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Lewis Garland 's Entries

46 blogs
  • 03 Aug 2017
    Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    2379 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    Aug 03, 2017 2379
  • 06 Jul 2017
    This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    2219 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    Jul 06, 2017 2219
  • 08 Jun 2017
    Tennis2Be is a London based charity dedicated to making tennis an accessible and inclusive sport. Their annual flagship, the ‘Craic Cup’ plays a key part in achieving this mission,  with players of all ages and abilities attending. With this year’s cup just ten days away we caught up with Tennis2Be’s Jay Macpherson. Tell us about the inspiration behind the Craic Cup? What have been your Craic Cup highlights ? “Noticing how more and more people show up every year. There is a real demand for it, enough people to create healthy competition whilst also taking playing levels into account. Visits from our Patron, Rudolph Walker from East Enders,and the Major. The oldest and youngest attendees 3-85 years! At the heart of what we do as a charity is to provide sports and education, we’ve been consistent in involving grassroots organisations and having our ear to the ground each year then I'd call that a highlight reel in itself." What do people have to look forward to this year? “The numbers are getting larger each year, over 80 people attended, giving players the opportunity to play as many people on the day as possible. We've also secured the National Tennis Centre again this year which is a 40 million pound tennis venue built for the pros. If you want to get motivated to play tennis, there is no better place to start than here!” Who can get involved and how? “The beauty of charity events is that absolutely anyone can get involved. All you need is to sign up through our website at www.tennis2be.com . Places are limited and would advise everyone to sign up as soon as they can. We also have special volunteer roles for the Craic Cup where people can gain experience on organising an event of this magnitude, roles in data entry, social media, trusteeship and more." How have you used Localgiving to raise funds for this tournament and your other activities? “Localgiving was an amazing platform that we used initially to try and get donations incentivised by the match funding (London Regional Development Programme). We found Localgiving has much more functionality including appeals and fundraisers, all of which we have explored with fantastic results.This is also thanks to Conor; our point of contact from Localgiving, who was very supportive and patient during the early stages of our understanding, always there when we need both in person and on the phone. The way we use the funding is mainly for providing equipment, reaching out to communities, increasing our programme intake, venue hire, and much more. For example a £45 donation can provide 5 children with a tennis lesson plus educational element. The value of our donations and the ease with which this was done through the platform, says volumes about Localgiving's mission is to strengthen UK communities by safeguarding the sustainability of the local voluntary sector. We really appreciate all the support from our patrons on Localgiving, you guys are awesome!" What recommendations would you give to other groups about how to make the most of their Localgiving page? “A couple of things. Filling out your profile as well as you can to make sure everyone knows exactly where you come from and where you intend to go is absolutely key for charities and organisations wishing to make a difference. You need stand out and provide something unique for your supporters so they can relate to you as closely as possible. An additional recommendation I would give is make use of fundraisers! Even if you get your small team of 3 or 4 individuals to try raising money it adds up insanely quickly. It can also be a ton of fun seeing what people are coming up with on the site, from bold marathons to baths in baked beans, there's a level of magic.” To find out more about the Craic cup or register to take part you can visit: https://www.tennis2be.com/tennis2be-craic-cup-2017  Enjoyed this blog? You may also like: Maximising your fundraising potential New Grant Opportunities from the United Way UK
    2104 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Tennis2Be is a London based charity dedicated to making tennis an accessible and inclusive sport. Their annual flagship, the ‘Craic Cup’ plays a key part in achieving this mission,  with players of all ages and abilities attending. With this year’s cup just ten days away we caught up with Tennis2Be’s Jay Macpherson. Tell us about the inspiration behind the Craic Cup? What have been your Craic Cup highlights ? “Noticing how more and more people show up every year. There is a real demand for it, enough people to create healthy competition whilst also taking playing levels into account. Visits from our Patron, Rudolph Walker from East Enders,and the Major. The oldest and youngest attendees 3-85 years! At the heart of what we do as a charity is to provide sports and education, we’ve been consistent in involving grassroots organisations and having our ear to the ground each year then I'd call that a highlight reel in itself." What do people have to look forward to this year? “The numbers are getting larger each year, over 80 people attended, giving players the opportunity to play as many people on the day as possible. We've also secured the National Tennis Centre again this year which is a 40 million pound tennis venue built for the pros. If you want to get motivated to play tennis, there is no better place to start than here!” Who can get involved and how? “The beauty of charity events is that absolutely anyone can get involved. All you need is to sign up through our website at www.tennis2be.com . Places are limited and would advise everyone to sign up as soon as they can. We also have special volunteer roles for the Craic Cup where people can gain experience on organising an event of this magnitude, roles in data entry, social media, trusteeship and more." How have you used Localgiving to raise funds for this tournament and your other activities? “Localgiving was an amazing platform that we used initially to try and get donations incentivised by the match funding (London Regional Development Programme). We found Localgiving has much more functionality including appeals and fundraisers, all of which we have explored with fantastic results.This is also thanks to Conor; our point of contact from Localgiving, who was very supportive and patient during the early stages of our understanding, always there when we need both in person and on the phone. The way we use the funding is mainly for providing equipment, reaching out to communities, increasing our programme intake, venue hire, and much more. For example a £45 donation can provide 5 children with a tennis lesson plus educational element. The value of our donations and the ease with which this was done through the platform, says volumes about Localgiving's mission is to strengthen UK communities by safeguarding the sustainability of the local voluntary sector. We really appreciate all the support from our patrons on Localgiving, you guys are awesome!" What recommendations would you give to other groups about how to make the most of their Localgiving page? “A couple of things. Filling out your profile as well as you can to make sure everyone knows exactly where you come from and where you intend to go is absolutely key for charities and organisations wishing to make a difference. You need stand out and provide something unique for your supporters so they can relate to you as closely as possible. An additional recommendation I would give is make use of fundraisers! Even if you get your small team of 3 or 4 individuals to try raising money it adds up insanely quickly. It can also be a ton of fun seeing what people are coming up with on the site, from bold marathons to baths in baked beans, there's a level of magic.” To find out more about the Craic cup or register to take part you can visit: https://www.tennis2be.com/tennis2be-craic-cup-2017  Enjoyed this blog? You may also like: Maximising your fundraising potential New Grant Opportunities from the United Way UK
    Jun 08, 2017 2104
  • 19 Apr 2017
    We’ve reached the half way point of Local Hero 2017. Francesca and Rachel, who are raising funds for Friends of Hillside School, have stretched their lead to 16 points raising £1875 in the process  – a strong but by no means unassailable lead. Meanwhile, the chasing pack is becoming increasingly concertinaed. Just 15 points (donations) currently separate 7th to 20th place. Each week we are inspired by the creativity and energy put in by our Local Heroes. This week is no exception. Here are some of our highlights from week 3: Fundraising is an art! Charlotte Clark is creating a bespoke piece of wall art to be exhibited as a permanent fixture in the Clifton Community Arts Centre. She will be incorporating the artwork of local community groups such as schools and charities.  Knit you usual challenge Avid knitters from the "Made to give......with love" group in Plymouth  are  getting sponsored to knit links. These links will be built into a chain which will be measured in September.  All funds go to Jeremiah's Journey. Digital detox  These days detoxes take all types  - for Anoushka Yeoh and friends going without screens for a day is the hardest challenge of all!  Tour de France Force After conquering Kilimanjaro in 2017, Lynda Dean and the wider Sporting Family Change Team are at it again – this time cycling mighty 240 Miles from Bath to Paris!  “…Even if we’re just dancing in the dark…” Julia Fletcher is hosting on an energetic night of glow sticks and Lycra for Basingstoke group,  Helping Hands for the Blind. Fundraising from 10,000 feet above! 6 brave souls will be jumping out of a plane in a tandem skydive for Oxford Cruse, which provides free bereavement support and counselling to people in Oxfordshire. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1703 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’ve reached the half way point of Local Hero 2017. Francesca and Rachel, who are raising funds for Friends of Hillside School, have stretched their lead to 16 points raising £1875 in the process  – a strong but by no means unassailable lead. Meanwhile, the chasing pack is becoming increasingly concertinaed. Just 15 points (donations) currently separate 7th to 20th place. Each week we are inspired by the creativity and energy put in by our Local Heroes. This week is no exception. Here are some of our highlights from week 3: Fundraising is an art! Charlotte Clark is creating a bespoke piece of wall art to be exhibited as a permanent fixture in the Clifton Community Arts Centre. She will be incorporating the artwork of local community groups such as schools and charities.  Knit you usual challenge Avid knitters from the "Made to give......with love" group in Plymouth  are  getting sponsored to knit links. These links will be built into a chain which will be measured in September.  All funds go to Jeremiah's Journey. Digital detox  These days detoxes take all types  - for Anoushka Yeoh and friends going without screens for a day is the hardest challenge of all!  Tour de France Force After conquering Kilimanjaro in 2017, Lynda Dean and the wider Sporting Family Change Team are at it again – this time cycling mighty 240 Miles from Bath to Paris!  “…Even if we’re just dancing in the dark…” Julia Fletcher is hosting on an energetic night of glow sticks and Lycra for Basingstoke group,  Helping Hands for the Blind. Fundraising from 10,000 feet above! 6 brave souls will be jumping out of a plane in a tandem skydive for Oxford Cruse, which provides free bereavement support and counselling to people in Oxfordshire. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 19, 2017 1703
  • 12 Apr 2017
    At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    1633 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    Apr 12, 2017 1633
  • 03 Apr 2017
    We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1972 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 03, 2017 1972
  • 28 Mar 2017
    The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    1842 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    Mar 28, 2017 1842
  • 06 Feb 2017
    6th – 12th February is Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week 2017 The prevalence of sexual abuse and violence is truly shocking, both at the global and national level: The World Health Organisation estimates that 1 in 3 women will be raped in their lifetime, worldwide. In the UK, 20% of  women aged between 16 and 59 have experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16 85,000 women are raped every year in England and Wales Sadly there is still a huge amount of ignorance and denial around this area – what is particularly worrying is the continued, widespread culture of victims blaming. This awareness week aims to empower those affected by sexual abuse and violence and to send out a  clear message that there is absolutely no situation in which sexual abuse or violence are acceptable in any form. At Localgiving we are proud to work alongside numerous charities and community groups that focus on these issues on a  daily basis – supporting victims of sexual violence and raising awareness of these issues. To recognise Sexual abuse and Sexual violence awareness week (6th -12th Feb 2017) we recommend: A) Joining the conversation on social media using the hashtag #ItsNotOK B) Finding out about a charity in your area and supporting their cause through donating, volunteering or advocating: Search here for a charity near you. To help you we have compiled a list of some of the Localgiving groups working in this area: SARSAS -Somerset and Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support (Somerset) RSVP -Rape and Sexual Violence Project (Birmingham) (RACS)Rotherham Abuse Counselling Service (Rotherham) VOICES - Domestic Abuse Charity (Bath) Behind Closed Doors (Leeds) Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group (Peterborough) SHE UK (Mansfield) The Dash Charity (Slough) Safe and Sound (Derby) Breaking Free female Support Project (Swindon) Survivors' Network (Brighton) Male Survivors Berkshire CIC (Berkshire)      
    2976 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • 6th – 12th February is Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week 2017 The prevalence of sexual abuse and violence is truly shocking, both at the global and national level: The World Health Organisation estimates that 1 in 3 women will be raped in their lifetime, worldwide. In the UK, 20% of  women aged between 16 and 59 have experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16 85,000 women are raped every year in England and Wales Sadly there is still a huge amount of ignorance and denial around this area – what is particularly worrying is the continued, widespread culture of victims blaming. This awareness week aims to empower those affected by sexual abuse and violence and to send out a  clear message that there is absolutely no situation in which sexual abuse or violence are acceptable in any form. At Localgiving we are proud to work alongside numerous charities and community groups that focus on these issues on a  daily basis – supporting victims of sexual violence and raising awareness of these issues. To recognise Sexual abuse and Sexual violence awareness week (6th -12th Feb 2017) we recommend: A) Joining the conversation on social media using the hashtag #ItsNotOK B) Finding out about a charity in your area and supporting their cause through donating, volunteering or advocating: Search here for a charity near you. To help you we have compiled a list of some of the Localgiving groups working in this area: SARSAS -Somerset and Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support (Somerset) RSVP -Rape and Sexual Violence Project (Birmingham) (RACS)Rotherham Abuse Counselling Service (Rotherham) VOICES - Domestic Abuse Charity (Bath) Behind Closed Doors (Leeds) Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group (Peterborough) SHE UK (Mansfield) The Dash Charity (Slough) Safe and Sound (Derby) Breaking Free female Support Project (Swindon) Survivors' Network (Brighton) Male Survivors Berkshire CIC (Berkshire)      
    Feb 06, 2017 2976
  • 24 Jan 2017
      Cleveland Pools is the only surviving Georgian Swimming Pool in the UK. Sadly the pools have been closed for swimming for over quarter of a century. However there is now an appeal being run through Localgiving to rejuvenate and reopen this forgotten landmark. This appeal, led by local resident Suzy Granger, has really caught the imagination of the local community.  On the week commencing 6th February, 8 local swim schools and approximately 700 children will be participating in a swimathon to raise money for the campaign. We spoke to Suzy in advance of the big swim to find out what inspired the campaign, what makes Cleveland Pools so important and how supporters can get involved with the campaign. What makes Cleveland Pools special and how will this campaign benefit the local community? “The Cleveland Pools is the only surviving Georgian swimming pool in the UK. Closed for swimming in 1984, a trust was formed in 2005 by local campaigners to save the 200 year old site with it crescent-shaped cottage and changing cubicles.  Situated on the banks of the river Avon it is a peaceful and beautiful location to enjoy an outdoor swimming experience.  It will be the only public outdoor swimming pool in Bath so will be a great asset to the local community in the summer months, especially as it will be naturally heated and treated for the first time in its history. Outdoor swimming has had a revival in recent years and it will be a great opportunity for Bath to have such an offering for its local community.” Tell us about the challenge? “I thought it would be great to get the swimming community in Bath involved in raising money for Cleveland Pools.  I have organised sponsored swims before at my swim school, Bath School of Swimming.  However I have never organised a sponsored swim of this scale with so many swim schools involved.  To my knowledge this is the first time the whole swimming community in Bath have come together to raise money collectively.” What are you enjoying and looking forward to about running this appeal? “Lots of people have heard about the Cleveland Pools but don’t know where they are in Bath and know little of their history.  This is an opportunity to raise awareness of the pools with the swimming community.  I am also looking forward to witnessing the swimming community coming together and collectively raising money for such a great cause.” How can people get involved with the appeal? If you would like to make a donation to support the Swimathon then please go here. If any local companies want to match fund what the swimmers raise we would be really grateful and they should get in touch with suzy@clevelandpools.org.uk. Likewise get in touch with Suzy if you would like your swim school to take part.  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 3 Top Tips On Creating Great Social Media Content For Charities Big Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge  
    3431 Posted by Lewis Garland
  •   Cleveland Pools is the only surviving Georgian Swimming Pool in the UK. Sadly the pools have been closed for swimming for over quarter of a century. However there is now an appeal being run through Localgiving to rejuvenate and reopen this forgotten landmark. This appeal, led by local resident Suzy Granger, has really caught the imagination of the local community.  On the week commencing 6th February, 8 local swim schools and approximately 700 children will be participating in a swimathon to raise money for the campaign. We spoke to Suzy in advance of the big swim to find out what inspired the campaign, what makes Cleveland Pools so important and how supporters can get involved with the campaign. What makes Cleveland Pools special and how will this campaign benefit the local community? “The Cleveland Pools is the only surviving Georgian swimming pool in the UK. Closed for swimming in 1984, a trust was formed in 2005 by local campaigners to save the 200 year old site with it crescent-shaped cottage and changing cubicles.  Situated on the banks of the river Avon it is a peaceful and beautiful location to enjoy an outdoor swimming experience.  It will be the only public outdoor swimming pool in Bath so will be a great asset to the local community in the summer months, especially as it will be naturally heated and treated for the first time in its history. Outdoor swimming has had a revival in recent years and it will be a great opportunity for Bath to have such an offering for its local community.” Tell us about the challenge? “I thought it would be great to get the swimming community in Bath involved in raising money for Cleveland Pools.  I have organised sponsored swims before at my swim school, Bath School of Swimming.  However I have never organised a sponsored swim of this scale with so many swim schools involved.  To my knowledge this is the first time the whole swimming community in Bath have come together to raise money collectively.” What are you enjoying and looking forward to about running this appeal? “Lots of people have heard about the Cleveland Pools but don’t know where they are in Bath and know little of their history.  This is an opportunity to raise awareness of the pools with the swimming community.  I am also looking forward to witnessing the swimming community coming together and collectively raising money for such a great cause.” How can people get involved with the appeal? If you would like to make a donation to support the Swimathon then please go here. If any local companies want to match fund what the swimmers raise we would be really grateful and they should get in touch with suzy@clevelandpools.org.uk. Likewise get in touch with Suzy if you would like your swim school to take part.  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 3 Top Tips On Creating Great Social Media Content For Charities Big Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge  
    Jan 24, 2017 3431
  • 23 Jan 2017
    Every year our Local Hero campaign shines a spotlight on the incredible work of individual fundraisers. This campaign sees fundraisers competing over a month to top our Local Hero leader board. 2016 saw a nail-biting race to the finish line, with fundraisers changing positions right until the last minute. Our eventual champion, Alastair Sill, secured an incredible 317 unique funders, raising over £4000 for Taking Flight Theatre Company - plus a further £1000 in prize money. We recently had a chat with Alistair to discuss what inspired him to take part in Local Hero, to find out what his greatest challenges were during the month and to gather some tips for those interested in participating in this year’s campaign. How did you hear about the Local Hero campaign and why did you choose to support Taking Flight Theatre Company? “The theatre company had heard about the Local Hero campaign and told me about it as it coincided with plans I had already been making to fundraise for them” “I have worked with them for 6 years now as an audio describer. I recognise how hard they are trying to make their work accessible to a wide audience and the difficulties they face” How did you decide upon your challenge? “I enjoy cycling and wanted to do a cycling challenge anyway. My decision to ride from the East to the west of Wales matched the tour route the theatre company were taking.” “Throughout the ride I stopped off in places they were performing to explain what the company was doing. The theatre company sent out actors to the schools before I arrived and delivered iambic pentameter workshops. I did some games involving audio description and talked about my role and explained what audio description is" What training did you do for your challenge? “I followed a hilly route quite near my house when cycling. There is also a lake quite near where I live that I cycled around. I built up to the challenge, got my stamina up and made sure I had enough supplements.” What did you enjoy most about participating in, and winning, Local Hero 2016? “I didn’t expect as many people to get behind it as they did. I wanted to do something to help Taking Flight Theatre Company. I was quite baffled by how many people got into the idea.”“I got into the friendly competitive edge. You respected everyone who was participating, all of the charities and causes they were raising money for were equally important so you wanted them to do well.” “The competition got lots of people involved who I hadn’t been in touch with a while. It was a nice surprise when people you hadn’t seen in a while donated. The amount people donated was also a surprise – we had somebody donate £500!” “It got really close at the end. Beth House, one of the directors of the company got really involved. I could see emails coming through saying “we need 7 more sponsors and then we’ve done it, we’ve only got 10 minute left”. I tweeted a lot about what I was doing and put updates on Facebook too." “The fact it was so tight created a great atmosphere and built up publicity for the company. It also engendered excitement for the tour before it had even begun.” Do you know how the money raised during Local Hero was spent ? “Taking Flight are about putting on accessible performances with artistic and creative integrity. The signers for example are characters in the play. There was a deaf actor playing the role of Juliet and the audio description was integrated into the performance. All of these things push the boundaries.” “These things take time to work in during rehearsals. The money raised from Localhero was spent on creating even more accessible performance so that people can go to watch the shows who wouldn’t ordinarily think about going to watch a live performance - to ensure nobody is isolated or segregated in any.” What advice would you give to people interested in participating in Local Hero 2017? Pick something you are going to enjoy doing that can engender an appetite among the public. The more you enjoy the prospect of doing the challenge yourself the more you will be able to sell that idea to other people. Make sure you do something you can really throw yourself into and have a good time while you’re doing it – you may not do something like it again Ensure you have people around you who are supportive and as into the idea as you are. You’ve got to think about the challenge you are doing and so you’ve got to get other people to help with getting the message out. It’s very difficult to do the campaigning and do the challenge yourself – although its important to play a part in that. Don’t be afraid of getting in touch with as many people you can. You’ll be surprised how many people will support you. Enjoy the competition - the Localgiving website is really easy to use and you can view your growing sponsors . And the fact that the winners get an extra £1000 on top of what they raise is a really great incentive.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Big Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge What Makes Local Charities Unique?  
    2541 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Every year our Local Hero campaign shines a spotlight on the incredible work of individual fundraisers. This campaign sees fundraisers competing over a month to top our Local Hero leader board. 2016 saw a nail-biting race to the finish line, with fundraisers changing positions right until the last minute. Our eventual champion, Alastair Sill, secured an incredible 317 unique funders, raising over £4000 for Taking Flight Theatre Company - plus a further £1000 in prize money. We recently had a chat with Alistair to discuss what inspired him to take part in Local Hero, to find out what his greatest challenges were during the month and to gather some tips for those interested in participating in this year’s campaign. How did you hear about the Local Hero campaign and why did you choose to support Taking Flight Theatre Company? “The theatre company had heard about the Local Hero campaign and told me about it as it coincided with plans I had already been making to fundraise for them” “I have worked with them for 6 years now as an audio describer. I recognise how hard they are trying to make their work accessible to a wide audience and the difficulties they face” How did you decide upon your challenge? “I enjoy cycling and wanted to do a cycling challenge anyway. My decision to ride from the East to the west of Wales matched the tour route the theatre company were taking.” “Throughout the ride I stopped off in places they were performing to explain what the company was doing. The theatre company sent out actors to the schools before I arrived and delivered iambic pentameter workshops. I did some games involving audio description and talked about my role and explained what audio description is" What training did you do for your challenge? “I followed a hilly route quite near my house when cycling. There is also a lake quite near where I live that I cycled around. I built up to the challenge, got my stamina up and made sure I had enough supplements.” What did you enjoy most about participating in, and winning, Local Hero 2016? “I didn’t expect as many people to get behind it as they did. I wanted to do something to help Taking Flight Theatre Company. I was quite baffled by how many people got into the idea.”“I got into the friendly competitive edge. You respected everyone who was participating, all of the charities and causes they were raising money for were equally important so you wanted them to do well.” “The competition got lots of people involved who I hadn’t been in touch with a while. It was a nice surprise when people you hadn’t seen in a while donated. The amount people donated was also a surprise – we had somebody donate £500!” “It got really close at the end. Beth House, one of the directors of the company got really involved. I could see emails coming through saying “we need 7 more sponsors and then we’ve done it, we’ve only got 10 minute left”. I tweeted a lot about what I was doing and put updates on Facebook too." “The fact it was so tight created a great atmosphere and built up publicity for the company. It also engendered excitement for the tour before it had even begun.” Do you know how the money raised during Local Hero was spent ? “Taking Flight are about putting on accessible performances with artistic and creative integrity. The signers for example are characters in the play. There was a deaf actor playing the role of Juliet and the audio description was integrated into the performance. All of these things push the boundaries.” “These things take time to work in during rehearsals. The money raised from Localhero was spent on creating even more accessible performance so that people can go to watch the shows who wouldn’t ordinarily think about going to watch a live performance - to ensure nobody is isolated or segregated in any.” What advice would you give to people interested in participating in Local Hero 2017? Pick something you are going to enjoy doing that can engender an appetite among the public. The more you enjoy the prospect of doing the challenge yourself the more you will be able to sell that idea to other people. Make sure you do something you can really throw yourself into and have a good time while you’re doing it – you may not do something like it again Ensure you have people around you who are supportive and as into the idea as you are. You’ve got to think about the challenge you are doing and so you’ve got to get other people to help with getting the message out. It’s very difficult to do the campaigning and do the challenge yourself – although its important to play a part in that. Don’t be afraid of getting in touch with as many people you can. You’ll be surprised how many people will support you. Enjoy the competition - the Localgiving website is really easy to use and you can view your growing sponsors . And the fact that the winners get an extra £1000 on top of what they raise is a really great incentive.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Big Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge What Makes Local Charities Unique?  
    Jan 23, 2017 2541