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  • 11 Aug 2016
    James  Ellis, a young rapper from Nottingham who was born with cerebral palsy, has a dream to perform at Bestival… and you could help him get there! The 26-year-old has been offered a once in a lifetime opportunity to play a 30 minute set at the popular four day music festival which draws a 60,000 strong crowd to the Isle of Wight. The offer came direct from festival founder Rob Da Bank after a campaign film which James made with Fixers, the charity which gives young people a voice, was tweeted to the renowned DJ. Bestival organisers are paying for James’ return ferry trip across the Solent but James is looking to fund the rest of the 420 mile round trip to play a set on September 9th. He needs to raise £855.20 to cover travel, including hiring a wheelchair accessible vehicle and one night’s accommodation for himself and a small team of three who will drive, support and care for him. In James’ poignant film, called ‘Self Belief’, James – who cannot walk unaided and uses a wheelchair - says he pushes himself to achieve challenging goals because he is determined not to be held back by his disabilities. James says: “When I step out of my comfort zone, I do think people are going to judge me. I’m the guy in a wheelchair, I’m going to be seen as different. But when I’m on stage rapping, whether it’s for one song for three minutes or six songs for 25 minutes, I’m free for that amount of time. I’m no longer the guy in the wheelchair. I’m the guy that’s rapping. The biggest dream that I would like to achieve is to play Bestival in my wheelchair. He who controls the dancefloor, controls the world!” You can watch James’ film here James says: "Having the opportunity to perform at Bestival shows that anything is possible with the right amount dedication and self-belief. I really hope people in Nottingham will support me to create a moment in history I’ll never forget." Adding: “I think a lot of disabled people don’t have confidence in themselves. It’s always important to have an end goal, even if it’s very small. My disability has never held me back. It doesn’t matter what you look like on the outside – what matters is your passion on the inside.” James’ local Member of Parliament, Graham Allen MP, commented: “This is a fantastic and deserving cause. James has demonstrated that having a disability does not mean you can’t participate in life to the full. I would urge everyone to donate whatever they can to help James perform at Bestival and make his dream a reality.” You can listen to James’ music here. Donate to James' campaign today: https://localgiving.org/appeal/getjamestobestival/ If James raises more than his target, funds will be used to support other young people to have the opportunity to become a Fixer and campaign on issues they feel strongly about. The charity has helped more than 19,000 youngsters across the UK to have a voice in their community on issues such as cyber-bullying, self-harm, suicide or transphobia.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Rio 2016 Olympics: Podiums & Playing FieldsKeeping Art Alive in CoventryHealthy giving for Healthy Living!  
    1956 Posted by Meg Lawrence
  • James  Ellis, a young rapper from Nottingham who was born with cerebral palsy, has a dream to perform at Bestival… and you could help him get there! The 26-year-old has been offered a once in a lifetime opportunity to play a 30 minute set at the popular four day music festival which draws a 60,000 strong crowd to the Isle of Wight. The offer came direct from festival founder Rob Da Bank after a campaign film which James made with Fixers, the charity which gives young people a voice, was tweeted to the renowned DJ. Bestival organisers are paying for James’ return ferry trip across the Solent but James is looking to fund the rest of the 420 mile round trip to play a set on September 9th. He needs to raise £855.20 to cover travel, including hiring a wheelchair accessible vehicle and one night’s accommodation for himself and a small team of three who will drive, support and care for him. In James’ poignant film, called ‘Self Belief’, James – who cannot walk unaided and uses a wheelchair - says he pushes himself to achieve challenging goals because he is determined not to be held back by his disabilities. James says: “When I step out of my comfort zone, I do think people are going to judge me. I’m the guy in a wheelchair, I’m going to be seen as different. But when I’m on stage rapping, whether it’s for one song for three minutes or six songs for 25 minutes, I’m free for that amount of time. I’m no longer the guy in the wheelchair. I’m the guy that’s rapping. The biggest dream that I would like to achieve is to play Bestival in my wheelchair. He who controls the dancefloor, controls the world!” You can watch James’ film here James says: "Having the opportunity to perform at Bestival shows that anything is possible with the right amount dedication and self-belief. I really hope people in Nottingham will support me to create a moment in history I’ll never forget." Adding: “I think a lot of disabled people don’t have confidence in themselves. It’s always important to have an end goal, even if it’s very small. My disability has never held me back. It doesn’t matter what you look like on the outside – what matters is your passion on the inside.” James’ local Member of Parliament, Graham Allen MP, commented: “This is a fantastic and deserving cause. James has demonstrated that having a disability does not mean you can’t participate in life to the full. I would urge everyone to donate whatever they can to help James perform at Bestival and make his dream a reality.” You can listen to James’ music here. Donate to James' campaign today: https://localgiving.org/appeal/getjamestobestival/ If James raises more than his target, funds will be used to support other young people to have the opportunity to become a Fixer and campaign on issues they feel strongly about. The charity has helped more than 19,000 youngsters across the UK to have a voice in their community on issues such as cyber-bullying, self-harm, suicide or transphobia.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Rio 2016 Olympics: Podiums & Playing FieldsKeeping Art Alive in CoventryHealthy giving for Healthy Living!  
    Aug 11, 2016 1956
  • 16 Jun 2016
    This summer David Charles and his girlfriend, Caz, are cycling an astonishing 3000 Miles across Europe, raising funds for London based refugee charity, The Bike Project. Starting in London and finishing at the town of Gaziantep on the Syria-Turkey border, this journey retraces the route taken by the thousands of refugees who have fled the war-torn country in recent years. Along the way they will be exploring how life has changed, both for refugees and also for communities living along the migration route. Localgiving recently took the chance to chat to David about his inspiration – and perspiration! What inspired you to take on this challenge? “The inspiration for this trip came directly from the volunteer work we've been doing with The Bike Project in London. The Bike Project takes second hand bikes, fixes them up and donates them to refugees so that they can travel around the city”. “Last year, we were part of a mass cycle ride to the migrant camp in Calais, donating more than 80 bikes to refugees there. That gave me the idea to cycle onwards, through France and Germany, across the Balkans to Greece and beyond, from where hundreds of thousands of people are trying to make a new life for themselves in Europe”. “I have been lucky enough in my life to be able to travel freely throughout the world, and have always received wonderful hospitality from everyone I have met, from Europe and the Americas to the Middle East and Asia. My support for charities like The Bike Project comes from a desire to return the generous hospitality that I have received to newcomers in my country, particularly to those who have been forced from their homes without the freedom of a passport and a ticket home”. What difficulties do you think you may face along the way? “The main challenges of the trip so far have been incredibly mundane: where to refill our water bottles, how to eat enough good food without spending too much money, when to stop for the night. Then yesterday I got bitten by a tick and now I'm panicking that I've got Lyme Disease! But in truth the only real challenge was committing to the ride, giving up our flats and leaving. Everything else is just logistics. What training have you done for the trip? “We both cycle a lot in London because public transport is so expensive. While I have done some bike touring before, Caz had never cycled more than 20 miles for two days in a row before this trip!” “Neither of us are what you'd call ‘serious cyclists’ - for us, it's just the easiest way of getting around. I believe that if you can cycle a mile to the shops, then you can probably cycle two and three miles. Keep turning your pedals, put those miles together and you've got a 2,500 mile tour across the continent!” What would you say to persuade or inspire other people to fundraise? “I've only ever fundraised like this a couple of times in my life - it simply must be a cause that you passionately believe in. “The Bike Project makes a really positive, visible difference to people's lives - not just for the refugees who come to the workshop and go home with what the suffragettes called 'freedom machines', but also for people like me, who come to help fix up the bikes and learn so much from both mechanics and refugees.” How can people follow your journey and donate? You can follow our journey on www.davidcharles.info or @dcisbusy on Instagram. People can donate to David here: CyclingSyria   Interested in finding out how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep A Week of Welcome: Refugee Week 2016    
    1885 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This summer David Charles and his girlfriend, Caz, are cycling an astonishing 3000 Miles across Europe, raising funds for London based refugee charity, The Bike Project. Starting in London and finishing at the town of Gaziantep on the Syria-Turkey border, this journey retraces the route taken by the thousands of refugees who have fled the war-torn country in recent years. Along the way they will be exploring how life has changed, both for refugees and also for communities living along the migration route. Localgiving recently took the chance to chat to David about his inspiration – and perspiration! What inspired you to take on this challenge? “The inspiration for this trip came directly from the volunteer work we've been doing with The Bike Project in London. The Bike Project takes second hand bikes, fixes them up and donates them to refugees so that they can travel around the city”. “Last year, we were part of a mass cycle ride to the migrant camp in Calais, donating more than 80 bikes to refugees there. That gave me the idea to cycle onwards, through France and Germany, across the Balkans to Greece and beyond, from where hundreds of thousands of people are trying to make a new life for themselves in Europe”. “I have been lucky enough in my life to be able to travel freely throughout the world, and have always received wonderful hospitality from everyone I have met, from Europe and the Americas to the Middle East and Asia. My support for charities like The Bike Project comes from a desire to return the generous hospitality that I have received to newcomers in my country, particularly to those who have been forced from their homes without the freedom of a passport and a ticket home”. What difficulties do you think you may face along the way? “The main challenges of the trip so far have been incredibly mundane: where to refill our water bottles, how to eat enough good food without spending too much money, when to stop for the night. Then yesterday I got bitten by a tick and now I'm panicking that I've got Lyme Disease! But in truth the only real challenge was committing to the ride, giving up our flats and leaving. Everything else is just logistics. What training have you done for the trip? “We both cycle a lot in London because public transport is so expensive. While I have done some bike touring before, Caz had never cycled more than 20 miles for two days in a row before this trip!” “Neither of us are what you'd call ‘serious cyclists’ - for us, it's just the easiest way of getting around. I believe that if you can cycle a mile to the shops, then you can probably cycle two and three miles. Keep turning your pedals, put those miles together and you've got a 2,500 mile tour across the continent!” What would you say to persuade or inspire other people to fundraise? “I've only ever fundraised like this a couple of times in my life - it simply must be a cause that you passionately believe in. “The Bike Project makes a really positive, visible difference to people's lives - not just for the refugees who come to the workshop and go home with what the suffragettes called 'freedom machines', but also for people like me, who come to help fix up the bikes and learn so much from both mechanics and refugees.” How can people follow your journey and donate? You can follow our journey on www.davidcharles.info or @dcisbusy on Instagram. People can donate to David here: CyclingSyria   Interested in finding out how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep A Week of Welcome: Refugee Week 2016    
    Jun 16, 2016 1885
  • 29 Apr 2016
    "I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again" - Dawn Prior When Dawn Prior was diagnosed with a rare form of terminal cancer in December 2015, few would have blamed her for reneging on her promise to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.  But Dawn is different.  In May, despite still going through a course chemotherapy, Dawn will be making the 5 day, 6000m trek up Africa’s highest peak. Dawn and her fellow intrepid trekkers will be climbing Kilimanjaro in support of the Bath based charity, Sporting Family Change. Sporting Family Change use sports to empower and inspire local families. Dawn first agreed to make the climb last September. “My brother-in-law runs Sporting Family Change, he was trying to get a group of people to go up Kilimanjaro. My sister was doing it and it seemed like a great opportunity, so I thought, “Let’s give it a go”. However, just two months later Dawn received her shattering news. “Obviously I was devastated... It really didn't sink in at first - people began talking to me about critical life insurance, cutting down work etc. Then I thought, let’s get on with it! bang- wallop- let’s get it sorted and let’s get on with life!” When Dawn told the medical professionals that she had made her mind up to continue with the climb they were amazed. “They look at me as if I was mad! The Doctors say 'go for it!'; The cancer nurse looks at me as if I was crazy.” Dawn is realistic about the huge challenges ahead – both in terms of her health and her climb. “I am worried about my breathing – this is concerning me for Kilimanjaro. Whether I make 2 days or I make the full 5 days, you can be sure I’ll be giving it a go – I understand a lot of (the challenge) is mental and I am  quite mentally strong.” “My life in some ways is on hold, but in some ways it is not because I am determined to go off and do Kilimanjaro. I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again.” Dawn hopes that her positive attitude and determination can be an inspiration to other people : “I accept the diagnosis but I don’t accept the verdict, once you accept the verdict you’re on a downhill slope. I didn't want to use the cancer card but this is going to be a huge challenge for me because I am undergoing chemo while doing it. I hope I can inspire other people". You can donate to Dawn here and to find out more about her cause, Sporting Family Change, here.       Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha  The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy    
    1972 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • "I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again" - Dawn Prior When Dawn Prior was diagnosed with a rare form of terminal cancer in December 2015, few would have blamed her for reneging on her promise to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.  But Dawn is different.  In May, despite still going through a course chemotherapy, Dawn will be making the 5 day, 6000m trek up Africa’s highest peak. Dawn and her fellow intrepid trekkers will be climbing Kilimanjaro in support of the Bath based charity, Sporting Family Change. Sporting Family Change use sports to empower and inspire local families. Dawn first agreed to make the climb last September. “My brother-in-law runs Sporting Family Change, he was trying to get a group of people to go up Kilimanjaro. My sister was doing it and it seemed like a great opportunity, so I thought, “Let’s give it a go”. However, just two months later Dawn received her shattering news. “Obviously I was devastated... It really didn't sink in at first - people began talking to me about critical life insurance, cutting down work etc. Then I thought, let’s get on with it! bang- wallop- let’s get it sorted and let’s get on with life!” When Dawn told the medical professionals that she had made her mind up to continue with the climb they were amazed. “They look at me as if I was mad! The Doctors say 'go for it!'; The cancer nurse looks at me as if I was crazy.” Dawn is realistic about the huge challenges ahead – both in terms of her health and her climb. “I am worried about my breathing – this is concerning me for Kilimanjaro. Whether I make 2 days or I make the full 5 days, you can be sure I’ll be giving it a go – I understand a lot of (the challenge) is mental and I am  quite mentally strong.” “My life in some ways is on hold, but in some ways it is not because I am determined to go off and do Kilimanjaro. I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again.” Dawn hopes that her positive attitude and determination can be an inspiration to other people : “I accept the diagnosis but I don’t accept the verdict, once you accept the verdict you’re on a downhill slope. I didn't want to use the cancer card but this is going to be a huge challenge for me because I am undergoing chemo while doing it. I hope I can inspire other people". You can donate to Dawn here and to find out more about her cause, Sporting Family Change, here.       Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha  The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy    
    Apr 29, 2016 1972
  • 25 Apr 2016
    Wendy Richmond, 80, is no ordinary granny.  Far from the TV and slippers, Wendy prefers to spend her time proving that age is not barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent among the snowy mountains of South Wales, raising funds for The Acorn Cancer Support Group . This zip-line challenge was a birthday present from Wendy’s family, who have gotten very used to her thrill seeking birthday requests. In recent years Wendy has been wing-walking, parachuting, outdoor and indoor ballooning and zip-lining. Each time she has been raising funds for charities that are close to her heart. What made Wendy start taking these challenges? “I’ve always been interested in planes. I saw a film a long time ago about wing walking and I remember thinking “I want to do that” but I never ever thought I’d be able to do it. Then, my family bought me this as a present for my 70th – They know what I like!” “I loved wing-walking – it’s the freedom – it was as if I had the will to fly.   You couldn’t see the plane as you were standing on the wing.  It was just an amazing feeling!  It’s absolutely out of this world, more than I ever expected it to be.” Why Acorn Cancer Support Group? Acorn Cancer Support Group, a small charity in St. Ives,  has made a big difference to Wendy’s life. Wendy sees this as a great way of giving back: “I had breast cancer 7 years ago.  A friend of my sons persuaded me to go. You don’t talk about cancer unless you want to. They take us out for meals and trips down the river – it’s just a beautiful place to go.  So relaxing – I love it”. A very proud family Wendy says that her family are “very proud” of her for her age-defying escapades.  Infact, the adventurous gene seems to have been passed down. Wendy’s son, Karn, was happy to take up the challenge when Wendy was too ill to complete the higher zip-wire in Wales.  Morever, Wendy’s grandchild is currently planning to walk over the 02 in London!     Has the time come for Wendy to put her feet up? “Well, I’m 80 now… but If I see a challenge I like, and I think I can do it, then maybe I will!” To donate to Wendy please go HERE,  and to find out more about Acorn Cancer Support Group  HERE   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    Dawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroStorytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep    
    1941 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Wendy Richmond, 80, is no ordinary granny.  Far from the TV and slippers, Wendy prefers to spend her time proving that age is not barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent among the snowy mountains of South Wales, raising funds for The Acorn Cancer Support Group . This zip-line challenge was a birthday present from Wendy’s family, who have gotten very used to her thrill seeking birthday requests. In recent years Wendy has been wing-walking, parachuting, outdoor and indoor ballooning and zip-lining. Each time she has been raising funds for charities that are close to her heart. What made Wendy start taking these challenges? “I’ve always been interested in planes. I saw a film a long time ago about wing walking and I remember thinking “I want to do that” but I never ever thought I’d be able to do it. Then, my family bought me this as a present for my 70th – They know what I like!” “I loved wing-walking – it’s the freedom – it was as if I had the will to fly.   You couldn’t see the plane as you were standing on the wing.  It was just an amazing feeling!  It’s absolutely out of this world, more than I ever expected it to be.” Why Acorn Cancer Support Group? Acorn Cancer Support Group, a small charity in St. Ives,  has made a big difference to Wendy’s life. Wendy sees this as a great way of giving back: “I had breast cancer 7 years ago.  A friend of my sons persuaded me to go. You don’t talk about cancer unless you want to. They take us out for meals and trips down the river – it’s just a beautiful place to go.  So relaxing – I love it”. A very proud family Wendy says that her family are “very proud” of her for her age-defying escapades.  Infact, the adventurous gene seems to have been passed down. Wendy’s son, Karn, was happy to take up the challenge when Wendy was too ill to complete the higher zip-wire in Wales.  Morever, Wendy’s grandchild is currently planning to walk over the 02 in London!     Has the time come for Wendy to put her feet up? “Well, I’m 80 now… but If I see a challenge I like, and I think I can do it, then maybe I will!” To donate to Wendy please go HERE,  and to find out more about Acorn Cancer Support Group  HERE   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    Dawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroStorytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep    
    Apr 25, 2016 1941
  • 19 Apr 2016
    Well, what a week it’s been for our Local Heroes!  Just as the leading pack seemed to be breaking away, we saw a sudden surge of support for new fundraisers.  Still lighting the way is Jordan Ignatius with his 5k per day challenge.  Jordan has so far accumulated 87 unique sponsors – quite a feat! Will our top prize be going to Jordan’s Reaching Higher Football Academy? Racing into second place is Tracey Avey who spent the night of 15th April sleeping rough for Street2Homes.  Just behind Tracey, in third place, is Laura Runham who is raising funds for Berkshire Lowland Search & Rescue in memory of her late grandfather. With so much changing on the leaderboard in the last week alone, it’s difficult to make any real predictions.  So, it’s all to play for as as we enter the final stretch of the race to be our Local Hero 2016 champion. With so many heroes to highlight, choosing who to feature is becoming harder and harder.  Here are four fundraisers who have raised the office cheer this week:   And it burns, burns, burns! The walk of fire  On April 14th, the members of Imara walked an impressive six metres for their cause.  Six metres that is on hot coals burning at 1236 degrees fahrenheit!   Walking the wall Foster Morton has recently followed an 84 mile walk along a roman wall up with a 2 day cycle home. Inspired by his grandson, who was recently born with severe epilepsy, all funds will be going to Smile for Life Children’s charity. A love of the Open water  Louise Eaton will be taking part in the Great East Swim at Alton Water Reservoir on 18th June. Louise is raising money for Suffolk Accident Rescue service. SARS supported her during a tragic accident 20 years ago this year. Dreams of para-para Parachutes Dayne Britten suffered a brain trauma at 23 which saw him spend 30 days in Hospital.  His passion for supporting other brain trauma survivors has  inspired him to take this leap, through which he will be raising funds for Headway Milton Keynes.   Bern-t food Bernie Lally and his family are buying no food for a fortnight! Dont' worry though - they'll still be getting-their fill. They'll be eating food that would otherwise go uneaten, supplied by Elsie's cafe (pay-what-you-feel. rescued food specialists). Bernie & co will be cooking creatively and sharing pictures of their rescued food creations. Donations will go to Fruitful Abundance, the charity that runs Elsie's cafe.  We’re want to hear your stories! If you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!     Found this Blog useful? You may also like:      The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy   Dawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    1598 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Well, what a week it’s been for our Local Heroes!  Just as the leading pack seemed to be breaking away, we saw a sudden surge of support for new fundraisers.  Still lighting the way is Jordan Ignatius with his 5k per day challenge.  Jordan has so far accumulated 87 unique sponsors – quite a feat! Will our top prize be going to Jordan’s Reaching Higher Football Academy? Racing into second place is Tracey Avey who spent the night of 15th April sleeping rough for Street2Homes.  Just behind Tracey, in third place, is Laura Runham who is raising funds for Berkshire Lowland Search & Rescue in memory of her late grandfather. With so much changing on the leaderboard in the last week alone, it’s difficult to make any real predictions.  So, it’s all to play for as as we enter the final stretch of the race to be our Local Hero 2016 champion. With so many heroes to highlight, choosing who to feature is becoming harder and harder.  Here are four fundraisers who have raised the office cheer this week:   And it burns, burns, burns! The walk of fire  On April 14th, the members of Imara walked an impressive six metres for their cause.  Six metres that is on hot coals burning at 1236 degrees fahrenheit!   Walking the wall Foster Morton has recently followed an 84 mile walk along a roman wall up with a 2 day cycle home. Inspired by his grandson, who was recently born with severe epilepsy, all funds will be going to Smile for Life Children’s charity. A love of the Open water  Louise Eaton will be taking part in the Great East Swim at Alton Water Reservoir on 18th June. Louise is raising money for Suffolk Accident Rescue service. SARS supported her during a tragic accident 20 years ago this year. Dreams of para-para Parachutes Dayne Britten suffered a brain trauma at 23 which saw him spend 30 days in Hospital.  His passion for supporting other brain trauma survivors has  inspired him to take this leap, through which he will be raising funds for Headway Milton Keynes.   Bern-t food Bernie Lally and his family are buying no food for a fortnight! Dont' worry though - they'll still be getting-their fill. They'll be eating food that would otherwise go uneaten, supplied by Elsie's cafe (pay-what-you-feel. rescued food specialists). Bernie & co will be cooking creatively and sharing pictures of their rescued food creations. Donations will go to Fruitful Abundance, the charity that runs Elsie's cafe.  We’re want to hear your stories! If you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!     Found this Blog useful? You may also like:      The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy   Dawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    Apr 19, 2016 1598
  • 13 Apr 2016
    We’re coming up to the half way mark of Local Hero 2016 and the race is on a knife-edge.  Who will make the cut? Leading the way today is Jordan Ignatius, igniting us with his 5K challenge. Jordan is fundraising to bring his youth team, Higher Reach FC,  to France for a summer football tour. Hot on Jordan’s heels is Dawn Prior who will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change.  Dawn’s moving story is an inspiration to us all. Just a few paces behind Dawn we have Noah Stanton running a half marathon for Leeds Carers and Suzy Hands skydiving in Dubai for Alzheimers Dementia Support. Check out our leaderboard HERE. With over two weeks to go there is still plenty of time for the table to turn! Of course, it’s not only our leaders who are doing amazing things this April.  This week’s featured heroes are: 10 Marathons in 10 days! Easy-Stevie! Steve Rulton, 54, only started running 18 months ago – now he’s planning to run 10 marathons in 10 day in aid of Suffolk Accident Rescue Service.   Milton Keynes YMCA is running a “Sleep-Easy" on 22nd April. Fundraisers will spend a night sleeping rough to highlight the issue of youth homelessness. Check out the pages of Ayesha, Ami, Katie, Keith  and many more!   Crossing the Tyne, on a line, a zip-line!  Paula Wright will be Zipping across the Tyne bridge on April 16th to raise funds and awareness for Escape Family Support   Leon McLeggan, fundraising for SAFE! Support for Young People Affected by Crime, promises “special moves” at the finishing Line of the London Marathon! Send us your pics Leon!         On April 10th Wendy Richmond showed us all that age is no barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent on the longest wire in Europe and fastest in the World - soaring five hundred feet in the air at speeds up to 100mph over a distance of a mile! Wendy is fundraising for The Acorn Cancer Support Group.     We’re always eager to hear your stories.  So, if you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!        
    1718 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’re coming up to the half way mark of Local Hero 2016 and the race is on a knife-edge.  Who will make the cut? Leading the way today is Jordan Ignatius, igniting us with his 5K challenge. Jordan is fundraising to bring his youth team, Higher Reach FC,  to France for a summer football tour. Hot on Jordan’s heels is Dawn Prior who will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change.  Dawn’s moving story is an inspiration to us all. Just a few paces behind Dawn we have Noah Stanton running a half marathon for Leeds Carers and Suzy Hands skydiving in Dubai for Alzheimers Dementia Support. Check out our leaderboard HERE. With over two weeks to go there is still plenty of time for the table to turn! Of course, it’s not only our leaders who are doing amazing things this April.  This week’s featured heroes are: 10 Marathons in 10 days! Easy-Stevie! Steve Rulton, 54, only started running 18 months ago – now he’s planning to run 10 marathons in 10 day in aid of Suffolk Accident Rescue Service.   Milton Keynes YMCA is running a “Sleep-Easy" on 22nd April. Fundraisers will spend a night sleeping rough to highlight the issue of youth homelessness. Check out the pages of Ayesha, Ami, Katie, Keith  and many more!   Crossing the Tyne, on a line, a zip-line!  Paula Wright will be Zipping across the Tyne bridge on April 16th to raise funds and awareness for Escape Family Support   Leon McLeggan, fundraising for SAFE! Support for Young People Affected by Crime, promises “special moves” at the finishing Line of the London Marathon! Send us your pics Leon!         On April 10th Wendy Richmond showed us all that age is no barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent on the longest wire in Europe and fastest in the World - soaring five hundred feet in the air at speeds up to 100mph over a distance of a mile! Wendy is fundraising for The Acorn Cancer Support Group.     We’re always eager to hear your stories.  So, if you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!        
    Apr 13, 2016 1718
  • 07 Apr 2016
    And they’re off!! We’re just one week into our Local Hero campaign and the race is already heating up. Our early front runners were Emily Lynn fundraising for Always a Chance and Richard Jennings fundraising for Berkshire Youth, both of whom recently ran the Reading Half-Marathon. However, a recent surge in support has seen Martin Green edging ahead for the Riff Raff Society. Jockeying for position in the following pack is an exciting array of runners, riders (and rough sleepers) Take a look at our leaderboard now to keep up to date with any changes. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our eye.  This week’s featured heroes are: A group of intrepid fundraisers are climbing up Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change!  Now that’s dedication - Kila la kheri! After a drunken promise,  Roger and Lee have found themselves walking coast to coast walk across England - 195 miles from the west coast town of St Bees to  Robin Hood's bay in aid of Charlotte's Brightside CLC. Keep up with their journey on twitter. Alistair is winging his way across Wales on his bike for Taking Fight Theatre Company. From Cardiff to Haverfordwest West – We wish you all the best! Carole Hickey is walking an extraordinary 800 Miles across Spain! This will take her from Seville in the south of Spain to Santiago de Compostela in the north.  Her funds are going to Suffolk Accident Rescue Service. On World Autism Day, Grace Wild and the amazing kids at  Helping Hands carried out a walk around the Peace Gardens in Sheffield. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until then, happy fundraising!       Images (top to bottom): Berkshire Youth Shoes, Fundraising for Sporting Family Change, Carole Hickey preparing for her spanish adventure  
    1458 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • And they’re off!! We’re just one week into our Local Hero campaign and the race is already heating up. Our early front runners were Emily Lynn fundraising for Always a Chance and Richard Jennings fundraising for Berkshire Youth, both of whom recently ran the Reading Half-Marathon. However, a recent surge in support has seen Martin Green edging ahead for the Riff Raff Society. Jockeying for position in the following pack is an exciting array of runners, riders (and rough sleepers) Take a look at our leaderboard now to keep up to date with any changes. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our eye.  This week’s featured heroes are: A group of intrepid fundraisers are climbing up Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change!  Now that’s dedication - Kila la kheri! After a drunken promise,  Roger and Lee have found themselves walking coast to coast walk across England - 195 miles from the west coast town of St Bees to  Robin Hood's bay in aid of Charlotte's Brightside CLC. Keep up with their journey on twitter. Alistair is winging his way across Wales on his bike for Taking Fight Theatre Company. From Cardiff to Haverfordwest West – We wish you all the best! Carole Hickey is walking an extraordinary 800 Miles across Spain! This will take her from Seville in the south of Spain to Santiago de Compostela in the north.  Her funds are going to Suffolk Accident Rescue Service. On World Autism Day, Grace Wild and the amazing kids at  Helping Hands carried out a walk around the Peace Gardens in Sheffield. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until then, happy fundraising!       Images (top to bottom): Berkshire Youth Shoes, Fundraising for Sporting Family Change, Carole Hickey preparing for her spanish adventure  
    Apr 07, 2016 1458
  • 29 Jul 2015
    Supporters of Bath Abbey have a huge task ahead. They are currently trying to raise £4.5 million for their Footprint project, a development programme to repair Bath Abbey's collapsing floor, install an Eco-friendly heating system using Bath's hot springs and create additional space and improved facilities for the half a million people who use the Abbey every year. One fundraising activity that took place was a 140 mile walk from Bath Abbey to Lambeth Palace, The Footprint Walk. The team set off on Sunday the 5th July and arrived in London 6 days later. Katie McGill, Development Officer from Bath Abbey explained that the #LocalHero campaign came at the right time to help promote their sponsored walk.   "#LocalHero seemed like a great way to encourage people to support the walk. It was nice that it didn’t matter how much people gave, just that the more supporters, the better chance we had of winning one of the prizes on offer. It was also perfect timing as the walk was due to start five days after the end of the #Localhero campaign. We had a rush of donations in the last days of the #Localhero competition as people really wanted their donation to count towards our score. It was very exciting to keep checking where we were on the leaderboard, wondering if we would make it into the top 5! It was also inspiring to see all the other brilliant fundraisers raising money for charities all across the country too." Strolling into 2nd Place The team, including the Rector, Edward Mason, Footprint Project Director Charles Curnock, Footprint Appeal Director Laura Brown & Churchwarden Emeritus Jeremy Key-Pugh managed to receive 103 points in the #LocalHero campaign landing them in 2nd place and winning them a £500 prize.  Currently, the team have raised over triple their original target and the total currently stands at £16,537.75, including offline donations, Gift Aid and their prize money. What's the secret to their success? Local support! "We’ve been spreading the word about the walk on our website, chatting to people about it on Twitter and Facebook using our hashtag #footprintwalk and via local media. The team of walkers were interviewed on BBC Radio Bristol, appeared in the local paper (twice!), in local magazines and blogs. We’ve also had lots of encouragement from local businesses, and the walkers friends, family and colleagues." See the team's fundraising page here or find out more about The Footprint Project.
    2117 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Supporters of Bath Abbey have a huge task ahead. They are currently trying to raise £4.5 million for their Footprint project, a development programme to repair Bath Abbey's collapsing floor, install an Eco-friendly heating system using Bath's hot springs and create additional space and improved facilities for the half a million people who use the Abbey every year. One fundraising activity that took place was a 140 mile walk from Bath Abbey to Lambeth Palace, The Footprint Walk. The team set off on Sunday the 5th July and arrived in London 6 days later. Katie McGill, Development Officer from Bath Abbey explained that the #LocalHero campaign came at the right time to help promote their sponsored walk.   "#LocalHero seemed like a great way to encourage people to support the walk. It was nice that it didn’t matter how much people gave, just that the more supporters, the better chance we had of winning one of the prizes on offer. It was also perfect timing as the walk was due to start five days after the end of the #Localhero campaign. We had a rush of donations in the last days of the #Localhero competition as people really wanted their donation to count towards our score. It was very exciting to keep checking where we were on the leaderboard, wondering if we would make it into the top 5! It was also inspiring to see all the other brilliant fundraisers raising money for charities all across the country too." Strolling into 2nd Place The team, including the Rector, Edward Mason, Footprint Project Director Charles Curnock, Footprint Appeal Director Laura Brown & Churchwarden Emeritus Jeremy Key-Pugh managed to receive 103 points in the #LocalHero campaign landing them in 2nd place and winning them a £500 prize.  Currently, the team have raised over triple their original target and the total currently stands at £16,537.75, including offline donations, Gift Aid and their prize money. What's the secret to their success? Local support! "We’ve been spreading the word about the walk on our website, chatting to people about it on Twitter and Facebook using our hashtag #footprintwalk and via local media. The team of walkers were interviewed on BBC Radio Bristol, appeared in the local paper (twice!), in local magazines and blogs. We’ve also had lots of encouragement from local businesses, and the walkers friends, family and colleagues." See the team's fundraising page here or find out more about The Footprint Project.
    Jul 29, 2015 2117
  • 14 Jul 2015
    June, 88, runs a community group called Singing with Dementia, Salford. This group supports around 65 people per week; People with Dementia and carers can come for respite, support, relaxation and fun. In this interview June reflects on how she learnt to use a computer, aged 79, and how technology helps her run her group. How did Singing with Dementia get started? “We had opened a Resource Centre in Eccles for people with dementia  and their Carers and, whilst it did well, we felt we could do more. After watching a programme on TV in which a musician worked with people with Dementia, I knew I had found the answer. It proved more difficult than anticipated to set up but we eventually managed it. Never in my wildest dreams did I  imagine it would ‘take off’ as it has. We had 16 people come the first day and now have 55 to 65 people attending every week.” How did you get started using a computer? “I already had a Dell computer and was attending various courses but was not very efficient. I decided to change to Apple and take advantage of their 1:1 teaching sessions. I needed to be more proficient and efficient and Apple helped with advice and teaching sessions. I now use my computer all the time for: Communicating with other groups, people interested in funding and every day business Reaching a lot of people- this saves us time and money Researching what’s new in the dementia world, who is doing what and where Filing of all documents - this is very efficient and documents are easily accessible at any time Applying for funding - most donors want online applications Correspondence” What were the biggest lessons learned for you? “Learning a new language and a new skill Realising what a powerful tool my computer is and putting my knowledge to good use to benefit my cause Becoming less worried about breaking my computer Conquering all of the above and then enjoying using my new knowledge to fully benefit my cause. It is a great feeling and worth all the effort. I am always learning as there is always something new in this exciting world we live in”   What are the benefits of using Facebook and Twitter? “It helps us to spread the word to a wider audience and puts us in touch with people doing similar work. People 'retweet' which means that more and more people can see what you do. You get exposure to different groups which normally would not be available to you. It builds a lot of interest - I have had many messages from overseas readers. You can use it to advertise forthcoming events and keeps your work in peoples' minds - this is very important.” So, what next? “Recently, we bought two iPads and I am using them to work with people with dementia as another method of interaction and communication. I am learning as I go along but it is taking off and proving to be another useful method in the art of communication. I download special games and use them as interaction tools - it is an ongoing learning experience!” What advice would you give to someone who is starting off using a computer and the internet?  “Take a knowledgeable person with you when you purchase a computer and buy the best that you can afford. Be certain that the shop that you buy from offers good customer service and that follow up advice is readily available. Have a clear idea of what you want the computer to do for you. Buy or borrow books and read up to increase your knowledge. Seek help and keep practicing until you are familiar with what you are doing. Be not afraid!!” “I would advise anyone to use computers for their charity work. It is an invaluable tool and if I can do it age 88 then anyone can!” To find out more about June's work with Singing with Dementia, go to their new website: www.singingwithdementia.co.uk . To support the work of Singing with Dementia, Salford, visit their Localgiving page: www.localgiving.com/swithdinsalford
    1748 Posted by Cara Sanquest
  • June, 88, runs a community group called Singing with Dementia, Salford. This group supports around 65 people per week; People with Dementia and carers can come for respite, support, relaxation and fun. In this interview June reflects on how she learnt to use a computer, aged 79, and how technology helps her run her group. How did Singing with Dementia get started? “We had opened a Resource Centre in Eccles for people with dementia  and their Carers and, whilst it did well, we felt we could do more. After watching a programme on TV in which a musician worked with people with Dementia, I knew I had found the answer. It proved more difficult than anticipated to set up but we eventually managed it. Never in my wildest dreams did I  imagine it would ‘take off’ as it has. We had 16 people come the first day and now have 55 to 65 people attending every week.” How did you get started using a computer? “I already had a Dell computer and was attending various courses but was not very efficient. I decided to change to Apple and take advantage of their 1:1 teaching sessions. I needed to be more proficient and efficient and Apple helped with advice and teaching sessions. I now use my computer all the time for: Communicating with other groups, people interested in funding and every day business Reaching a lot of people- this saves us time and money Researching what’s new in the dementia world, who is doing what and where Filing of all documents - this is very efficient and documents are easily accessible at any time Applying for funding - most donors want online applications Correspondence” What were the biggest lessons learned for you? “Learning a new language and a new skill Realising what a powerful tool my computer is and putting my knowledge to good use to benefit my cause Becoming less worried about breaking my computer Conquering all of the above and then enjoying using my new knowledge to fully benefit my cause. It is a great feeling and worth all the effort. I am always learning as there is always something new in this exciting world we live in”   What are the benefits of using Facebook and Twitter? “It helps us to spread the word to a wider audience and puts us in touch with people doing similar work. People 'retweet' which means that more and more people can see what you do. You get exposure to different groups which normally would not be available to you. It builds a lot of interest - I have had many messages from overseas readers. You can use it to advertise forthcoming events and keeps your work in peoples' minds - this is very important.” So, what next? “Recently, we bought two iPads and I am using them to work with people with dementia as another method of interaction and communication. I am learning as I go along but it is taking off and proving to be another useful method in the art of communication. I download special games and use them as interaction tools - it is an ongoing learning experience!” What advice would you give to someone who is starting off using a computer and the internet?  “Take a knowledgeable person with you when you purchase a computer and buy the best that you can afford. Be certain that the shop that you buy from offers good customer service and that follow up advice is readily available. Have a clear idea of what you want the computer to do for you. Buy or borrow books and read up to increase your knowledge. Seek help and keep practicing until you are familiar with what you are doing. Be not afraid!!” “I would advise anyone to use computers for their charity work. It is an invaluable tool and if I can do it age 88 then anyone can!” To find out more about June's work with Singing with Dementia, go to their new website: www.singingwithdementia.co.uk . To support the work of Singing with Dementia, Salford, visit their Localgiving page: www.localgiving.com/swithdinsalford
    Jul 14, 2015 1748
  • 26 Mar 2014
    Borough Bowling Club is one of the oldest crown green clubs on the East Coast, providing a friendly and welcoming atmosphere for anyone wanting to bowl. The club encourages everyone of any ability to get involved in bowls, providing coaching, training and social opportunities for new and existing members. Pete Charter is Chairman for the club. “Our sport is for people of all ages and ideal for families to join. I’m very passionate about it and it’s part of the local community. Many of them use the facilities and love to watch matches and competitions in the summer”. Like many local clubs, Borough Bowling Club have large maintenance costs to ensure a safe and enjoyable atmosphere for all. “We are looking to take over the green maintenance ourselves from Scarborough District Council. While we have a good relationship with them, the costs are great and currently costs us over £5000 a year, as well as rental of the grounds” explains Pete. A donation through Localgiving, would have a huge impact in achieving this vision. “Our members work hard to raise money through social events though we need to raise more in order to complete our project.” As Pete points out, the project is vitally important in ensuring the sustainability and viability of the club. “Borough Bowling Club has been there for many years and has become an important part of local area. Not just for members, but for the community as a whole”. The club was able to receive over £4,000 in matched donations following our North Yorkshire match fund campaign, which help greatly towards their yearly costs. Click here to visit their Localgiving page and learn more. 
    838 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Borough Bowling Club is one of the oldest crown green clubs on the East Coast, providing a friendly and welcoming atmosphere for anyone wanting to bowl. The club encourages everyone of any ability to get involved in bowls, providing coaching, training and social opportunities for new and existing members. Pete Charter is Chairman for the club. “Our sport is for people of all ages and ideal for families to join. I’m very passionate about it and it’s part of the local community. Many of them use the facilities and love to watch matches and competitions in the summer”. Like many local clubs, Borough Bowling Club have large maintenance costs to ensure a safe and enjoyable atmosphere for all. “We are looking to take over the green maintenance ourselves from Scarborough District Council. While we have a good relationship with them, the costs are great and currently costs us over £5000 a year, as well as rental of the grounds” explains Pete. A donation through Localgiving, would have a huge impact in achieving this vision. “Our members work hard to raise money through social events though we need to raise more in order to complete our project.” As Pete points out, the project is vitally important in ensuring the sustainability and viability of the club. “Borough Bowling Club has been there for many years and has become an important part of local area. Not just for members, but for the community as a whole”. The club was able to receive over £4,000 in matched donations following our North Yorkshire match fund campaign, which help greatly towards their yearly costs. Click here to visit their Localgiving page and learn more. 
    Mar 26, 2014 838