View By Date

Tags

Statistics

  • 285
    Blogs
  • 100
    Active Bloggers
43 blogs
  • 23 Jan 2017
    Every year our Local Hero campaign shines a spotlight on the incredible work of individual fundraisers. This campaign sees fundraisers competing over a month to top our Local Hero leader board. 2016 saw a nail-biting race to the finish line, with fundraisers changing positions right until the last minute. Our eventual champion, Alastair Sill, secured an incredible 317 unique funders, raising over £4000 for Taking Flight Theatre Company - plus a further £1000 in prize money. We recently had a chat with Alistair to discuss what inspired him to take part in Local Hero, to find out what his greatest challenges were during the month and to gather some tips for those interested in participating in this year’s campaign. How did you hear about the Local Hero campaign and why did you choose to support Taking Flight Theatre Company? “The theatre company had heard about the Local Hero campaign and told me about it as it coincided with plans I had already been making to fundraise for them” “I have worked with them for 6 years now as an audio describer. I recognise how hard they are trying to make their work accessible to a wide audience and the difficulties they face” How did you decide upon your challenge? “I enjoy cycling and wanted to do a cycling challenge anyway. My decision to ride from the East to the west of Wales matched the tour route the theatre company were taking.” “Throughout the ride I stopped off in places they were performing to explain what the company was doing. The theatre company sent out actors to the schools before I arrived and delivered iambic pentameter workshops. I did some games involving audio description and talked about my role and explained what audio description is" What training did you do for your challenge? “I followed a hilly route quite near my house when cycling. There is also a lake quite near where I live that I cycled around. I built up to the challenge, got my stamina up and made sure I had enough supplements.” What did you enjoy most about participating in, and winning, Local Hero 2016? “I didn’t expect as many people to get behind it as they did. I wanted to do something to help Taking Flight Theatre Company. I was quite baffled by how many people got into the idea.”“I got into the friendly competitive edge. You respected everyone who was participating, all of the charities and causes they were raising money for were equally important so you wanted them to do well.” “The competition got lots of people involved who I hadn’t been in touch with a while. It was a nice surprise when people you hadn’t seen in a while donated. The amount people donated was also a surprise – we had somebody donate £500!” “It got really close at the end. Beth House, one of the directors of the company got really involved. I could see emails coming through saying “we need 7 more sponsors and then we’ve done it, we’ve only got 10 minute left”. I tweeted a lot about what I was doing and put updates on Facebook too." “The fact it was so tight created a great atmosphere and built up publicity for the company. It also engendered excitement for the tour before it had even begun.” Do you know how the money raised during Local Hero was spent ? “Taking Flight are about putting on accessible performances with artistic and creative integrity. The signers for example are characters in the play. There was a deaf actor playing the role of Juliet and the audio description was integrated into the performance. All of these things push the boundaries.” “These things take time to work in during rehearsals. The money raised from Localhero was spent on creating even more accessible performance so that people can go to watch the shows who wouldn’t ordinarily think about going to watch a live performance - to ensure nobody is isolated or segregated in any.” What advice would you give to people interested in participating in Local Hero 2017? Pick something you are going to enjoy doing that can engender an appetite among the public. The more you enjoy the prospect of doing the challenge yourself the more you will be able to sell that idea to other people. Make sure you do something you can really throw yourself into and have a good time while you’re doing it – you may not do something like it again Ensure you have people around you who are supportive and as into the idea as you are. You’ve got to think about the challenge you are doing and so you’ve got to get other people to help with getting the message out. It’s very difficult to do the campaigning and do the challenge yourself – although its important to play a part in that. Don’t be afraid of getting in touch with as many people you can. You’ll be surprised how many people will support you. Enjoy the competition - the Localgiving website is really easy to use and you can view your growing sponsors . And the fact that the winners get an extra £1000 on top of what they raise is a really great incentive.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Big Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge What Makes Local Charities Unique?  
    2460 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Every year our Local Hero campaign shines a spotlight on the incredible work of individual fundraisers. This campaign sees fundraisers competing over a month to top our Local Hero leader board. 2016 saw a nail-biting race to the finish line, with fundraisers changing positions right until the last minute. Our eventual champion, Alastair Sill, secured an incredible 317 unique funders, raising over £4000 for Taking Flight Theatre Company - plus a further £1000 in prize money. We recently had a chat with Alistair to discuss what inspired him to take part in Local Hero, to find out what his greatest challenges were during the month and to gather some tips for those interested in participating in this year’s campaign. How did you hear about the Local Hero campaign and why did you choose to support Taking Flight Theatre Company? “The theatre company had heard about the Local Hero campaign and told me about it as it coincided with plans I had already been making to fundraise for them” “I have worked with them for 6 years now as an audio describer. I recognise how hard they are trying to make their work accessible to a wide audience and the difficulties they face” How did you decide upon your challenge? “I enjoy cycling and wanted to do a cycling challenge anyway. My decision to ride from the East to the west of Wales matched the tour route the theatre company were taking.” “Throughout the ride I stopped off in places they were performing to explain what the company was doing. The theatre company sent out actors to the schools before I arrived and delivered iambic pentameter workshops. I did some games involving audio description and talked about my role and explained what audio description is" What training did you do for your challenge? “I followed a hilly route quite near my house when cycling. There is also a lake quite near where I live that I cycled around. I built up to the challenge, got my stamina up and made sure I had enough supplements.” What did you enjoy most about participating in, and winning, Local Hero 2016? “I didn’t expect as many people to get behind it as they did. I wanted to do something to help Taking Flight Theatre Company. I was quite baffled by how many people got into the idea.”“I got into the friendly competitive edge. You respected everyone who was participating, all of the charities and causes they were raising money for were equally important so you wanted them to do well.” “The competition got lots of people involved who I hadn’t been in touch with a while. It was a nice surprise when people you hadn’t seen in a while donated. The amount people donated was also a surprise – we had somebody donate £500!” “It got really close at the end. Beth House, one of the directors of the company got really involved. I could see emails coming through saying “we need 7 more sponsors and then we’ve done it, we’ve only got 10 minute left”. I tweeted a lot about what I was doing and put updates on Facebook too." “The fact it was so tight created a great atmosphere and built up publicity for the company. It also engendered excitement for the tour before it had even begun.” Do you know how the money raised during Local Hero was spent ? “Taking Flight are about putting on accessible performances with artistic and creative integrity. The signers for example are characters in the play. There was a deaf actor playing the role of Juliet and the audio description was integrated into the performance. All of these things push the boundaries.” “These things take time to work in during rehearsals. The money raised from Localhero was spent on creating even more accessible performance so that people can go to watch the shows who wouldn’t ordinarily think about going to watch a live performance - to ensure nobody is isolated or segregated in any.” What advice would you give to people interested in participating in Local Hero 2017? Pick something you are going to enjoy doing that can engender an appetite among the public. The more you enjoy the prospect of doing the challenge yourself the more you will be able to sell that idea to other people. Make sure you do something you can really throw yourself into and have a good time while you’re doing it – you may not do something like it again Ensure you have people around you who are supportive and as into the idea as you are. You’ve got to think about the challenge you are doing and so you’ve got to get other people to help with getting the message out. It’s very difficult to do the campaigning and do the challenge yourself – although its important to play a part in that. Don’t be afraid of getting in touch with as many people you can. You’ll be surprised how many people will support you. Enjoy the competition - the Localgiving website is really easy to use and you can view your growing sponsors . And the fact that the winners get an extra £1000 on top of what they raise is a really great incentive.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Big Strong Heart: Tips for your Charity Challenge What Makes Local Charities Unique?  
    Jan 23, 2017 2460
  • 28 Nov 2016
    Thanks to generous funding from the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, Localgiving has been running a Regional Development Programme in the North West of England which has been supporting local charities who are engaged in projects which benefit the environment, or help people to engage with the natural world. Eligible charities have received a free membership to Localgiving, ongoing one-to-one support in their online fundraising activities, and up to £500 of the money they raise online is matched through funding provided by the People’s Postcode Lottery and their players. This #GivingTuesday (Tuesday 29th November) we’re highlighting some of the fantastic projects and charities who have benefited from the generosity of the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, without whom none of the below would have been possible. Ruth Hannah, Gorgeous Gorse Hill Gorgeous Gorse Hill is a small community group in Greater Manchester. We’re made up of local residents, who got together to improve our local area through the use of art, planting and flowers. We believe that positive changes to a local area can benefit the health and wellbeing of local people, by making residents feel more connected to their area, more empowered, and that by making positive changes, we can help reduce negative behaviour. Being able to fundraise online, and the match funding that’s been available, have been very useful for our group, and has helped in a number of ways. It’s freed up time for volunteers who would usually try to raise funds through completing grant applications, which can be time consuming, and it has also freed up our use of funds, as a lot of grant applications won't allow charities to funds for core costs, which for us is vital i.e. insurance, or the cost of shed rental. Even hot drinks on a cold winter day during a full day of planting can sometimes not be covered. With our unrestricted income from Localgiving and matched funds from the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, we no longer need to worry as much about covering these costs. This has allowed us to focus on what we really want to focus on – making Gorse Hill Gorgeous! The wider support offered from Localgiving has been great. Joe’s suggestions about ways to fundraise have opened our eyes and the amount we have raised and then had match funded has been incredible. Anita Morris, Hack Back Hack Back CIC is a small social enterprise that aims to improve the mental health and well-being of people of all ages throughout the North West. What makes us different is that we combine psychological therapies with interaction and engagement with nature, and specifically with Birds of Prey.  Taking part in the programme has enabled us to raise funds by reaching a much wider audience. We have been able to use social media to inform people about our fundraising and the ease of the process has meant that we have been successful in raising funds. In addition supporters were able to set up their own fundraising page to personalise their support for Hack Back. We have learned that it is important to get your message across succinctly through social media and that it must be easy for people to donate, which was achieved through Localgiving.  The funding, both from our donors and then matched by the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, has made a massive difference to us. We have been able to deliver one to one sessions in the home of a child with autism, we have visited a terminally ill lady in her own home, we have been able to visit a young boy with a rare form of bone cancer several times and we have been able to deliver an anti-bullying project in a local school. Without this funding all of this would have been very difficult to achieve, and the real difference the funding from players of the People’s Postcode Lottery has made is that it has enabled us to deliver projects and services we may have had to decline previously, even though there is a clear need.  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- These are just two examples among many of the fantastic work done by local charities which the generosity of the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery has helped. This #GivingTuesday, we thought it would be a good time to look back, and to reflect on the real difference this support has helped to make, and to also take the time to say thank you as well. So this one goes out to all the players (of the People’s Postcode Lottery) out there – THANKS! There’s still opportunities to get involved in this programme, so if you are or know of a charity who could benefit, please do look here for further information.   
    5480 Posted by Joe Burns
  • Thanks to generous funding from the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, Localgiving has been running a Regional Development Programme in the North West of England which has been supporting local charities who are engaged in projects which benefit the environment, or help people to engage with the natural world. Eligible charities have received a free membership to Localgiving, ongoing one-to-one support in their online fundraising activities, and up to £500 of the money they raise online is matched through funding provided by the People’s Postcode Lottery and their players. This #GivingTuesday (Tuesday 29th November) we’re highlighting some of the fantastic projects and charities who have benefited from the generosity of the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, without whom none of the below would have been possible. Ruth Hannah, Gorgeous Gorse Hill Gorgeous Gorse Hill is a small community group in Greater Manchester. We’re made up of local residents, who got together to improve our local area through the use of art, planting and flowers. We believe that positive changes to a local area can benefit the health and wellbeing of local people, by making residents feel more connected to their area, more empowered, and that by making positive changes, we can help reduce negative behaviour. Being able to fundraise online, and the match funding that’s been available, have been very useful for our group, and has helped in a number of ways. It’s freed up time for volunteers who would usually try to raise funds through completing grant applications, which can be time consuming, and it has also freed up our use of funds, as a lot of grant applications won't allow charities to funds for core costs, which for us is vital i.e. insurance, or the cost of shed rental. Even hot drinks on a cold winter day during a full day of planting can sometimes not be covered. With our unrestricted income from Localgiving and matched funds from the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, we no longer need to worry as much about covering these costs. This has allowed us to focus on what we really want to focus on – making Gorse Hill Gorgeous! The wider support offered from Localgiving has been great. Joe’s suggestions about ways to fundraise have opened our eyes and the amount we have raised and then had match funded has been incredible. Anita Morris, Hack Back Hack Back CIC is a small social enterprise that aims to improve the mental health and well-being of people of all ages throughout the North West. What makes us different is that we combine psychological therapies with interaction and engagement with nature, and specifically with Birds of Prey.  Taking part in the programme has enabled us to raise funds by reaching a much wider audience. We have been able to use social media to inform people about our fundraising and the ease of the process has meant that we have been successful in raising funds. In addition supporters were able to set up their own fundraising page to personalise their support for Hack Back. We have learned that it is important to get your message across succinctly through social media and that it must be easy for people to donate, which was achieved through Localgiving.  The funding, both from our donors and then matched by the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery, has made a massive difference to us. We have been able to deliver one to one sessions in the home of a child with autism, we have visited a terminally ill lady in her own home, we have been able to visit a young boy with a rare form of bone cancer several times and we have been able to deliver an anti-bullying project in a local school. Without this funding all of this would have been very difficult to achieve, and the real difference the funding from players of the People’s Postcode Lottery has made is that it has enabled us to deliver projects and services we may have had to decline previously, even though there is a clear need.  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- These are just two examples among many of the fantastic work done by local charities which the generosity of the players of the People’s Postcode Lottery has helped. This #GivingTuesday, we thought it would be a good time to look back, and to reflect on the real difference this support has helped to make, and to also take the time to say thank you as well. So this one goes out to all the players (of the People’s Postcode Lottery) out there – THANKS! There’s still opportunities to get involved in this programme, so if you are or know of a charity who could benefit, please do look here for further information.   
    Nov 28, 2016 5480
  • 01 Nov 2016
    In July, thanks to generous funding and support from Big Lottery Wales, we launched our new Development Programme for Wales. Through the programme, Localgiving will work with 250 local community groups across Wales. It is an entirely free opportunity and includes free Localgiving membership for a  year, gift aid claimed on each group’s behalf, free training in online fundraising, 1:1 support from a locally based member of staff, £200 matchfunding for every group that signs up and further matchfunding campaigns throughout the year. We now have the pleasure of working with groups across Wales... One of the groups that has already made a great start is Friends of the City of Swansea Botanical Gardens. They are run by a large group of volunteers who are working to develop 3 public parks in Swansea.  As part of their work, they are creating a Wildflower/Wellbeing Garden in Singleton Park - to achieve this they need funds. Localgiving has been working with them to create both their group’s main fundraising page and a specific appeal for their wildflower project. They began this appeal at the start of October and have already raised £2780.75, which includes the £200 matchfunding that they have now earned as a successful participant in the Wales Development Programme. It also includes £271.25 gift aid that we have accessed and processed for them with no worry or admin time needed from them. Furthermore, during  our Grow Your Tenner campaign they have unlocked a further £370 matchfunding. How it works... After they expressed their interest in working with Localgiving, I went out to meet the group face-to-face at their base in one of the parks. I  worked through all of the basics of how to set up with Localgiving and how to get started with developing and promoting their cause. Since that point we have had much communication, they have attended a training session, Introduction to Online Fundraising, and are soon to attend a second session on Developing an Online Fundraising Campaign. This is the typical journey of a Wales group once they show interest in our year of free help. Hear from the group itself... Jane Terrett, volunteer: “One of the huge advantages of being associated with Localgiving is that you never feel you are on your own, there is always someone or somewhere you can go for help. Online fundraising enables us to reach people who are sympathetic to our cause who we didn’t even know existed. The online tips, advice and poster templates are invaluable. Donations are automatically paid into the bank account and the admin surrounding gift aid is taken care of. Fundraising isn’t easy and you do need to put in the work setting up the site and getting the message across to the local community so they know about your page. As an organisation, we weren’t sure whether online fundraising was to way to go as most of our supporters are 70+. However the publicity surrounding the webpage has resulted in many online donations - and also gifts of cash and cheques that we wouldn’t have secured without the online campaign. We are delighted with the progress, but checking the website is getting addictive!” Have a look at their brilliant appeal: localgiving.org/appeal/wildflowers   
    2647 Posted by Lauren Swain
  • In July, thanks to generous funding and support from Big Lottery Wales, we launched our new Development Programme for Wales. Through the programme, Localgiving will work with 250 local community groups across Wales. It is an entirely free opportunity and includes free Localgiving membership for a  year, gift aid claimed on each group’s behalf, free training in online fundraising, 1:1 support from a locally based member of staff, £200 matchfunding for every group that signs up and further matchfunding campaigns throughout the year. We now have the pleasure of working with groups across Wales... One of the groups that has already made a great start is Friends of the City of Swansea Botanical Gardens. They are run by a large group of volunteers who are working to develop 3 public parks in Swansea.  As part of their work, they are creating a Wildflower/Wellbeing Garden in Singleton Park - to achieve this they need funds. Localgiving has been working with them to create both their group’s main fundraising page and a specific appeal for their wildflower project. They began this appeal at the start of October and have already raised £2780.75, which includes the £200 matchfunding that they have now earned as a successful participant in the Wales Development Programme. It also includes £271.25 gift aid that we have accessed and processed for them with no worry or admin time needed from them. Furthermore, during  our Grow Your Tenner campaign they have unlocked a further £370 matchfunding. How it works... After they expressed their interest in working with Localgiving, I went out to meet the group face-to-face at their base in one of the parks. I  worked through all of the basics of how to set up with Localgiving and how to get started with developing and promoting their cause. Since that point we have had much communication, they have attended a training session, Introduction to Online Fundraising, and are soon to attend a second session on Developing an Online Fundraising Campaign. This is the typical journey of a Wales group once they show interest in our year of free help. Hear from the group itself... Jane Terrett, volunteer: “One of the huge advantages of being associated with Localgiving is that you never feel you are on your own, there is always someone or somewhere you can go for help. Online fundraising enables us to reach people who are sympathetic to our cause who we didn’t even know existed. The online tips, advice and poster templates are invaluable. Donations are automatically paid into the bank account and the admin surrounding gift aid is taken care of. Fundraising isn’t easy and you do need to put in the work setting up the site and getting the message across to the local community so they know about your page. As an organisation, we weren’t sure whether online fundraising was to way to go as most of our supporters are 70+. However the publicity surrounding the webpage has resulted in many online donations - and also gifts of cash and cheques that we wouldn’t have secured without the online campaign. We are delighted with the progress, but checking the website is getting addictive!” Have a look at their brilliant appeal: localgiving.org/appeal/wildflowers   
    Nov 01, 2016 2647
  • 11 Aug 2016
    James  Ellis, a young rapper from Nottingham who was born with cerebral palsy, has a dream to perform at Bestival… and you could help him get there! The 26-year-old has been offered a once in a lifetime opportunity to play a 30 minute set at the popular four day music festival which draws a 60,000 strong crowd to the Isle of Wight. The offer came direct from festival founder Rob Da Bank after a campaign film which James made with Fixers, the charity which gives young people a voice, was tweeted to the renowned DJ. Bestival organisers are paying for James’ return ferry trip across the Solent but James is looking to fund the rest of the 420 mile round trip to play a set on September 9th. He needs to raise £855.20 to cover travel, including hiring a wheelchair accessible vehicle and one night’s accommodation for himself and a small team of three who will drive, support and care for him. In James’ poignant film, called ‘Self Belief’, James – who cannot walk unaided and uses a wheelchair - says he pushes himself to achieve challenging goals because he is determined not to be held back by his disabilities. James says: “When I step out of my comfort zone, I do think people are going to judge me. I’m the guy in a wheelchair, I’m going to be seen as different. But when I’m on stage rapping, whether it’s for one song for three minutes or six songs for 25 minutes, I’m free for that amount of time. I’m no longer the guy in the wheelchair. I’m the guy that’s rapping. The biggest dream that I would like to achieve is to play Bestival in my wheelchair. He who controls the dancefloor, controls the world!” You can watch James’ film here James says: "Having the opportunity to perform at Bestival shows that anything is possible with the right amount dedication and self-belief. I really hope people in Nottingham will support me to create a moment in history I’ll never forget." Adding: “I think a lot of disabled people don’t have confidence in themselves. It’s always important to have an end goal, even if it’s very small. My disability has never held me back. It doesn’t matter what you look like on the outside – what matters is your passion on the inside.” James’ local Member of Parliament, Graham Allen MP, commented: “This is a fantastic and deserving cause. James has demonstrated that having a disability does not mean you can’t participate in life to the full. I would urge everyone to donate whatever they can to help James perform at Bestival and make his dream a reality.” You can listen to James’ music here. Donate to James' campaign today: https://localgiving.org/appeal/getjamestobestival/ If James raises more than his target, funds will be used to support other young people to have the opportunity to become a Fixer and campaign on issues they feel strongly about. The charity has helped more than 19,000 youngsters across the UK to have a voice in their community on issues such as cyber-bullying, self-harm, suicide or transphobia.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Rio 2016 Olympics: Podiums & Playing FieldsKeeping Art Alive in CoventryHealthy giving for Healthy Living!  
    2183 Posted by Meg Lawrence
  • James  Ellis, a young rapper from Nottingham who was born with cerebral palsy, has a dream to perform at Bestival… and you could help him get there! The 26-year-old has been offered a once in a lifetime opportunity to play a 30 minute set at the popular four day music festival which draws a 60,000 strong crowd to the Isle of Wight. The offer came direct from festival founder Rob Da Bank after a campaign film which James made with Fixers, the charity which gives young people a voice, was tweeted to the renowned DJ. Bestival organisers are paying for James’ return ferry trip across the Solent but James is looking to fund the rest of the 420 mile round trip to play a set on September 9th. He needs to raise £855.20 to cover travel, including hiring a wheelchair accessible vehicle and one night’s accommodation for himself and a small team of three who will drive, support and care for him. In James’ poignant film, called ‘Self Belief’, James – who cannot walk unaided and uses a wheelchair - says he pushes himself to achieve challenging goals because he is determined not to be held back by his disabilities. James says: “When I step out of my comfort zone, I do think people are going to judge me. I’m the guy in a wheelchair, I’m going to be seen as different. But when I’m on stage rapping, whether it’s for one song for three minutes or six songs for 25 minutes, I’m free for that amount of time. I’m no longer the guy in the wheelchair. I’m the guy that’s rapping. The biggest dream that I would like to achieve is to play Bestival in my wheelchair. He who controls the dancefloor, controls the world!” You can watch James’ film here James says: "Having the opportunity to perform at Bestival shows that anything is possible with the right amount dedication and self-belief. I really hope people in Nottingham will support me to create a moment in history I’ll never forget." Adding: “I think a lot of disabled people don’t have confidence in themselves. It’s always important to have an end goal, even if it’s very small. My disability has never held me back. It doesn’t matter what you look like on the outside – what matters is your passion on the inside.” James’ local Member of Parliament, Graham Allen MP, commented: “This is a fantastic and deserving cause. James has demonstrated that having a disability does not mean you can’t participate in life to the full. I would urge everyone to donate whatever they can to help James perform at Bestival and make his dream a reality.” You can listen to James’ music here. Donate to James' campaign today: https://localgiving.org/appeal/getjamestobestival/ If James raises more than his target, funds will be used to support other young people to have the opportunity to become a Fixer and campaign on issues they feel strongly about. The charity has helped more than 19,000 youngsters across the UK to have a voice in their community on issues such as cyber-bullying, self-harm, suicide or transphobia.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Rio 2016 Olympics: Podiums & Playing FieldsKeeping Art Alive in CoventryHealthy giving for Healthy Living!  
    Aug 11, 2016 2183
  • 16 Jun 2016
    This summer David Charles and his girlfriend, Caz, are cycling an astonishing 3000 Miles across Europe, raising funds for London based refugee charity, The Bike Project. Starting in London and finishing at the town of Gaziantep on the Syria-Turkey border, this journey retraces the route taken by the thousands of refugees who have fled the war-torn country in recent years. Along the way they will be exploring how life has changed, both for refugees and also for communities living along the migration route. Localgiving recently took the chance to chat to David about his inspiration – and perspiration! What inspired you to take on this challenge? “The inspiration for this trip came directly from the volunteer work we've been doing with The Bike Project in London. The Bike Project takes second hand bikes, fixes them up and donates them to refugees so that they can travel around the city”. “Last year, we were part of a mass cycle ride to the migrant camp in Calais, donating more than 80 bikes to refugees there. That gave me the idea to cycle onwards, through France and Germany, across the Balkans to Greece and beyond, from where hundreds of thousands of people are trying to make a new life for themselves in Europe”. “I have been lucky enough in my life to be able to travel freely throughout the world, and have always received wonderful hospitality from everyone I have met, from Europe and the Americas to the Middle East and Asia. My support for charities like The Bike Project comes from a desire to return the generous hospitality that I have received to newcomers in my country, particularly to those who have been forced from their homes without the freedom of a passport and a ticket home”. What difficulties do you think you may face along the way? “The main challenges of the trip so far have been incredibly mundane: where to refill our water bottles, how to eat enough good food without spending too much money, when to stop for the night. Then yesterday I got bitten by a tick and now I'm panicking that I've got Lyme Disease! But in truth the only real challenge was committing to the ride, giving up our flats and leaving. Everything else is just logistics. What training have you done for the trip? “We both cycle a lot in London because public transport is so expensive. While I have done some bike touring before, Caz had never cycled more than 20 miles for two days in a row before this trip!” “Neither of us are what you'd call ‘serious cyclists’ - for us, it's just the easiest way of getting around. I believe that if you can cycle a mile to the shops, then you can probably cycle two and three miles. Keep turning your pedals, put those miles together and you've got a 2,500 mile tour across the continent!” What would you say to persuade or inspire other people to fundraise? “I've only ever fundraised like this a couple of times in my life - it simply must be a cause that you passionately believe in. “The Bike Project makes a really positive, visible difference to people's lives - not just for the refugees who come to the workshop and go home with what the suffragettes called 'freedom machines', but also for people like me, who come to help fix up the bikes and learn so much from both mechanics and refugees.” How can people follow your journey and donate? You can follow our journey on www.davidcharles.info or @dcisbusy on Instagram. People can donate to David here: CyclingSyria   Interested in finding out how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep A Week of Welcome: Refugee Week 2016    
    2144 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This summer David Charles and his girlfriend, Caz, are cycling an astonishing 3000 Miles across Europe, raising funds for London based refugee charity, The Bike Project. Starting in London and finishing at the town of Gaziantep on the Syria-Turkey border, this journey retraces the route taken by the thousands of refugees who have fled the war-torn country in recent years. Along the way they will be exploring how life has changed, both for refugees and also for communities living along the migration route. Localgiving recently took the chance to chat to David about his inspiration – and perspiration! What inspired you to take on this challenge? “The inspiration for this trip came directly from the volunteer work we've been doing with The Bike Project in London. The Bike Project takes second hand bikes, fixes them up and donates them to refugees so that they can travel around the city”. “Last year, we were part of a mass cycle ride to the migrant camp in Calais, donating more than 80 bikes to refugees there. That gave me the idea to cycle onwards, through France and Germany, across the Balkans to Greece and beyond, from where hundreds of thousands of people are trying to make a new life for themselves in Europe”. “I have been lucky enough in my life to be able to travel freely throughout the world, and have always received wonderful hospitality from everyone I have met, from Europe and the Americas to the Middle East and Asia. My support for charities like The Bike Project comes from a desire to return the generous hospitality that I have received to newcomers in my country, particularly to those who have been forced from their homes without the freedom of a passport and a ticket home”. What difficulties do you think you may face along the way? “The main challenges of the trip so far have been incredibly mundane: where to refill our water bottles, how to eat enough good food without spending too much money, when to stop for the night. Then yesterday I got bitten by a tick and now I'm panicking that I've got Lyme Disease! But in truth the only real challenge was committing to the ride, giving up our flats and leaving. Everything else is just logistics. What training have you done for the trip? “We both cycle a lot in London because public transport is so expensive. While I have done some bike touring before, Caz had never cycled more than 20 miles for two days in a row before this trip!” “Neither of us are what you'd call ‘serious cyclists’ - for us, it's just the easiest way of getting around. I believe that if you can cycle a mile to the shops, then you can probably cycle two and three miles. Keep turning your pedals, put those miles together and you've got a 2,500 mile tour across the continent!” What would you say to persuade or inspire other people to fundraise? “I've only ever fundraised like this a couple of times in my life - it simply must be a cause that you passionately believe in. “The Bike Project makes a really positive, visible difference to people's lives - not just for the refugees who come to the workshop and go home with what the suffragettes called 'freedom machines', but also for people like me, who come to help fix up the bikes and learn so much from both mechanics and refugees.” How can people follow your journey and donate? You can follow our journey on www.davidcharles.info or @dcisbusy on Instagram. People can donate to David here: CyclingSyria   Interested in finding out how you can support Refugees and Refugee groups through Localgiving?  Why not read these blogs: The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep A Week of Welcome: Refugee Week 2016    
    Jun 16, 2016 2144
  • 29 Apr 2016
    "I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again" - Dawn Prior When Dawn Prior was diagnosed with a rare form of terminal cancer in December 2015, few would have blamed her for reneging on her promise to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.  But Dawn is different.  In May, despite still going through a course chemotherapy, Dawn will be making the 5 day, 6000m trek up Africa’s highest peak. Dawn and her fellow intrepid trekkers will be climbing Kilimanjaro in support of the Bath based charity, Sporting Family Change. Sporting Family Change use sports to empower and inspire local families. Dawn first agreed to make the climb last September. “My brother-in-law runs Sporting Family Change, he was trying to get a group of people to go up Kilimanjaro. My sister was doing it and it seemed like a great opportunity, so I thought, “Let’s give it a go”. However, just two months later Dawn received her shattering news. “Obviously I was devastated... It really didn't sink in at first - people began talking to me about critical life insurance, cutting down work etc. Then I thought, let’s get on with it! bang- wallop- let’s get it sorted and let’s get on with life!” When Dawn told the medical professionals that she had made her mind up to continue with the climb they were amazed. “They look at me as if I was mad! The Doctors say 'go for it!'; The cancer nurse looks at me as if I was crazy.” Dawn is realistic about the huge challenges ahead – both in terms of her health and her climb. “I am worried about my breathing – this is concerning me for Kilimanjaro. Whether I make 2 days or I make the full 5 days, you can be sure I’ll be giving it a go – I understand a lot of (the challenge) is mental and I am  quite mentally strong.” “My life in some ways is on hold, but in some ways it is not because I am determined to go off and do Kilimanjaro. I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again.” Dawn hopes that her positive attitude and determination can be an inspiration to other people : “I accept the diagnosis but I don’t accept the verdict, once you accept the verdict you’re on a downhill slope. I didn't want to use the cancer card but this is going to be a huge challenge for me because I am undergoing chemo while doing it. I hope I can inspire other people". You can donate to Dawn here and to find out more about her cause, Sporting Family Change, here.       Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha  The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy    
    2234 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • "I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again" - Dawn Prior When Dawn Prior was diagnosed with a rare form of terminal cancer in December 2015, few would have blamed her for reneging on her promise to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.  But Dawn is different.  In May, despite still going through a course chemotherapy, Dawn will be making the 5 day, 6000m trek up Africa’s highest peak. Dawn and her fellow intrepid trekkers will be climbing Kilimanjaro in support of the Bath based charity, Sporting Family Change. Sporting Family Change use sports to empower and inspire local families. Dawn first agreed to make the climb last September. “My brother-in-law runs Sporting Family Change, he was trying to get a group of people to go up Kilimanjaro. My sister was doing it and it seemed like a great opportunity, so I thought, “Let’s give it a go”. However, just two months later Dawn received her shattering news. “Obviously I was devastated... It really didn't sink in at first - people began talking to me about critical life insurance, cutting down work etc. Then I thought, let’s get on with it! bang- wallop- let’s get it sorted and let’s get on with life!” When Dawn told the medical professionals that she had made her mind up to continue with the climb they were amazed. “They look at me as if I was mad! The Doctors say 'go for it!'; The cancer nurse looks at me as if I was crazy.” Dawn is realistic about the huge challenges ahead – both in terms of her health and her climb. “I am worried about my breathing – this is concerning me for Kilimanjaro. Whether I make 2 days or I make the full 5 days, you can be sure I’ll be giving it a go – I understand a lot of (the challenge) is mental and I am  quite mentally strong.” “My life in some ways is on hold, but in some ways it is not because I am determined to go off and do Kilimanjaro. I want to be at the top with my sister, my brother-in- law and friends - I may not have this opportunity again.” Dawn hopes that her positive attitude and determination can be an inspiration to other people : “I accept the diagnosis but I don’t accept the verdict, once you accept the verdict you’re on a downhill slope. I didn't want to use the cancer card but this is going to be a huge challenge for me because I am undergoing chemo while doing it. I hope I can inspire other people". You can donate to Dawn here and to find out more about her cause, Sporting Family Change, here.       Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha  The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy    
    Apr 29, 2016 2234
  • 25 Apr 2016
    Wendy Richmond, 80, is no ordinary granny.  Far from the TV and slippers, Wendy prefers to spend her time proving that age is not barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent among the snowy mountains of South Wales, raising funds for The Acorn Cancer Support Group . This zip-line challenge was a birthday present from Wendy’s family, who have gotten very used to her thrill seeking birthday requests. In recent years Wendy has been wing-walking, parachuting, outdoor and indoor ballooning and zip-lining. Each time she has been raising funds for charities that are close to her heart. What made Wendy start taking these challenges? “I’ve always been interested in planes. I saw a film a long time ago about wing walking and I remember thinking “I want to do that” but I never ever thought I’d be able to do it. Then, my family bought me this as a present for my 70th – They know what I like!” “I loved wing-walking – it’s the freedom – it was as if I had the will to fly.   You couldn’t see the plane as you were standing on the wing.  It was just an amazing feeling!  It’s absolutely out of this world, more than I ever expected it to be.” Why Acorn Cancer Support Group? Acorn Cancer Support Group, a small charity in St. Ives,  has made a big difference to Wendy’s life. Wendy sees this as a great way of giving back: “I had breast cancer 7 years ago.  A friend of my sons persuaded me to go. You don’t talk about cancer unless you want to. They take us out for meals and trips down the river – it’s just a beautiful place to go.  So relaxing – I love it”. A very proud family Wendy says that her family are “very proud” of her for her age-defying escapades.  Infact, the adventurous gene seems to have been passed down. Wendy’s son, Karn, was happy to take up the challenge when Wendy was too ill to complete the higher zip-wire in Wales.  Morever, Wendy’s grandchild is currently planning to walk over the 02 in London!     Has the time come for Wendy to put her feet up? “Well, I’m 80 now… but If I see a challenge I like, and I think I can do it, then maybe I will!” To donate to Wendy please go HERE,  and to find out more about Acorn Cancer Support Group  HERE   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    Dawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroStorytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep    
    2229 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Wendy Richmond, 80, is no ordinary granny.  Far from the TV and slippers, Wendy prefers to spend her time proving that age is not barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent among the snowy mountains of South Wales, raising funds for The Acorn Cancer Support Group . This zip-line challenge was a birthday present from Wendy’s family, who have gotten very used to her thrill seeking birthday requests. In recent years Wendy has been wing-walking, parachuting, outdoor and indoor ballooning and zip-lining. Each time she has been raising funds for charities that are close to her heart. What made Wendy start taking these challenges? “I’ve always been interested in planes. I saw a film a long time ago about wing walking and I remember thinking “I want to do that” but I never ever thought I’d be able to do it. Then, my family bought me this as a present for my 70th – They know what I like!” “I loved wing-walking – it’s the freedom – it was as if I had the will to fly.   You couldn’t see the plane as you were standing on the wing.  It was just an amazing feeling!  It’s absolutely out of this world, more than I ever expected it to be.” Why Acorn Cancer Support Group? Acorn Cancer Support Group, a small charity in St. Ives,  has made a big difference to Wendy’s life. Wendy sees this as a great way of giving back: “I had breast cancer 7 years ago.  A friend of my sons persuaded me to go. You don’t talk about cancer unless you want to. They take us out for meals and trips down the river – it’s just a beautiful place to go.  So relaxing – I love it”. A very proud family Wendy says that her family are “very proud” of her for her age-defying escapades.  Infact, the adventurous gene seems to have been passed down. Wendy’s son, Karn, was happy to take up the challenge when Wendy was too ill to complete the higher zip-wire in Wales.  Morever, Wendy’s grandchild is currently planning to walk over the 02 in London!     Has the time come for Wendy to put her feet up? “Well, I’m 80 now… but If I see a challenge I like, and I think I can do it, then maybe I will!” To donate to Wendy please go HERE,  and to find out more about Acorn Cancer Support Group  HERE   Found this Blog useful? You may also like:    Dawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroStorytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep    
    Apr 25, 2016 2229
  • 19 Apr 2016
    Well, what a week it’s been for our Local Heroes!  Just as the leading pack seemed to be breaking away, we saw a sudden surge of support for new fundraisers.  Still lighting the way is Jordan Ignatius with his 5k per day challenge.  Jordan has so far accumulated 87 unique sponsors – quite a feat! Will our top prize be going to Jordan’s Reaching Higher Football Academy? Racing into second place is Tracey Avey who spent the night of 15th April sleeping rough for Street2Homes.  Just behind Tracey, in third place, is Laura Runham who is raising funds for Berkshire Lowland Search & Rescue in memory of her late grandfather. With so much changing on the leaderboard in the last week alone, it’s difficult to make any real predictions.  So, it’s all to play for as as we enter the final stretch of the race to be our Local Hero 2016 champion. With so many heroes to highlight, choosing who to feature is becoming harder and harder.  Here are four fundraisers who have raised the office cheer this week:   And it burns, burns, burns! The walk of fire  On April 14th, the members of Imara walked an impressive six metres for their cause.  Six metres that is on hot coals burning at 1236 degrees fahrenheit!   Walking the wall Foster Morton has recently followed an 84 mile walk along a roman wall up with a 2 day cycle home. Inspired by his grandson, who was recently born with severe epilepsy, all funds will be going to Smile for Life Children’s charity. A love of the Open water  Louise Eaton will be taking part in the Great East Swim at Alton Water Reservoir on 18th June. Louise is raising money for Suffolk Accident Rescue service. SARS supported her during a tragic accident 20 years ago this year. Dreams of para-para Parachutes Dayne Britten suffered a brain trauma at 23 which saw him spend 30 days in Hospital.  His passion for supporting other brain trauma survivors has  inspired him to take this leap, through which he will be raising funds for Headway Milton Keynes.   Bern-t food Bernie Lally and his family are buying no food for a fortnight! Dont' worry though - they'll still be getting-their fill. They'll be eating food that would otherwise go uneaten, supplied by Elsie's cafe (pay-what-you-feel. rescued food specialists). Bernie & co will be cooking creatively and sharing pictures of their rescued food creations. Donations will go to Fruitful Abundance, the charity that runs Elsie's cafe.  We’re want to hear your stories! If you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!     Found this Blog useful? You may also like:      The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy   Dawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    1868 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Well, what a week it’s been for our Local Heroes!  Just as the leading pack seemed to be breaking away, we saw a sudden surge of support for new fundraisers.  Still lighting the way is Jordan Ignatius with his 5k per day challenge.  Jordan has so far accumulated 87 unique sponsors – quite a feat! Will our top prize be going to Jordan’s Reaching Higher Football Academy? Racing into second place is Tracey Avey who spent the night of 15th April sleeping rough for Street2Homes.  Just behind Tracey, in third place, is Laura Runham who is raising funds for Berkshire Lowland Search & Rescue in memory of her late grandfather. With so much changing on the leaderboard in the last week alone, it’s difficult to make any real predictions.  So, it’s all to play for as as we enter the final stretch of the race to be our Local Hero 2016 champion. With so many heroes to highlight, choosing who to feature is becoming harder and harder.  Here are four fundraisers who have raised the office cheer this week:   And it burns, burns, burns! The walk of fire  On April 14th, the members of Imara walked an impressive six metres for their cause.  Six metres that is on hot coals burning at 1236 degrees fahrenheit!   Walking the wall Foster Morton has recently followed an 84 mile walk along a roman wall up with a 2 day cycle home. Inspired by his grandson, who was recently born with severe epilepsy, all funds will be going to Smile for Life Children’s charity. A love of the Open water  Louise Eaton will be taking part in the Great East Swim at Alton Water Reservoir on 18th June. Louise is raising money for Suffolk Accident Rescue service. SARS supported her during a tragic accident 20 years ago this year. Dreams of para-para Parachutes Dayne Britten suffered a brain trauma at 23 which saw him spend 30 days in Hospital.  His passion for supporting other brain trauma survivors has  inspired him to take this leap, through which he will be raising funds for Headway Milton Keynes.   Bern-t food Bernie Lally and his family are buying no food for a fortnight! Dont' worry though - they'll still be getting-their fill. They'll be eating food that would otherwise go uneaten, supplied by Elsie's cafe (pay-what-you-feel. rescued food specialists). Bernie & co will be cooking creatively and sharing pictures of their rescued food creations. Donations will go to Fruitful Abundance, the charity that runs Elsie's cafe.  We’re want to hear your stories! If you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!     Found this Blog useful? You may also like:      The Sky is the limit for daring Granny Wendy   Dawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    Apr 19, 2016 1868
  • 13 Apr 2016
    We’re coming up to the half way mark of Local Hero 2016 and the race is on a knife-edge.  Who will make the cut? Leading the way today is Jordan Ignatius, igniting us with his 5K challenge. Jordan is fundraising to bring his youth team, Higher Reach FC,  to France for a summer football tour. Hot on Jordan’s heels is Dawn Prior who will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change.  Dawn’s moving story is an inspiration to us all. Just a few paces behind Dawn we have Noah Stanton running a half marathon for Leeds Carers and Suzy Hands skydiving in Dubai for Alzheimers Dementia Support. Check out our leaderboard HERE. With over two weeks to go there is still plenty of time for the table to turn! Of course, it’s not only our leaders who are doing amazing things this April.  This week’s featured heroes are: 10 Marathons in 10 days! Easy-Stevie! Steve Rulton, 54, only started running 18 months ago – now he’s planning to run 10 marathons in 10 day in aid of Suffolk Accident Rescue Service.   Milton Keynes YMCA is running a “Sleep-Easy" on 22nd April. Fundraisers will spend a night sleeping rough to highlight the issue of youth homelessness. Check out the pages of Ayesha, Ami, Katie, Keith  and many more!   Crossing the Tyne, on a line, a zip-line!  Paula Wright will be Zipping across the Tyne bridge on April 16th to raise funds and awareness for Escape Family Support   Leon McLeggan, fundraising for SAFE! Support for Young People Affected by Crime, promises “special moves” at the finishing Line of the London Marathon! Send us your pics Leon!         On April 10th Wendy Richmond showed us all that age is no barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent on the longest wire in Europe and fastest in the World - soaring five hundred feet in the air at speeds up to 100mph over a distance of a mile! Wendy is fundraising for The Acorn Cancer Support Group.     We’re always eager to hear your stories.  So, if you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!        
    1921 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’re coming up to the half way mark of Local Hero 2016 and the race is on a knife-edge.  Who will make the cut? Leading the way today is Jordan Ignatius, igniting us with his 5K challenge. Jordan is fundraising to bring his youth team, Higher Reach FC,  to France for a summer football tour. Hot on Jordan’s heels is Dawn Prior who will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change.  Dawn’s moving story is an inspiration to us all. Just a few paces behind Dawn we have Noah Stanton running a half marathon for Leeds Carers and Suzy Hands skydiving in Dubai for Alzheimers Dementia Support. Check out our leaderboard HERE. With over two weeks to go there is still plenty of time for the table to turn! Of course, it’s not only our leaders who are doing amazing things this April.  This week’s featured heroes are: 10 Marathons in 10 days! Easy-Stevie! Steve Rulton, 54, only started running 18 months ago – now he’s planning to run 10 marathons in 10 day in aid of Suffolk Accident Rescue Service.   Milton Keynes YMCA is running a “Sleep-Easy" on 22nd April. Fundraisers will spend a night sleeping rough to highlight the issue of youth homelessness. Check out the pages of Ayesha, Ami, Katie, Keith  and many more!   Crossing the Tyne, on a line, a zip-line!  Paula Wright will be Zipping across the Tyne bridge on April 16th to raise funds and awareness for Escape Family Support   Leon McLeggan, fundraising for SAFE! Support for Young People Affected by Crime, promises “special moves” at the finishing Line of the London Marathon! Send us your pics Leon!         On April 10th Wendy Richmond showed us all that age is no barrier. To celebrate her 80th birthday Wendy carried out a zip-wire descent on the longest wire in Europe and fastest in the World - soaring five hundred feet in the air at speeds up to 100mph over a distance of a mile! Wendy is fundraising for The Acorn Cancer Support Group.     We’re always eager to hear your stories.  So, if you have a fundraising tale that needs telling get in touch today! Happy fundraising local heroes!        
    Apr 13, 2016 1921
  • 07 Apr 2016
    And they’re off!! We’re just one week into our Local Hero campaign and the race is already heating up. Our early front runners were Emily Lynn fundraising for Always a Chance and Richard Jennings fundraising for Berkshire Youth, both of whom recently ran the Reading Half-Marathon. However, a recent surge in support has seen Martin Green edging ahead for the Riff Raff Society. Jockeying for position in the following pack is an exciting array of runners, riders (and rough sleepers) Take a look at our leaderboard now to keep up to date with any changes. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our eye.  This week’s featured heroes are: A group of intrepid fundraisers are climbing up Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change!  Now that’s dedication - Kila la kheri! After a drunken promise,  Roger and Lee have found themselves walking coast to coast walk across England - 195 miles from the west coast town of St Bees to  Robin Hood's bay in aid of Charlotte's Brightside CLC. Keep up with their journey on twitter. Alistair is winging his way across Wales on his bike for Taking Fight Theatre Company. From Cardiff to Haverfordwest West – We wish you all the best! Carole Hickey is walking an extraordinary 800 Miles across Spain! This will take her from Seville in the south of Spain to Santiago de Compostela in the north.  Her funds are going to Suffolk Accident Rescue Service. On World Autism Day, Grace Wild and the amazing kids at  Helping Hands carried out a walk around the Peace Gardens in Sheffield. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until then, happy fundraising!       Images (top to bottom): Berkshire Youth Shoes, Fundraising for Sporting Family Change, Carole Hickey preparing for her spanish adventure  
    1578 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • And they’re off!! We’re just one week into our Local Hero campaign and the race is already heating up. Our early front runners were Emily Lynn fundraising for Always a Chance and Richard Jennings fundraising for Berkshire Youth, both of whom recently ran the Reading Half-Marathon. However, a recent surge in support has seen Martin Green edging ahead for the Riff Raff Society. Jockeying for position in the following pack is an exciting array of runners, riders (and rough sleepers) Take a look at our leaderboard now to keep up to date with any changes. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our eye.  This week’s featured heroes are: A group of intrepid fundraisers are climbing up Kilimanjaro for Sporting Family Change!  Now that’s dedication - Kila la kheri! After a drunken promise,  Roger and Lee have found themselves walking coast to coast walk across England - 195 miles from the west coast town of St Bees to  Robin Hood's bay in aid of Charlotte's Brightside CLC. Keep up with their journey on twitter. Alistair is winging his way across Wales on his bike for Taking Fight Theatre Company. From Cardiff to Haverfordwest West – We wish you all the best! Carole Hickey is walking an extraordinary 800 Miles across Spain! This will take her from Seville in the south of Spain to Santiago de Compostela in the north.  Her funds are going to Suffolk Accident Rescue Service. On World Autism Day, Grace Wild and the amazing kids at  Helping Hands carried out a walk around the Peace Gardens in Sheffield. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until then, happy fundraising!       Images (top to bottom): Berkshire Youth Shoes, Fundraising for Sporting Family Change, Carole Hickey preparing for her spanish adventure  
    Apr 07, 2016 1578