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  • 06 Jun 2017
    United Way UK has announced new 'Give Local' grants for 2017. United Way UK collaborates with businesses and community partners in the voluntary sector to achieve positive change in education, income stability and health. What are ‘Give Local’ grants? 'Give Local' grants are £1,000 grants given to small charities and community groups who are benefitting local people in need. United Way believes that every person and organisation should be able to support their own, local community. ‘Give Local’ is a way to do this. People and businesses collectively give to a 'Give Local' pot, and 100% of the funds which they donate are then awarded to charities based within and benefitting their local community. Last year’s grants benefitted thousands of people in nearly 30 communities across the country. This film gives a few case studies Who can apply for a grant? The grants are available to small charities and organisations who help people within United Way's 'Give Local' communities. To find out if you work within one, and to download an application form, visit United Way Uk's dedicated web page before 30th June 2017.  Want to get involved? If you are a business and would like to establish ‘Give Local’ to benefit your local community through payroll giving, fundraising or volunteering, please do get in touch. Special thanks to the employees of Costco who ‘Give Local’ through payroll giving.   
  • United Way UK has announced new 'Give Local' grants for 2017. United Way UK collaborates with businesses and community partners in the voluntary sector to achieve positive change in education, income stability and health. What are ‘Give Local’ grants? 'Give Local' grants are £1,000 grants given to small charities and community groups who are benefitting local people in need. United Way believes that every person and organisation should be able to support their own, local community. ‘Give Local’ is a way to do this. People and businesses collectively give to a 'Give Local' pot, and 100% of the funds which they donate are then awarded to charities based within and benefitting their local community. Last year’s grants benefitted thousands of people in nearly 30 communities across the country. This film gives a few case studies Who can apply for a grant? The grants are available to small charities and organisations who help people within United Way's 'Give Local' communities. To find out if you work within one, and to download an application form, visit United Way Uk's dedicated web page before 30th June 2017.  Want to get involved? If you are a business and would like to establish ‘Give Local’ to benefit your local community through payroll giving, fundraising or volunteering, please do get in touch. Special thanks to the employees of Costco who ‘Give Local’ through payroll giving.   
    Jun 06, 2017 2416
  • 02 May 2017
    Local Hero 2017 has now come to an end. Thank you to everyone who participated in the campaign and a huge congratulations to those fundraisers who made it onto our leaderboard. The race was hard fought with participants jostling for position right until clock struck midnight on Monday 1st May. During the campaign 341 fundraisers raised £118k for 190 local charities and community groups from across the UK. We are delighted to announce that the winner of this year’s campaign is …  Adam Curtis Adam secured an impressive 261 unique sponsors, raising over £2000 for The Russell School plus an extra £1000 in prize money. £5,000 in prizes have been awarded to the causes supported by the top 20 fundraisers. A full list of our prize winners can be found on our leaderboard here. Participants have been ranked according to the number of unique online donors from whom they secured sponsorship throughout the month.  Once again, thank you all for making Local Hero 2017 such as success and remember, our next campaign, the Small Charities Week Match Fund, is just around the corner.  For advice on how to make the most of this campaign why not sign up to our webinars today!  
  • Local Hero 2017 has now come to an end. Thank you to everyone who participated in the campaign and a huge congratulations to those fundraisers who made it onto our leaderboard. The race was hard fought with participants jostling for position right until clock struck midnight on Monday 1st May. During the campaign 341 fundraisers raised £118k for 190 local charities and community groups from across the UK. We are delighted to announce that the winner of this year’s campaign is …  Adam Curtis Adam secured an impressive 261 unique sponsors, raising over £2000 for The Russell School plus an extra £1000 in prize money. £5,000 in prizes have been awarded to the causes supported by the top 20 fundraisers. A full list of our prize winners can be found on our leaderboard here. Participants have been ranked according to the number of unique online donors from whom they secured sponsorship throughout the month.  Once again, thank you all for making Local Hero 2017 such as success and remember, our next campaign, the Small Charities Week Match Fund, is just around the corner.  For advice on how to make the most of this campaign why not sign up to our webinars today!  
    May 02, 2017 1833
  • 28 Mar 2017
    The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    1783 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • The House of Lords Select Committee on Charities released its much anticipated report, Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society on Sunday 26th March. Localgiving is delighted to have contributed to this report.  Much of the evidence we gave was derived from our 2015 Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report.  We are proud to have been able to represent local charities across the UK and advocate on their behalf.  Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society is wide ranging in its findings and recommendations. The report gives 42 recommendations on key issues affecting the charity sector, echoing many of our own findings. It is positive to see the unique value and needs of small, local groups acknowledged and addressed throughout the report.   Below we highlight some of the key findings most relevant to small, local charities You can read the full report here. Contracts and Grants The report recognises that the “The commissioning landscape is skewed against smaller charities”. The shift towards large scale contracts and payment by results has excluded many smaller groups. The report recommends that commissioning practices are reformed to give smaller charities greater opportunities. This includes a revival of grants, smaller scale contracts and an increased focus on impact and social value rather than cost.   The report also recognises the need to put measures into place that reduce the “risks of larger organisations exploiting smaller charities through the commissioning and subcontracting process”. Digital technology The capacity of the charity sector to embrace digital technology varies widely. Many small groups lack the skills and confidence to fully benefit from technological advances. The report recommends that the Big Lottery Fund supports the sector’s infrastructure bodies to share knowledge on innovation and digitisation. Governance and accountability While the whole sector should aspire to a high standard of governance, larger charities must be held to a different standard to their smaller counterparts. Trustee skills Small charities would benefit from having free access to a template induction process for trustees. Social Investment Social investment is a useful tool but is unsuitable for many groups – smaller groups particular will not be ‘investment ready’ without significant extra resources. Government The report recommends that the Government consult more widely when making legislation and take time to understand the full impact of new laws on smaller groups.There is also a recognition that most small and medium group’s primary relationship with government is through their local authorities and therefore there should be closer consultation between relevent government departments.  Regulation The report argues that further regulation would place “a substantial bureaucratic burden on small charities”.  Moreover, concerns were expressed about the impact of a levy on small- and medium-sized charities. Charity Commission If the charity commission chooses to adopt a charging model it must “ensure that the burden does not fall upon small charities which will not be able to afford it”.   
    Mar 28, 2017 1783
  • 20 Feb 2017
    Do you have a big fundraising event or appeal coming up?   Do you have case study that perfectly explains  your work or cause? Reaching and engaging your key audiences (beneficiaries, funders, fundraisers and supporters) can be a real challenge.  One of the best ways to get your story out into the community and to the people who matter is through your local press. However, knowing who to contact and how can be a daunting task. The great news is that we have made this easier than ever.  We've compiled a list of local newspaper websites so that you can directly upload your story to the most relevant place(s). This allows you to get your stories straight to journalists working in your area directly through Localgiving. Find out more and contact your Local Newspaper Now  
  • Do you have a big fundraising event or appeal coming up?   Do you have case study that perfectly explains  your work or cause? Reaching and engaging your key audiences (beneficiaries, funders, fundraisers and supporters) can be a real challenge.  One of the best ways to get your story out into the community and to the people who matter is through your local press. However, knowing who to contact and how can be a daunting task. The great news is that we have made this easier than ever.  We've compiled a list of local newspaper websites so that you can directly upload your story to the most relevant place(s). This allows you to get your stories straight to journalists working in your area directly through Localgiving. Find out more and contact your Local Newspaper Now  
    Feb 20, 2017 3083
  • 20 Jan 2017
    As of 25th April 2017 we will be increasing the price of our annual membership from £72 to £96 (inc VAT) per year. As a non-profit itself, Localgiving is committed to helping local charities and community groups make the most of online fundraising. Since we started in 2009 we have held our pricing static, but just like everyone else, we are not immune from the effects of rising overheads, and so very reluctantly, we have concluded that we need to make a change. We have taken steps to minimise our internal costs, but we also want to run a sustainable organisation that is able to deliver the best possible services to you, our members - now and in the future. We commit to no further increases until at least 2020.   How Localgiving helps local charities & community groups In total, we have raised over £3m of match funding since we launched in 2009, all of which has been distributed to our members. In 2016 alone we distributed £300,000 of match funding, launched a new website and made over 120 technical updates to improve our services. We are vocal advocates for the local voluntary sector. The findings of our Local Charity and Sustainability Group Reports contributed to the government's decision to launch Local Charities Day. This directly benefited our members by bringing in extra funding for two match fund campaigns.  We are currently focusing our efforts on increasing the amount of funding and funding opportunities available to our members.  Since 2009 more than £15m has been raised for over 5,500 local charities and community groups via our fundraising platform.    Below are the key facts about the membership price increase for charities and community groups:  What existing members need to do: If you pay your membership by Direct Debit: Nothing. When you’re due to renew your membership, we’ll automatically collect your payment at the correct rate. We’ll email you beforehand to remind you. If you pay your membership by cheque or BACS: If your membership is set to renew on or after the 25th April 2017, please send us payment for £96 to cover your next year’s membership. We will be sure to notify you again nearer the time.  If your membership is set to renew before the 25th April 2017, then please send us your payment of £72. What new or overdue members need to do: If you complete the registration process and send us your payment before the 25th April, your first year’s membership will be charged at the existing rate of £72. If you complete your registration and/or send your payment on the 25th April or after, your membership will be charged at the new rate of £96. Please feel free to leave us your comments or suggestions, or get in touch with our helpdesk on 0300 111 2340 or help@localgiving.org for further information.      
  • As of 25th April 2017 we will be increasing the price of our annual membership from £72 to £96 (inc VAT) per year. As a non-profit itself, Localgiving is committed to helping local charities and community groups make the most of online fundraising. Since we started in 2009 we have held our pricing static, but just like everyone else, we are not immune from the effects of rising overheads, and so very reluctantly, we have concluded that we need to make a change. We have taken steps to minimise our internal costs, but we also want to run a sustainable organisation that is able to deliver the best possible services to you, our members - now and in the future. We commit to no further increases until at least 2020.   How Localgiving helps local charities & community groups In total, we have raised over £3m of match funding since we launched in 2009, all of which has been distributed to our members. In 2016 alone we distributed £300,000 of match funding, launched a new website and made over 120 technical updates to improve our services. We are vocal advocates for the local voluntary sector. The findings of our Local Charity and Sustainability Group Reports contributed to the government's decision to launch Local Charities Day. This directly benefited our members by bringing in extra funding for two match fund campaigns.  We are currently focusing our efforts on increasing the amount of funding and funding opportunities available to our members.  Since 2009 more than £15m has been raised for over 5,500 local charities and community groups via our fundraising platform.    Below are the key facts about the membership price increase for charities and community groups:  What existing members need to do: If you pay your membership by Direct Debit: Nothing. When you’re due to renew your membership, we’ll automatically collect your payment at the correct rate. We’ll email you beforehand to remind you. If you pay your membership by cheque or BACS: If your membership is set to renew on or after the 25th April 2017, please send us payment for £96 to cover your next year’s membership. We will be sure to notify you again nearer the time.  If your membership is set to renew before the 25th April 2017, then please send us your payment of £72. What new or overdue members need to do: If you complete the registration process and send us your payment before the 25th April, your first year’s membership will be charged at the existing rate of £72. If you complete your registration and/or send your payment on the 25th April or after, your membership will be charged at the new rate of £96. Please feel free to leave us your comments or suggestions, or get in touch with our helpdesk on 0300 111 2340 or help@localgiving.org for further information.      
    Jan 20, 2017 1317
  • 20 Dec 2016
    The Weston Charity Awards celebrate and support excellent charities working in the fields of Youth, Welfare and Community. This year, the awards will support 18 charities across the North East, North West, Yorkshire and the Midlands. Weston Award winners will receive £6,500 unrestricted grant funding alongside business mentoring support from capacity building charity Pilotlight. The purpose of the award is to support ambitious charities personally and financially so you can achieve your goals. For more information or to apply for the Weston Charity Awards 2017, please visit www.westoncharityawards.org. Applications close on Friday 13 January 2017.     
  • The Weston Charity Awards celebrate and support excellent charities working in the fields of Youth, Welfare and Community. This year, the awards will support 18 charities across the North East, North West, Yorkshire and the Midlands. Weston Award winners will receive £6,500 unrestricted grant funding alongside business mentoring support from capacity building charity Pilotlight. The purpose of the award is to support ambitious charities personally and financially so you can achieve your goals. For more information or to apply for the Weston Charity Awards 2017, please visit www.westoncharityawards.org. Applications close on Friday 13 January 2017.     
    Dec 20, 2016 4145
  • 19 Dec 2016
    On 16th December, to coincide with Local Charities Day, we released our second annual Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report. Using data from a survey of 598 local charity representatives carried out of the summer, this report provides a fascinating insight into the state of the local voluntary sector as we approach 2017. The last year has seen a continued escalation in demand for the services of local charities. Coupled with ongoing volatility in the funding landscape, this has left many groups fearful for their long term survival. The report finds that: Just 46% of local charities are confident they will be able to sustain themselves over the next five years. 67% of groups were still predicting stagnation or a downturn in their financial position over the coming year. 78% of groups predict an increase in demand over the coming year, of these groups just 18% feel that they are sufficiently resourced to meet this demand. Reductions in staff numbers pose a  serious problem, impacting on the continuity of services and affecting overall skill levels. 76% of respondents had seen a reduction of staff over the last year. 60% of respondents know of one or more local groups that have been forced to close in the last year. 77% of charities do not believe that they have the skills to run a successful fundraising campaign. Download the Full Report Here We conclude our report by laying out a number of recommendations for the coming year and beyond. We are particularly concerned about the urgent need to bring sustainable funding sources in the sector and to address the continued overreliance on under or unskilled staff. We hope that the results of this report will not only inform our own work over the coming year but also inspire other stakeholders in government, business and civil society to tackle the challenges facing the local voluntary sector.    
    5247 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • On 16th December, to coincide with Local Charities Day, we released our second annual Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report. Using data from a survey of 598 local charity representatives carried out of the summer, this report provides a fascinating insight into the state of the local voluntary sector as we approach 2017. The last year has seen a continued escalation in demand for the services of local charities. Coupled with ongoing volatility in the funding landscape, this has left many groups fearful for their long term survival. The report finds that: Just 46% of local charities are confident they will be able to sustain themselves over the next five years. 67% of groups were still predicting stagnation or a downturn in their financial position over the coming year. 78% of groups predict an increase in demand over the coming year, of these groups just 18% feel that they are sufficiently resourced to meet this demand. Reductions in staff numbers pose a  serious problem, impacting on the continuity of services and affecting overall skill levels. 76% of respondents had seen a reduction of staff over the last year. 60% of respondents know of one or more local groups that have been forced to close in the last year. 77% of charities do not believe that they have the skills to run a successful fundraising campaign. Download the Full Report Here We conclude our report by laying out a number of recommendations for the coming year and beyond. We are particularly concerned about the urgent need to bring sustainable funding sources in the sector and to address the continued overreliance on under or unskilled staff. We hope that the results of this report will not only inform our own work over the coming year but also inspire other stakeholders in government, business and civil society to tackle the challenges facing the local voluntary sector.    
    Dec 19, 2016 5247
  • 14 Nov 2016
    On October 12th the Open University Business School launched its new Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership in London, where they launched two new free, flexible and open learning courses on voluntary sector leadership. Full details of the launch conference and the courses are here, and some clips of the day will soon be posted on Open University Business School’s Youtube channel. What follows is a brief overview of the themes that emerged on the day, how CVSL is responding, and how people in the sector can get further involved in the debate. These are tough times for the sector – but there is a need to fight back An obvious theme of the day was that these are intimidating, tough times for the voluntary sector. Both our keynote speakers spoke eloquently about the ‘rise and (partial) fall’ of the sector in recent times, at least as far as its place within public policy. Sir Stuart Etherington argued forcefully that the sector is operating under much greater scrutiny on a wide number of fronts: over fundraising, governance, and high salaries. One audience member spoke eloquently about their organisation being almost at ‘breaking point’ due to funding reductions and lack of supports in the local environment. On the other hand, a contrasting theme reflected the sense that times have always been tough and that the sector shouldn’t necessarily accept this dominant ‘crisis’ narrative. It certainly shouldn’t become resigned to it, and should “come out fighting’. As Debra Allcock Tyler cautioned, “everyone is busy complaining there is not enough money but the voluntary sector has stopped asking for money: fewer people are asking for money and they’re asking for less. It’s a negative narrative”. She made a passionate plea for the sector to rediscover its confidence, its spark and campaigning nouse. There was a clear sense at the event that how leaders respond is important. And CVSL’s research and educational resources provide one forum for some of these discussions. But researchers need to recognise the real difficulties at ground level, particularly for the smaller organisations that CVSL is seeking to engage with. Collaboration is part of the answer, but is not a silver bullet Austerity and cuts have been widely seen as increasing the drive for greater collaboration. The voluntary sector is often a sought after partner for collaboration because of their local knowledge and connectedness; although there also be many hidden agendas at play. There is something of a consensus around that collaboration is now the name of the game; linked to doing more for less, reducing duplicative activity, and putting egos to one side. However, Siv Vangen and colleagues’ research strikes a note of caution because it demonstrates that collaboration needs energy: it has to take account of the different partners’ aims, cultures, trust and power imbalances, especially in terms of the leadership challenges and the associated anxiety and rewards. This is explored in more depth in an accompanying Guardian blog that coincided with the event. A ‘realist’ approach to collaboration acknowledges that behind the scenes you may need to: Use stealthy manipulative methods to get consensus Understand the political undercurrents and who needs to be involved But! Collaboration is by nature inefficient. Collaboration needs compromise, energy, commitment and care. Leaders need to nurture collaboration. CVSL thinks of leadership at it’s very simplest as ‘making things happen’, and the first course in particular explores this in depth. The second of the courses explores the dynamics, contexts and practices of collaborative leadership, drawing on a range of contemporary issues and case studies from the voluntary sector, so that learning takes place in an intimate relationship with lived practice. The role of trustees and the importance of diversity A clear theme of the day was the crucial role of trustees and the need to include them in dialogue about leadership development. The issue is undoubtedly complex but includes the difficulties of smaller organizations attracting trustees with a broad enough range of skills,  and the crucial role of chairs. There is a tendency to equate ‘leadership’ only with chief executives or senior managers and CVSL will be developing more work on this in the near future. CVSL is also very interested in the idea that there is a cohort of younger or less experienced leaders who need support and development. This chimes with crucial idea explored in the new courses that leadership happens at different levels of organisations. Closely related, a message that came through loud and clear was the need to work towards greater representativeness of voluntary sector leaderships at all different levels. The panel were pressed on this issue by members of the audience, and there was recognition that in some cases the sector had gone backwards on issues of gender and the presence of ethnic minority leaders at senior levels. Sir Stuart acknowledged that it was difficult to point to leaders from BME leading big charities How CVSL is responding to these issues and engaging with the sector One part of CVSL’s mission is experimenting with how online teaching and learning can be improved and done in a way that benefits the sector in these challenging times. Accessibility, flexibility and responsiveness is part of the answer but we also want to explore through dialogue with the sector the appropriate way to blend more ‘challenging’ and abstract debates around leadership with the practical, ‘day to day’ needs that organisations have for instance on governance, finance and sustainability. Also, as researchers we need to keep tabs about what is going on at ground level, over time; and that is why we are doing grounded research that explores different issues affecting the voluntary sector more broadly – eg on mental health or migration – as well as researching the leadership issues that are specific to the sector. We see this as a great opportunity to explore what works and try out new approaches to leadership development through online learning. So as participants rightly said, academic researchers need to “get out there and speak to the sector and do face to face stuff”, but also to sometimes ensure that the variety of learning resources to be broken down into ‘bite-size chunks’ so that learners can choose what is most useful to them. And we need to keep spreading the message. If you have found the issues discussed here useful and interesting there are a number of ways you can get involved. In particular, CVSL announced at the launch that it is now recruiting a Leadership Panel as a core part of its research activity. They would be delighted if you were willing to take part – the panel is designed to help the sector as well as individual leaders. Please complete this short survey to join the Panel. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha
    6085 Posted by James Rees
  • On October 12th the Open University Business School launched its new Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership in London, where they launched two new free, flexible and open learning courses on voluntary sector leadership. Full details of the launch conference and the courses are here, and some clips of the day will soon be posted on Open University Business School’s Youtube channel. What follows is a brief overview of the themes that emerged on the day, how CVSL is responding, and how people in the sector can get further involved in the debate. These are tough times for the sector – but there is a need to fight back An obvious theme of the day was that these are intimidating, tough times for the voluntary sector. Both our keynote speakers spoke eloquently about the ‘rise and (partial) fall’ of the sector in recent times, at least as far as its place within public policy. Sir Stuart Etherington argued forcefully that the sector is operating under much greater scrutiny on a wide number of fronts: over fundraising, governance, and high salaries. One audience member spoke eloquently about their organisation being almost at ‘breaking point’ due to funding reductions and lack of supports in the local environment. On the other hand, a contrasting theme reflected the sense that times have always been tough and that the sector shouldn’t necessarily accept this dominant ‘crisis’ narrative. It certainly shouldn’t become resigned to it, and should “come out fighting’. As Debra Allcock Tyler cautioned, “everyone is busy complaining there is not enough money but the voluntary sector has stopped asking for money: fewer people are asking for money and they’re asking for less. It’s a negative narrative”. She made a passionate plea for the sector to rediscover its confidence, its spark and campaigning nouse. There was a clear sense at the event that how leaders respond is important. And CVSL’s research and educational resources provide one forum for some of these discussions. But researchers need to recognise the real difficulties at ground level, particularly for the smaller organisations that CVSL is seeking to engage with. Collaboration is part of the answer, but is not a silver bullet Austerity and cuts have been widely seen as increasing the drive for greater collaboration. The voluntary sector is often a sought after partner for collaboration because of their local knowledge and connectedness; although there also be many hidden agendas at play. There is something of a consensus around that collaboration is now the name of the game; linked to doing more for less, reducing duplicative activity, and putting egos to one side. However, Siv Vangen and colleagues’ research strikes a note of caution because it demonstrates that collaboration needs energy: it has to take account of the different partners’ aims, cultures, trust and power imbalances, especially in terms of the leadership challenges and the associated anxiety and rewards. This is explored in more depth in an accompanying Guardian blog that coincided with the event. A ‘realist’ approach to collaboration acknowledges that behind the scenes you may need to: Use stealthy manipulative methods to get consensus Understand the political undercurrents and who needs to be involved But! Collaboration is by nature inefficient. Collaboration needs compromise, energy, commitment and care. Leaders need to nurture collaboration. CVSL thinks of leadership at it’s very simplest as ‘making things happen’, and the first course in particular explores this in depth. The second of the courses explores the dynamics, contexts and practices of collaborative leadership, drawing on a range of contemporary issues and case studies from the voluntary sector, so that learning takes place in an intimate relationship with lived practice. The role of trustees and the importance of diversity A clear theme of the day was the crucial role of trustees and the need to include them in dialogue about leadership development. The issue is undoubtedly complex but includes the difficulties of smaller organizations attracting trustees with a broad enough range of skills,  and the crucial role of chairs. There is a tendency to equate ‘leadership’ only with chief executives or senior managers and CVSL will be developing more work on this in the near future. CVSL is also very interested in the idea that there is a cohort of younger or less experienced leaders who need support and development. This chimes with crucial idea explored in the new courses that leadership happens at different levels of organisations. Closely related, a message that came through loud and clear was the need to work towards greater representativeness of voluntary sector leaderships at all different levels. The panel were pressed on this issue by members of the audience, and there was recognition that in some cases the sector had gone backwards on issues of gender and the presence of ethnic minority leaders at senior levels. Sir Stuart acknowledged that it was difficult to point to leaders from BME leading big charities How CVSL is responding to these issues and engaging with the sector One part of CVSL’s mission is experimenting with how online teaching and learning can be improved and done in a way that benefits the sector in these challenging times. Accessibility, flexibility and responsiveness is part of the answer but we also want to explore through dialogue with the sector the appropriate way to blend more ‘challenging’ and abstract debates around leadership with the practical, ‘day to day’ needs that organisations have for instance on governance, finance and sustainability. Also, as researchers we need to keep tabs about what is going on at ground level, over time; and that is why we are doing grounded research that explores different issues affecting the voluntary sector more broadly – eg on mental health or migration – as well as researching the leadership issues that are specific to the sector. We see this as a great opportunity to explore what works and try out new approaches to leadership development through online learning. So as participants rightly said, academic researchers need to “get out there and speak to the sector and do face to face stuff”, but also to sometimes ensure that the variety of learning resources to be broken down into ‘bite-size chunks’ so that learners can choose what is most useful to them. And we need to keep spreading the message. If you have found the issues discussed here useful and interesting there are a number of ways you can get involved. In particular, CVSL announced at the launch that it is now recruiting a Leadership Panel as a core part of its research activity. They would be delighted if you were willing to take part – the panel is designed to help the sector as well as individual leaders. Please complete this short survey to join the Panel. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha
    Nov 14, 2016 6085
  • 09 Nov 2016
      The way we fundraise and give is changing rapidly. As street and phone fundraisers are declining in potency and technology presents us with new possibilities, how do we tell our story most effectively to reach our goals, promote our causes and actively engage our supporters?   Our upcoming workshop will take you through the strategic processes behind running a successful fundraising or marketing campaign using video as a conversation starting tool. It will uncover affordable ways to make regular, engaging content and demystify the process of moving your fundraising and outreach efforts online.       Part 1: 9:30 - 12:30 Light breakfast and introductions Challenges faced by the third sector and the future of fundraising Getting to the heart of your story and needs Why video? Pre production, production, distribution and audience engagement  Turning supporters into evangelists  Lunch (bring your own or choose from local cafes)     Part 2: 13:30 - 15:00 •Creative exercise: facilitated work on your projects using planning tools and methods    Training outcomes: Understanding how charities need to change to stay relevant and visible Tools and progression routes for effective fundraising and marketing  An introduction to the basic process of making and using video for fundraising   Facilitator:    I, Ieva Padagaite, will facilitate the day. I am a filmmaker and communications specialist with a background in fiction storytelling and campaigning. I am  dedicated to effectively communicating stories and voices that make a difference.      Location: CAN Mezzanine, 7-14 Great Dover Street, SE1 4YR Date: Wednesday, 23 November 2016 Time: 09:30 - 15:30   Tickets: £40 per person (-20% for Localgiving members)   Register here: https://goo.gl/forms/LxYXBYa2GYehLvlj2
    5041 Posted by Ieva Padagaite
  •   The way we fundraise and give is changing rapidly. As street and phone fundraisers are declining in potency and technology presents us with new possibilities, how do we tell our story most effectively to reach our goals, promote our causes and actively engage our supporters?   Our upcoming workshop will take you through the strategic processes behind running a successful fundraising or marketing campaign using video as a conversation starting tool. It will uncover affordable ways to make regular, engaging content and demystify the process of moving your fundraising and outreach efforts online.       Part 1: 9:30 - 12:30 Light breakfast and introductions Challenges faced by the third sector and the future of fundraising Getting to the heart of your story and needs Why video? Pre production, production, distribution and audience engagement  Turning supporters into evangelists  Lunch (bring your own or choose from local cafes)     Part 2: 13:30 - 15:00 •Creative exercise: facilitated work on your projects using planning tools and methods    Training outcomes: Understanding how charities need to change to stay relevant and visible Tools and progression routes for effective fundraising and marketing  An introduction to the basic process of making and using video for fundraising   Facilitator:    I, Ieva Padagaite, will facilitate the day. I am a filmmaker and communications specialist with a background in fiction storytelling and campaigning. I am  dedicated to effectively communicating stories and voices that make a difference.      Location: CAN Mezzanine, 7-14 Great Dover Street, SE1 4YR Date: Wednesday, 23 November 2016 Time: 09:30 - 15:30   Tickets: £40 per person (-20% for Localgiving members)   Register here: https://goo.gl/forms/LxYXBYa2GYehLvlj2
    Nov 09, 2016 5041
  • 03 Nov 2016
    After a successful inaugural year, the Charity Governance Awards returns with a call for entries, a larger prize pot and a new additional prize category. Entry is now open to charities of all sizes in seven categories recognising outstanding governance, including the new category of ‘Embracing Digital’. Charities from all sectors can be in with a chance of winning one of seven £5,000 prizes of an unrestricted grant. The new category Embracing Digital recognises charity boards who have successfully embraced the opportunities that digital offers, and harnessed them to innovate or improve its activities. Other award categories reward charities who have dramatically turned around their fortunes; those that have created inclusive and diverse boards; and those who have significantly improved their impact. (See full category list below) The awards are totally free to enter and shortlisted entrants will receive a complimentary invitation to the official awards ceremony in London on 24th May 2017. Case studies of the shortlisted charities will also be featured in a special ebook available as a free resource for charities. The Charity Governance Awards are organised by The Clothworkers’ Company – a City Livery company that supports trusteeship initiatives – in partnership charity think thank and consultancy NPC (New Philanthropy Capital), volunteer matching charity Reach, and recruitment specialists Prospectus. Michael Howell, Chair of The Trusteeship Committee, The Clothworkers’ Company, said: “We all learnt a lot in judging the first Charity Governance Awards – it gave us an inspiring and, sometimes surprising, picture of what great governance looks like today. I am looking forward immensely to beginning this process again and hearing about exceptional charity boards, without whom charities are simply unable to make a positive difference. “There is still more to be done in rebuilding public trust in charities, but these Awards are one way for charities to demonstrate what great work they do, often behind closed doors. Let’s open those doors, reward great practice and help raise the bar for good governance across the whole sector.” To enter, a charity must have been established before 31 December 2013 and be registered in the UK. A charity may submit a single entry into only one of the following categories: • Board Diversity & Inclusivity• Embracing Digital• Embracing Opportunity & Harnessing Risk• Improving Impact - charities with 3 paid staff or fewer (including charities with no paid staff)• Improving Impact - charities with 4–25 paid staff• Improving Impact - charities with 26 paid staff or more• Managing Turnaround Entries must cover activities undertaken in the last five years (2011 – 2016); focus on the work of the main board, not sub-committees; and be made by a trustee, employee or volunteer of the charity. The deadline for entries is 23.59, Friday 13th January 2017. The 14-strong judging panel boasts a wealth of experience in charity governance and the voluntary sector. The judges include Dawn Austwick (Chief Executive, Big Lottery Fund), Stephen Greene (CEO and co-founder, RockCorps), Sara Llewellin (Chief Executive, Barrow Cadbury Trust), Dan Corry (Chief Executive, New Philanthropy Capital), Janet Thorne (CEO, Reach volunteering) and Vinay Nair (CEO & co-founder of Lightful) among many other notable names. (See website for a full list of judges). For full details, including an entry form, details of the judging panel and stories from the 2016 award winners, visit www.charitygovernanceawards.co.uk. You can follow the awards on Twitter using hashtag #charitygov17. Andy is Head of Business Development at charity recruitment specialists Prospectus. A member of the Senior Leadership Team, Andy works closely with the CEO and Directors on business development, operational projects, marketing and maintaining and developing client relationships. He has also project managed some of the more innovative schemes that Prospectus is involved with, such as the Beyond Profit Internship scheme and their role in the Do-it partnership. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 
    1666 Posted by Andy Tonnor
  • After a successful inaugural year, the Charity Governance Awards returns with a call for entries, a larger prize pot and a new additional prize category. Entry is now open to charities of all sizes in seven categories recognising outstanding governance, including the new category of ‘Embracing Digital’. Charities from all sectors can be in with a chance of winning one of seven £5,000 prizes of an unrestricted grant. The new category Embracing Digital recognises charity boards who have successfully embraced the opportunities that digital offers, and harnessed them to innovate or improve its activities. Other award categories reward charities who have dramatically turned around their fortunes; those that have created inclusive and diverse boards; and those who have significantly improved their impact. (See full category list below) The awards are totally free to enter and shortlisted entrants will receive a complimentary invitation to the official awards ceremony in London on 24th May 2017. Case studies of the shortlisted charities will also be featured in a special ebook available as a free resource for charities. The Charity Governance Awards are organised by The Clothworkers’ Company – a City Livery company that supports trusteeship initiatives – in partnership charity think thank and consultancy NPC (New Philanthropy Capital), volunteer matching charity Reach, and recruitment specialists Prospectus. Michael Howell, Chair of The Trusteeship Committee, The Clothworkers’ Company, said: “We all learnt a lot in judging the first Charity Governance Awards – it gave us an inspiring and, sometimes surprising, picture of what great governance looks like today. I am looking forward immensely to beginning this process again and hearing about exceptional charity boards, without whom charities are simply unable to make a positive difference. “There is still more to be done in rebuilding public trust in charities, but these Awards are one way for charities to demonstrate what great work they do, often behind closed doors. Let’s open those doors, reward great practice and help raise the bar for good governance across the whole sector.” To enter, a charity must have been established before 31 December 2013 and be registered in the UK. A charity may submit a single entry into only one of the following categories: • Board Diversity & Inclusivity• Embracing Digital• Embracing Opportunity & Harnessing Risk• Improving Impact - charities with 3 paid staff or fewer (including charities with no paid staff)• Improving Impact - charities with 4–25 paid staff• Improving Impact - charities with 26 paid staff or more• Managing Turnaround Entries must cover activities undertaken in the last five years (2011 – 2016); focus on the work of the main board, not sub-committees; and be made by a trustee, employee or volunteer of the charity. The deadline for entries is 23.59, Friday 13th January 2017. The 14-strong judging panel boasts a wealth of experience in charity governance and the voluntary sector. The judges include Dawn Austwick (Chief Executive, Big Lottery Fund), Stephen Greene (CEO and co-founder, RockCorps), Sara Llewellin (Chief Executive, Barrow Cadbury Trust), Dan Corry (Chief Executive, New Philanthropy Capital), Janet Thorne (CEO, Reach volunteering) and Vinay Nair (CEO & co-founder of Lightful) among many other notable names. (See website for a full list of judges). For full details, including an entry form, details of the judging panel and stories from the 2016 award winners, visit www.charitygovernanceawards.co.uk. You can follow the awards on Twitter using hashtag #charitygov17. Andy is Head of Business Development at charity recruitment specialists Prospectus. A member of the Senior Leadership Team, Andy works closely with the CEO and Directors on business development, operational projects, marketing and maintaining and developing client relationships. He has also project managed some of the more innovative schemes that Prospectus is involved with, such as the Beyond Profit Internship scheme and their role in the Do-it partnership. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina   Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 
    Nov 03, 2016 1666