birmingham) (RACS)Rotherham Abuse Counselling Service (Rotherham) VOICES - Domestic Abuse Charity (Bath) Behind Closed Doors (Leeds) Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group (Peterborough) SHE UK (Mansfield) The Dash Charity (Slough) Safe and Sound (Derby) Breaking Free female Support Project (Swindon) Survivors' Network (Brighton) Male Survivors Berkshire CIC (Berkshire)      
    Feb 06, 2017 2975
  • 29 Sep 2016
    Huge congratulations go to Community Foundation for Calderdale for winning both best fundraising campaign at the Third Sector Awards 2016 and Fundraising Team of the Year: with an income under £5 million at the Charity Times Awards 2016.  On Boxing Day 2015 Storm Eva caused the River Calder to burst it's banks – the subsequent flooding had a devestating impact on businesses and homes across Calderdale. CFFC Immediately responded by launching its Calderdale Flood Fund to help rebuild the community.  Working closely with both local and national media, corporates and voluntary goups, CFFC raised over £2.5 million to support the community in its recovery - £250,000 of which came through its Localgiving appeal page. It was truly inspiring to witness the creativity and hard-work put into this campaign, and to have had the opportunity to play a role in its success.  In March we spoke to Emma Bolger of CFFC about the lessons that other local charities and community groups could take from their extraordinary campaign. Why not read more here!    
    1896 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Huge congratulations go to Community Foundation for Calderdale for winning both best fundraising campaign at the Third Sector Awards 2016 and Fundraising Team of the Year: with an income under £5 million at the Charity Times Awards 2016.  On Boxing Day 2015 Storm Eva caused the River Calder to burst it's banks – the subsequent flooding had a devestating impact on businesses and homes across Calderdale. CFFC Immediately responded by launching its Calderdale Flood Fund to help rebuild the community.  Working closely with both local and national media, corporates and voluntary goups, CFFC raised over £2.5 million to support the community in its recovery - £250,000 of which came through its Localgiving appeal page. It was truly inspiring to witness the creativity and hard-work put into this campaign, and to have had the opportunity to play a role in its success.  In March we spoke to Emma Bolger of CFFC about the lessons that other local charities and community groups could take from their extraordinary campaign. Why not read more here!    
    Sep 29, 2016 1896