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  • 20 Sep 2016
    Welsh electro-pop musician Bright Light Bright Light aka Rod Thomas, recently became an ambassador for Localgiving. It has been an exciting and hectic few months for Rod including an appearance on The Graham Norton Show, a support slot for Take That and the release of his third album, Choreography. While in London, Rod swung by for a chat. During our conversation Rod explained why he feels so passionately about grassroots charities, how his friendship with Elton John has influenced his desire to ‘give back’ and his experience of growing up in South Wales as a young artist. Can you sum your incredible year up in 3 words? “Amazing, Brilliant and Exhausting” What makes you so passionate about grassroots charities and community groups? “It’s really cool to be involved in something that isn’t just music based – as well as music based. Getting involved with Localgiving is really nice because you get to think about the real world outside of music which is a really refreshing change. Nobody knows what a community needs more than the people within that community, so grassroots charities are very important. It is people addressing specific needs within a specific location and trying to improve things from the bottom up When I was growing up I didn’t feel connected to places like London or New York or even really Britain generally because it felt like such a small part of the world. It was south Wales and a lot of the talk of what was happening in culture or education or finance was very localised. So I think that having charities that really focus on localised operations and localised problems is important”. You  are friends with Elton John, one of Music’s leading philanthropists. How has he influenced you? “It is really inspiring seeing someone who is one of the busiest musicians in the world and one of the most successful musicians in the world also finding as much time as he possibly can to raise awareness and raise money for charities. I think this is so incredible and I think that’s something that very very few people make the time to do when potentially they’ve got a platform to do that.” If you could set up a charity in your home town of Neath what would it do? “It would probably be something quite arts based, particularly focussing on business skills. When I was growing up people weren’t really taught about ways they could make the arts into a sustainable career or even an option. I always thought that music would be alongside a job and be a labour of love. I think being taught younger about how to make long-term plans would really help a lot of people to have a feeling that there is support and possibility for their ambitions because a lot of talent goes to waste because people just don’t know how to translate that talent into success.” Why should people support local charities? “Whether you like it or not you are always thinking about your locale and your neighbourhood, you town, your city, your friends… or at least you should be. So whatever you can do to support people within that immediate network is really important Localgiving is an excellent opportunity to do something small that makes a big difference!” Find out more about Bright Light Bright Light, including his music and his work with Localgiving by following him on twitter @Brightlightx2 and facebook.  And why not take this opportunity to find a charity near you?    
    1188 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Welsh electro-pop musician Bright Light Bright Light aka Rod Thomas, recently became an ambassador for Localgiving. It has been an exciting and hectic few months for Rod including an appearance on The Graham Norton Show, a support slot for Take That and the release of his third album, Choreography. While in London, Rod swung by for a chat. During our conversation Rod explained why he feels so passionately about grassroots charities, how his friendship with Elton John has influenced his desire to ‘give back’ and his experience of growing up in South Wales as a young artist. Can you sum your incredible year up in 3 words? “Amazing, Brilliant and Exhausting” What makes you so passionate about grassroots charities and community groups? “It’s really cool to be involved in something that isn’t just music based – as well as music based. Getting involved with Localgiving is really nice because you get to think about the real world outside of music which is a really refreshing change. Nobody knows what a community needs more than the people within that community, so grassroots charities are very important. It is people addressing specific needs within a specific location and trying to improve things from the bottom up When I was growing up I didn’t feel connected to places like London or New York or even really Britain generally because it felt like such a small part of the world. It was south Wales and a lot of the talk of what was happening in culture or education or finance was very localised. So I think that having charities that really focus on localised operations and localised problems is important”. You  are friends with Elton John, one of Music’s leading philanthropists. How has he influenced you? “It is really inspiring seeing someone who is one of the busiest musicians in the world and one of the most successful musicians in the world also finding as much time as he possibly can to raise awareness and raise money for charities. I think this is so incredible and I think that’s something that very very few people make the time to do when potentially they’ve got a platform to do that.” If you could set up a charity in your home town of Neath what would it do? “It would probably be something quite arts based, particularly focussing on business skills. When I was growing up people weren’t really taught about ways they could make the arts into a sustainable career or even an option. I always thought that music would be alongside a job and be a labour of love. I think being taught younger about how to make long-term plans would really help a lot of people to have a feeling that there is support and possibility for their ambitions because a lot of talent goes to waste because people just don’t know how to translate that talent into success.” Why should people support local charities? “Whether you like it or not you are always thinking about your locale and your neighbourhood, you town, your city, your friends… or at least you should be. So whatever you can do to support people within that immediate network is really important Localgiving is an excellent opportunity to do something small that makes a big difference!” Find out more about Bright Light Bright Light, including his music and his work with Localgiving by following him on twitter @Brightlightx2 and facebook.  And why not take this opportunity to find a charity near you?    
    Sep 20, 2016 1188
  • 23 Aug 2016
    Localgiving has recently released Striking a Match: Incentivised Giving Report 2016. In recent years we have been exploring incentivisation as a way to engage people with their local charities and community groups. In 2015 we gathered these ideas into a coherent calendar programme for the first time. Over the year we ran six match fund campaigns featuring a range of different incentives to encourage donations. These included 1:1 match funding, ‘randomised’ match funding and fundraiser competitions. Striking a Match compares and contrasts these Incentivised Giving Campaigns. Using donation data and donor feedback, this report looks at the impact of each campaign on the overall amount raised; charity and donor participation rates; donation size and frequency; donor sentiment and retention.  This report provides an insight into how financial incentives affect people’s donation decisions. The findings show that different incentives – ranging from match funding to competition prizes – can be used to engage supporters in charitable causes, as well as stimulating higher, more frequent donations. The report finds that: The vast majority of donor survey respondents see campaign incentives as a crucial factor in their decision to donate. In the February 2015 #GiveMe5 survey 83.4% of respondents said that match funding had influenced their decision “a lot” or was the “only reason” that they had donated. Donor surveys show a clear, positive correlation between the likelihood of a donation being matched and the amount donors are willing to donate. Deterministic match funds (in which donations are guaranteed to be matched) see the highest participation levels, but require substantial initial investment in terms of match funding.  Competitions increase the average donation size and provide the best leverage for campaign funders, but show lower participation rates amongst charities. Download the full PDF report Our next national match fund campaign, Grow Your Tenner 2016, will be launching on 18th October and will run for a month or until the match fund runs out. During this campaign Localgiving will be matching monthly donations of up to £10 given to our members for up to three months. Why not take a look at our campaign page to find out how you and your charity can benefit.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmentHow Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity
    1108 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Localgiving has recently released Striking a Match: Incentivised Giving Report 2016. In recent years we have been exploring incentivisation as a way to engage people with their local charities and community groups. In 2015 we gathered these ideas into a coherent calendar programme for the first time. Over the year we ran six match fund campaigns featuring a range of different incentives to encourage donations. These included 1:1 match funding, ‘randomised’ match funding and fundraiser competitions. Striking a Match compares and contrasts these Incentivised Giving Campaigns. Using donation data and donor feedback, this report looks at the impact of each campaign on the overall amount raised; charity and donor participation rates; donation size and frequency; donor sentiment and retention.  This report provides an insight into how financial incentives affect people’s donation decisions. The findings show that different incentives – ranging from match funding to competition prizes – can be used to engage supporters in charitable causes, as well as stimulating higher, more frequent donations. The report finds that: The vast majority of donor survey respondents see campaign incentives as a crucial factor in their decision to donate. In the February 2015 #GiveMe5 survey 83.4% of respondents said that match funding had influenced their decision “a lot” or was the “only reason” that they had donated. Donor surveys show a clear, positive correlation between the likelihood of a donation being matched and the amount donors are willing to donate. Deterministic match funds (in which donations are guaranteed to be matched) see the highest participation levels, but require substantial initial investment in terms of match funding.  Competitions increase the average donation size and provide the best leverage for campaign funders, but show lower participation rates amongst charities. Download the full PDF report Our next national match fund campaign, Grow Your Tenner 2016, will be launching on 18th October and will run for a month or until the match fund runs out. During this campaign Localgiving will be matching monthly donations of up to £10 given to our members for up to three months. Why not take a look at our campaign page to find out how you and your charity can benefit.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmentHow Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity
    Aug 23, 2016 1108
  • 11 Aug 2016
    The new Fundraising Regulator was launched on 7th July 2016. The Fundraising Regulator will set and maintain the standards for charitable fundraising in the United Kingdom – ensuring that fundraising is respectful, open, honest and accountable to the public. This regulator has been formed in the wake of the fundraising scandals that hit the third sector in 2015. It has been tasked with strengthening regulation following widespread public and media concern about how charities contact potential donors. The regulator’s role includes: Setting and promoting the standards for fundraising practice (‘the code’ and associated rulebooks) Investigateing cases where fundraising practices have led to significant public concern Adjudicating complaints from the public about fundraising practice Operate a fundraising preference service In the case of poor fundraising practice, recommending best practice guidance and taking remedial action. At Localgiving we are proud of the high fundraising standards that we set and of the conduct of our members.   Despite trust issues in the wider charity sector, confidence in local, grassroots charities has remained high. To ensure that these high standards are maintained,  we strongly recommend that all Localgiving members: Register with the Fundraising Regulator from Autumn 2016. Although this is voluntary, registering signals commitment to good practice Make sure that you are aware and up to date with the Fundraising Code of Practice. All charities that engage in fundraising come under the remit of the new fundraising regulator and are expected to adhere to the Code of Practice.
  • The new Fundraising Regulator was launched on 7th July 2016. The Fundraising Regulator will set and maintain the standards for charitable fundraising in the United Kingdom – ensuring that fundraising is respectful, open, honest and accountable to the public. This regulator has been formed in the wake of the fundraising scandals that hit the third sector in 2015. It has been tasked with strengthening regulation following widespread public and media concern about how charities contact potential donors. The regulator’s role includes: Setting and promoting the standards for fundraising practice (‘the code’ and associated rulebooks) Investigateing cases where fundraising practices have led to significant public concern Adjudicating complaints from the public about fundraising practice Operate a fundraising preference service In the case of poor fundraising practice, recommending best practice guidance and taking remedial action. At Localgiving we are proud of the high fundraising standards that we set and of the conduct of our members.   Despite trust issues in the wider charity sector, confidence in local, grassroots charities has remained high. To ensure that these high standards are maintained,  we strongly recommend that all Localgiving members: Register with the Fundraising Regulator from Autumn 2016. Although this is voluntary, registering signals commitment to good practice Make sure that you are aware and up to date with the Fundraising Code of Practice. All charities that engage in fundraising come under the remit of the new fundraising regulator and are expected to adhere to the Code of Practice.
    Aug 11, 2016 1213
  • 20 Jul 2016
      Jess is event planner for CharityComms, the membership network for communications professionals working in UK charities. At CharityComms we recognise that smaller charities face different communications challenges. How can you keep up with developments and trends across different communications disciplines when you cover them all? Who do you turn to for input and feedback when you're the only comms specialist in your organisation? And how do you make time for strategy when you may be the only one around to deal with the day-to-day? That’s why we’re delighted to announce the launch of our first dedicated small charities conference on 23 September. This will enable communicators from smaller organisations to connect with peers and access advice and shared experience on how to deliver comms impact with very limited resources. We’ve kept the cost as low as possible to make it accessible – just £80+vat for the full day for CharityComms members, £100+vat for non-members and £160+vat for corporate partners. See the full agenda and book now Understanding the comms needs of small charities Last year, we conducted a survey of small charity communicators to help us better understand their needs. Here’s what we learned: ‘Small’ is a relative term While the majority (64%) were from charities with income between £100k and £1m, 24% were at charities with over £1m turnover. A surprising 7% were from charities with over £5m turnover, but who presumably still considered themselves ‘small’. The NCVO’s Almanac classes a charity over £1m as ‘large’. We’ve targeted our event where we feel we can provide the best support, crucially to organisations which have at least part of a role specifically dedicated to communications. So our ‘small’ charity category encompasses incomes from £100k to £2m, though we reckon any charity of any size with just one person (either full or part-time) doing all the comms work also fits the bill. Training budgets are often the stuff of dreams Two-thirds of our survey respondents depend completely on free support. A quarter had attended no learning outside the office in the last year, and 30 respondents (27%) had attended no training, events or networking at all. This included charities in all size categories, including over £1m. One in three said they learn via networking with peers. Small charity communicators feel isolated Many of the people we spoke to said they felt the lack of a peer group, or of colleagues who understood their work. Said one, ‘I don’t have anyone to bounce ideas around with. My colleagues expect mine to be the last word on communications.’ Skills are missing across PR and digital – and time is always short The most frequently mentioned skills gaps were press and media relations, digital and social media skills and communications strategy, followed by the challenges of getting internal support, and of course, lack of time and resource. Targeted help We’ve developed the agenda for our small charities communications conference on 23 September in response to what we’ve learned, offering:  Expert sessions on some of the key areas raised in our research: strategy, PR, digital, brand and more Structured peer knowledge exchange using the Open Space model (sometimes called ‘unconference’ or ‘Birds of a feather’ sessions) Inspiring ‘Lightning talks’ from small charities doing great comms work on a shoestring What else does CharityComms have to offer small charities The CharityComms website has extensive free resources, including best practice guides to social media, crisis communications and more, and we’re looking at developing an online directory signposting good quality free or low-cost online resources and training opportunities. We’ve recently been awarded funding to provide free media training to small charities. More info on this in due course as we take this initiative forward. Find out more about the CharityComms Small charities communications conference Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha How to make friend with the media by Kay ParrisGet your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield  
    1227 Posted by Jess Day
  •   Jess is event planner for CharityComms, the membership network for communications professionals working in UK charities. At CharityComms we recognise that smaller charities face different communications challenges. How can you keep up with developments and trends across different communications disciplines when you cover them all? Who do you turn to for input and feedback when you're the only comms specialist in your organisation? And how do you make time for strategy when you may be the only one around to deal with the day-to-day? That’s why we’re delighted to announce the launch of our first dedicated small charities conference on 23 September. This will enable communicators from smaller organisations to connect with peers and access advice and shared experience on how to deliver comms impact with very limited resources. We’ve kept the cost as low as possible to make it accessible – just £80+vat for the full day for CharityComms members, £100+vat for non-members and £160+vat for corporate partners. See the full agenda and book now Understanding the comms needs of small charities Last year, we conducted a survey of small charity communicators to help us better understand their needs. Here’s what we learned: ‘Small’ is a relative term While the majority (64%) were from charities with income between £100k and £1m, 24% were at charities with over £1m turnover. A surprising 7% were from charities with over £5m turnover, but who presumably still considered themselves ‘small’. The NCVO’s Almanac classes a charity over £1m as ‘large’. We’ve targeted our event where we feel we can provide the best support, crucially to organisations which have at least part of a role specifically dedicated to communications. So our ‘small’ charity category encompasses incomes from £100k to £2m, though we reckon any charity of any size with just one person (either full or part-time) doing all the comms work also fits the bill. Training budgets are often the stuff of dreams Two-thirds of our survey respondents depend completely on free support. A quarter had attended no learning outside the office in the last year, and 30 respondents (27%) had attended no training, events or networking at all. This included charities in all size categories, including over £1m. One in three said they learn via networking with peers. Small charity communicators feel isolated Many of the people we spoke to said they felt the lack of a peer group, or of colleagues who understood their work. Said one, ‘I don’t have anyone to bounce ideas around with. My colleagues expect mine to be the last word on communications.’ Skills are missing across PR and digital – and time is always short The most frequently mentioned skills gaps were press and media relations, digital and social media skills and communications strategy, followed by the challenges of getting internal support, and of course, lack of time and resource. Targeted help We’ve developed the agenda for our small charities communications conference on 23 September in response to what we’ve learned, offering:  Expert sessions on some of the key areas raised in our research: strategy, PR, digital, brand and more Structured peer knowledge exchange using the Open Space model (sometimes called ‘unconference’ or ‘Birds of a feather’ sessions) Inspiring ‘Lightning talks’ from small charities doing great comms work on a shoestring What else does CharityComms have to offer small charities The CharityComms website has extensive free resources, including best practice guides to social media, crisis communications and more, and we’re looking at developing an online directory signposting good quality free or low-cost online resources and training opportunities. We’ve recently been awarded funding to provide free media training to small charities. More info on this in due course as we take this initiative forward. Find out more about the CharityComms Small charities communications conference Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack 5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha How to make friend with the media by Kay ParrisGet your charity’s voice heard by Duncan Hatfield  
    Jul 20, 2016 1227
  • 11 Jul 2016
    Joe Burns is the North West regional development manager for Localgiving. Before that he was a corporate fundraiser for a national charity, and worked with firms in the FTSE 100 as well as small family run businesses. Just 24 little hours are all some of our groups need to make a real difference in their communities… A few weeks back Localgiving formally ‘launched’ its regional development programme in the North West. To mark the launch we attended  a pond building session run by the Manchester social enterprise Sow the City, who were building the pond as part of Manchester City Council’s “Growing Manchester” initiative. To the uninitiated, a pond building session might seem like a small thing. But just by focusing on this one activity, we can get a real sense of the good work local charities do every day, the seemingly little things which can make a real difference.   For this was no ordinary pond, and this was no ordinary exercise in pond building either. For this pond was being built at a care and respite centre in Baguley, catering for adults with long term mental disabilities. Those of us who have never used or visited care centres may think of them as  dull, depressing places. Nothing could be further from the truth. Residents are encouraged to take part in a range of activities, activities which help to build a sense of community and fun. Of the many activities this care centre provides, one of the most popular is a green fingered gardening club for residents. This club has developed an overgrown garden into a veritable Eden in a few short years. It was for this reason that we were there building our pond. First and foremost, this pond building was an opportunity to further develop a green space used by all the residents; a chance to make the centre an even more pleasant place to be. A good wildlife pond acts as a magnet to a whole host of creatures and plants. And so, a small patch of Baguley is now teeming with greenery and life which wasn’t there only 24 hours earlier. Perhaps even more importantly, this was a chance for residents to get stuck in. A chance for them to get their hands dirty, to get a bit of exercise, to have a bit of banter, and a chance to learn a bit more about nature - a chance many residents took with aplomb! Building that pond turned a fairly mundane Wednesday into something memorable, something enjoyable and fun. And the pond was theirs. They had helped to build it, and in less than a day too. One pond building activity, taking place over one day. We see something that looks, on the surface, small and inconsequential. But like the ripples of a pebble dropped in water, the good vibrations spread out beyond that one day into an entire community. This is just one example I’ve seen amongst many with the groups we support on Localgiving. They all make real, lasting differences – and this is why local charities not only need, but in fact they deserve and demand our support.  Want to make a difference in less than 24 hours? You could do a lot worse than to donate to one of our charities.     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:  Corporate Fundraising for local charitiesHow small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmenThe Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker  
    1079 Posted by Joe Burns
  • Joe Burns is the North West regional development manager for Localgiving. Before that he was a corporate fundraiser for a national charity, and worked with firms in the FTSE 100 as well as small family run businesses. Just 24 little hours are all some of our groups need to make a real difference in their communities… A few weeks back Localgiving formally ‘launched’ its regional development programme in the North West. To mark the launch we attended  a pond building session run by the Manchester social enterprise Sow the City, who were building the pond as part of Manchester City Council’s “Growing Manchester” initiative. To the uninitiated, a pond building session might seem like a small thing. But just by focusing on this one activity, we can get a real sense of the good work local charities do every day, the seemingly little things which can make a real difference.   For this was no ordinary pond, and this was no ordinary exercise in pond building either. For this pond was being built at a care and respite centre in Baguley, catering for adults with long term mental disabilities. Those of us who have never used or visited care centres may think of them as  dull, depressing places. Nothing could be further from the truth. Residents are encouraged to take part in a range of activities, activities which help to build a sense of community and fun. Of the many activities this care centre provides, one of the most popular is a green fingered gardening club for residents. This club has developed an overgrown garden into a veritable Eden in a few short years. It was for this reason that we were there building our pond. First and foremost, this pond building was an opportunity to further develop a green space used by all the residents; a chance to make the centre an even more pleasant place to be. A good wildlife pond acts as a magnet to a whole host of creatures and plants. And so, a small patch of Baguley is now teeming with greenery and life which wasn’t there only 24 hours earlier. Perhaps even more importantly, this was a chance for residents to get stuck in. A chance for them to get their hands dirty, to get a bit of exercise, to have a bit of banter, and a chance to learn a bit more about nature - a chance many residents took with aplomb! Building that pond turned a fairly mundane Wednesday into something memorable, something enjoyable and fun. And the pond was theirs. They had helped to build it, and in less than a day too. One pond building activity, taking place over one day. We see something that looks, on the surface, small and inconsequential. But like the ripples of a pebble dropped in water, the good vibrations spread out beyond that one day into an entire community. This is just one example I’ve seen amongst many with the groups we support on Localgiving. They all make real, lasting differences – and this is why local charities not only need, but in fact they deserve and demand our support.  Want to make a difference in less than 24 hours? You could do a lot worse than to donate to one of our charities.     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:  Corporate Fundraising for local charitiesHow small charities can overcome barriers to brand investmenThe Power of the Twitter Hour by Richard Barker  
    Jul 11, 2016 1079
  • 27 Jun 2016
    If your local newspaper were to offer your charity a free centre page spread, you’d jump at the chance. Who wouldn’t? Google have been offering charities the online equivalent for over 13 years. If you haven’t already, here’s how to make the most out of this opportunity. So, what is AdWords? When looking to find a service, a club or an activity what is the first thing we do? These days the vast majority of people would start with a Google search. It is therefore essential that your group appears on the first page of a Google search for your activity or services. Google AdWords is an advertising service designed to make this happen. Google Adwords ensures that display ads will appear for people searching for charities or groups like you.   It’s FREE! Through its Ad Grants programme, Google gives non-profit organisations $10,000 (£6,600) worth of free ads per month to promote their mission, services and harness new supporters, volunteers and donors via Google search. For charities that provide exceptional account management and can demonstrate a history of being able to meet account criteria, there is an opportunity for them to apply and receive ‘Google Grants Pro’ status benefiting from $40,000 (£26,500) per month of digital spend to use within Google search. If you already have a Google Grant, Receptional can help you increase your results - scroll down to the end of this article to find out how. How do we get started? It's easy to get started with Google Ad Grants. Firstly, you need to check your eligibility and sign up. Google provide clear instructions as to how to do this HERE. Once you’ve signed up, here are the 4 key steps you need to know: A) Think of the ‘keywords’ that describe your charity – these should be words that describe your cause and activities. Try to think of synonyms, too! B) Decide where people will see your adverts – as a local charity you may choose to restrict your adverts to your specific geographical area to ensure your adverts have maximum impact. A person in Boston, US is unlikely to be able to attend your activity in Boston, Lincolnshire! C) Write some clear, punchy content about your charity with a link to your donation page, website or campaign. D)  Decide how much of the grant money to ‘pay’ each time someone clicks through to your website via the link (a maximum of $2). Of course, the best results are delivered by companies that are Google Qualified. To fully benefit  from Google Adwords it would be recommended to use a resource that understands the more complicated aspects of the service - Bid Capping, Quality Score and how to compete with other charities that are also running the Google Grants programme. Need extra help? Receptional is a digital agency that works with a range of charitable organisations, both small and large for helping set up a Google Grant to assisting with management. They offer: Free advice for those charities that are interested in applying for a Google Grant and for charities that currently run a Google Grant but want to achieve better results, a free no obligation health check that provides clear actionable advice. Want more information? Why not contact Receptional for your Free Google Grant Health check today? Rob Bradley - Benefiting from a broad digital background encompassing start-up, professional services, business management and culminating with running a Digital Agency overseas Rob is a creative analyst at heart that enjoys helping organisations and Charities gain market share, increase their point of difference and improve their digital ROI. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandHow Charities can tap into the hyperlocal by Zoe Amar  
    2700 Posted by Rob Bradley
  • If your local newspaper were to offer your charity a free centre page spread, you’d jump at the chance. Who wouldn’t? Google have been offering charities the online equivalent for over 13 years. If you haven’t already, here’s how to make the most out of this opportunity. So, what is AdWords? When looking to find a service, a club or an activity what is the first thing we do? These days the vast majority of people would start with a Google search. It is therefore essential that your group appears on the first page of a Google search for your activity or services. Google AdWords is an advertising service designed to make this happen. Google Adwords ensures that display ads will appear for people searching for charities or groups like you.   It’s FREE! Through its Ad Grants programme, Google gives non-profit organisations $10,000 (£6,600) worth of free ads per month to promote their mission, services and harness new supporters, volunteers and donors via Google search. For charities that provide exceptional account management and can demonstrate a history of being able to meet account criteria, there is an opportunity for them to apply and receive ‘Google Grants Pro’ status benefiting from $40,000 (£26,500) per month of digital spend to use within Google search. If you already have a Google Grant, Receptional can help you increase your results - scroll down to the end of this article to find out how. How do we get started? It's easy to get started with Google Ad Grants. Firstly, you need to check your eligibility and sign up. Google provide clear instructions as to how to do this HERE. Once you’ve signed up, here are the 4 key steps you need to know: A) Think of the ‘keywords’ that describe your charity – these should be words that describe your cause and activities. Try to think of synonyms, too! B) Decide where people will see your adverts – as a local charity you may choose to restrict your adverts to your specific geographical area to ensure your adverts have maximum impact. A person in Boston, US is unlikely to be able to attend your activity in Boston, Lincolnshire! C) Write some clear, punchy content about your charity with a link to your donation page, website or campaign. D)  Decide how much of the grant money to ‘pay’ each time someone clicks through to your website via the link (a maximum of $2). Of course, the best results are delivered by companies that are Google Qualified. To fully benefit  from Google Adwords it would be recommended to use a resource that understands the more complicated aspects of the service - Bid Capping, Quality Score and how to compete with other charities that are also running the Google Grants programme. Need extra help? Receptional is a digital agency that works with a range of charitable organisations, both small and large for helping set up a Google Grant to assisting with management. They offer: Free advice for those charities that are interested in applying for a Google Grant and for charities that currently run a Google Grant but want to achieve better results, a free no obligation health check that provides clear actionable advice. Want more information? Why not contact Receptional for your Free Google Grant Health check today? Rob Bradley - Benefiting from a broad digital background encompassing start-up, professional services, business management and culminating with running a Digital Agency overseas Rob is a creative analyst at heart that enjoys helping organisations and Charities gain market share, increase their point of difference and improve their digital ROI. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Power of Storytelling: Six Top Tips by Mike Zywina  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandHow Charities can tap into the hyperlocal by Zoe Amar  
    Jun 27, 2016 2700
  • 13 Jun 2016
    Small Charity Week is here!  Over 95% of Localgiving’s members are small or micro charities.  We know better than anyone the inherent value of grassroots groups.   We are in the privileged position of hearing and seeing the positive impact that these groups make on their communities – every day in countless ways.   This morning alone I have been talking to a Darlington based group set up to save their local bowling green, a Swindon charity using theatre to change attitudes to refugees and a fans-owned football club in Scarborough. These are hugely different initiatives, with hugely different missions. What they all have in common however is an acute understanding of the needs of their communities and a genuine passion for improving the lives of those around them. Small Charity Week is about getting these small, local groups the exposure and acclaim they deserve.   So, how can you get involved? 1)      Find a small charity near you and spread the word about their cause and services.  Its easy to find a group in your area on Localgiving.org. Once you’ve found a group that inspires you, why not inspire your friends or colleagues too. Search for a Charity  2)      Donate! We’re running a #GiveMe5 match fund on Fundraising Day - Thursday the 16th June. We will be doubling 1,000 x £5 donations made through localgiving.org on the day. Our last #GiveMe5 campaign, held on Giving Tuesday 2015, raised over £36k for 548 charities in 24 hours.  Can you spare a fiver to support that inspirational group you just found? Small charities need your support. 3)      Look ahead -  Small charity week is about far more than 7 fun filled days. Think about what you can do to help grassroots charities in future. Can you offer your skills through volunteering? Could you provide ongoing financial support by setting up a direct debit? Do you know other people who would be interested in the work of the charity?   Our advice for small charity week is simple: discover, donate, and inspire!    Image (top SNAP- Special Needs and Parents, bottom  North Wilts Holiday Club for Children & Young People with Special Needs)   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    1133 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Small Charity Week is here!  Over 95% of Localgiving’s members are small or micro charities.  We know better than anyone the inherent value of grassroots groups.   We are in the privileged position of hearing and seeing the positive impact that these groups make on their communities – every day in countless ways.   This morning alone I have been talking to a Darlington based group set up to save their local bowling green, a Swindon charity using theatre to change attitudes to refugees and a fans-owned football club in Scarborough. These are hugely different initiatives, with hugely different missions. What they all have in common however is an acute understanding of the needs of their communities and a genuine passion for improving the lives of those around them. Small Charity Week is about getting these small, local groups the exposure and acclaim they deserve.   So, how can you get involved? 1)      Find a small charity near you and spread the word about their cause and services.  Its easy to find a group in your area on Localgiving.org. Once you’ve found a group that inspires you, why not inspire your friends or colleagues too. Search for a Charity  2)      Donate! We’re running a #GiveMe5 match fund on Fundraising Day - Thursday the 16th June. We will be doubling 1,000 x £5 donations made through localgiving.org on the day. Our last #GiveMe5 campaign, held on Giving Tuesday 2015, raised over £36k for 548 charities in 24 hours.  Can you spare a fiver to support that inspirational group you just found? Small charities need your support. 3)      Look ahead -  Small charity week is about far more than 7 fun filled days. Think about what you can do to help grassroots charities in future. Can you offer your skills through volunteering? Could you provide ongoing financial support by setting up a direct debit? Do you know other people who would be interested in the work of the charity?   Our advice for small charity week is simple: discover, donate, and inspire!    Image (top SNAP- Special Needs and Parents, bottom  North Wilts Holiday Club for Children & Young People with Special Needs)   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount Kilimanjaro  
    Jun 13, 2016 1133
  • 01 Apr 2016
    From the BBC’s Spaghetti trees to the ‘Taco’ Liberty Bell, April 1st is the annual day for the jokers and japers in our ranks.  Today also marks the start of our first campaign of the year, Local Hero 2016. No joke! Local Hero, which will run until 30th April, recognises the incredible work put in by fundraisers, from the arty to the athletic to the absurd.  All participants need to do is think up a challenge, set up a fundraising page and persuade as many people as possible to donate. Throughout April all fundraisers will be ranked according to the number of unique online donors who sponsor their page. At the end of the campaign £5,000 in prizes will be awarded to the causes supported by the top 20 fundraisers, with a top prize of £1,000 going to the cause of the fundraiser who has secured the most donors. Local Hero 2015 saw nearly 300 fundraisers raise over £80,000 in donations, prizes and Gift Aid from over 2,500 donors. We would like to give a huge thanks to Making a Difference Locally for funding Local Hero 2016. Additional thanks to Lord David Puttnam and intu for their support for the campaign. So, get involved now - you’d be a fool to miss out! And to put a grin on your face, here are some of the best & worst pranks of the day so far: East London Pop-up to sell water from river Thames The Royal Albert Hall to become mini-Hadron Collider Marco Biagi of the SNP starts his campaign for mayor of London  Scotland and Wales to form own country of Britain votes to leave the EU German Embassy enveil hens that lay 'rugby-eggs' Equal Rights for Left Pits- says Right Guard  
  • From the BBC’s Spaghetti trees to the ‘Taco’ Liberty Bell, April 1st is the annual day for the jokers and japers in our ranks.  Today also marks the start of our first campaign of the year, Local Hero 2016. No joke! Local Hero, which will run until 30th April, recognises the incredible work put in by fundraisers, from the arty to the athletic to the absurd.  All participants need to do is think up a challenge, set up a fundraising page and persuade as many people as possible to donate. Throughout April all fundraisers will be ranked according to the number of unique online donors who sponsor their page. At the end of the campaign £5,000 in prizes will be awarded to the causes supported by the top 20 fundraisers, with a top prize of £1,000 going to the cause of the fundraiser who has secured the most donors. Local Hero 2015 saw nearly 300 fundraisers raise over £80,000 in donations, prizes and Gift Aid from over 2,500 donors. We would like to give a huge thanks to Making a Difference Locally for funding Local Hero 2016. Additional thanks to Lord David Puttnam and intu for their support for the campaign. So, get involved now - you’d be a fool to miss out! And to put a grin on your face, here are some of the best & worst pranks of the day so far: East London Pop-up to sell water from river Thames The Royal Albert Hall to become mini-Hadron Collider Marco Biagi of the SNP starts his campaign for mayor of London  Scotland and Wales to form own country of Britain votes to leave the EU German Embassy enveil hens that lay 'rugby-eggs' Equal Rights for Left Pits- says Right Guard  
    Apr 01, 2016 1214
  • 22 Mar 2016
    United Way UK has announced two new grants for Spring 2016, Give Local and Community Impact. United Way UK collaborates with businesses and community partners in the voluntary sector to achieve positive change in education, income stability and health. Community Impact Grants There are 3 Community Impact Grants of £10,000 each These grants are aimed at increasing opportunities for disadvantaged children and young people. All proposed programmes should have a positive impact on educational attainment, including (but not limited to): Programmes encouraging healthier early childhood development for disadvantaged children (ages 0-8) with a focus on school readiness & success, language acquisition, and nutrition The development of numeracy and literacy skills for disadvantaged children of all ages (up to age 18) Increasing the employability of disadvantaged young people (ages 12-24) through the development of soft or hard skills outside of school   Give Local Grants There are 28 Give Local Grants of £1,000 each These grants are open to community based groups working in education, income stability and/or health.Applicants should: Demonstrate an understanding of local needs and solutions (within their geographic area)  Demonstrate the impact donors can have on causes local to their own homes/places of work Support the most disadvantaged or otherwise socially excluded     United Way UK often develops long term relationships with its community partners. It therefore favours projects with  the potential for scalability and/or replicability in other communities or regions. For further details including eligibility requirements and downloadable application forms please visithttp://www.unitedway.org.uk/grants
  • United Way UK has announced two new grants for Spring 2016, Give Local and Community Impact. United Way UK collaborates with businesses and community partners in the voluntary sector to achieve positive change in education, income stability and health. Community Impact Grants There are 3 Community Impact Grants of £10,000 each These grants are aimed at increasing opportunities for disadvantaged children and young people. All proposed programmes should have a positive impact on educational attainment, including (but not limited to): Programmes encouraging healthier early childhood development for disadvantaged children (ages 0-8) with a focus on school readiness & success, language acquisition, and nutrition The development of numeracy and literacy skills for disadvantaged children of all ages (up to age 18) Increasing the employability of disadvantaged young people (ages 12-24) through the development of soft or hard skills outside of school   Give Local Grants There are 28 Give Local Grants of £1,000 each These grants are open to community based groups working in education, income stability and/or health.Applicants should: Demonstrate an understanding of local needs and solutions (within their geographic area)  Demonstrate the impact donors can have on causes local to their own homes/places of work Support the most disadvantaged or otherwise socially excluded     United Way UK often develops long term relationships with its community partners. It therefore favours projects with  the potential for scalability and/or replicability in other communities or regions. For further details including eligibility requirements and downloadable application forms please visithttp://www.unitedway.org.uk/grants
    Mar 22, 2016 1682
  • 09 Mar 2016
    It's here! After months of development, design, copywriting and editing - everyone at Localgiving is delighted to announce the launch of our brand new website! In this blog we explain both what has changed and why we have made these updates. We hope that you like the new site and find it simple and more intuitive to use. As with any big change, we're sure there will be a few bumps along the way. Some things may take us a little longer to migrate over, so we thank you for your patience whilst we complete the switch! As ever, your feedback is welcomed, so please let us know any thoughts you have about the new site by dropping an email to help@localgiving.org.      So what's changed? .COM to .ORG - As a part of the revamp, we have migrated our domain from Localgiving.com to Localgiving.org. We've made this switch to reflect who we are - a not-for-profit organisation with charitable rather than commercial goals. We've set up automatic redirecting, so that all existing links to charity and fundraising pages will continue to go to the right place without you needing to change a thing. Whenever a supporter uses a localgiving.com URL, they will automatically be redirected to localgiving.org. All charity pages, buttons, appeals and fundraisers pages will also continue to work as before.  Improved search – Our new predictive search tool enables users on the site to find the results they're looking for more quickly and easily. Search by location or keyword to find local charities, fundraisers, projects and appeals.     Refined donation flow – We've improved the donation process to make it quicker and easier for people to donate to their charity of choice, as well as making it simpler to set up a monthly donation. For more detailed information about the changes, please read our step-by-step guide to the new donation flow.     A fresh modern look – Times change, fashions move on, and expectations are constantly being raised when it comes to website layout and design. Our fresh look introduces some of the latest design best-practice to our website. The new site is fully responsive, meaning that content adapts according to the size of your screen and displays across all devices (desktops, tablets, and phones). We have also tweaked our colour palette to deliver improved accessibility for partially-sighted people. New navigation bar – A big part of the new site design is an improved navigation bar at the top of each page. We have restructured our site menu to make it easier for all users to access the content they need, be it information on our charitable mission, programmes or contact details.     Updated content – We have updated much of the content across the website. You can now view all upcoming campaigns; plan ahead with our events calendar; find out more about Localgiving's mission and current programmes; as well as read and share our recent blogs and reports. Members can also access exclusive fundraising materials from within their accounts. Updated 'Terms of Service' – To ensure all of our legal information is as clear and easy to understand as possible, we have consolidated our terms and conditions into a single Terms of Service and a Privacy Policy, both of which apply to all users. Please let us know if you have any concerns about our updated terms and we will be happy to help.  Featured charities and fundraisers – Our member's campaigns, stories and images are the lifeblood of Localgiving. We'll be featuring new groups every few weeks, so if you'd like the chance for your organisation to be shown on the homepage, then drop us an email with a few sentences explaining why!      ...and what hasn't changed? Once logged in, everything within your Localgiving account will work in exactly the same way as before. The processes for logging-in, downloading reports and resources and viewing donations are all unchanged. All links to your existing pages (including buttons) will continue to work without the need to update your URLs.    Your opinion matters We value your opinion and welcome your comments. You can call us on 0300 111 2340 or contact help@localgiving.org if you have any feedback or questions about these changes. Many thanks for your support and we look forward to hearing from you.
  • It's here! After months of development, design, copywriting and editing - everyone at Localgiving is delighted to announce the launch of our brand new website! In this blog we explain both what has changed and why we have made these updates. We hope that you like the new site and find it simple and more intuitive to use. As with any big change, we're sure there will be a few bumps along the way. Some things may take us a little longer to migrate over, so we thank you for your patience whilst we complete the switch! As ever, your feedback is welcomed, so please let us know any thoughts you have about the new site by dropping an email to help@localgiving.org.      So what's changed? .COM to .ORG - As a part of the revamp, we have migrated our domain from Localgiving.com to Localgiving.org. We've made this switch to reflect who we are - a not-for-profit organisation with charitable rather than commercial goals. We've set up automatic redirecting, so that all existing links to charity and fundraising pages will continue to go to the right place without you needing to change a thing. Whenever a supporter uses a localgiving.com URL, they will automatically be redirected to localgiving.org. All charity pages, buttons, appeals and fundraisers pages will also continue to work as before.  Improved search – Our new predictive search tool enables users on the site to find the results they're looking for more quickly and easily. Search by location or keyword to find local charities, fundraisers, projects and appeals.     Refined donation flow – We've improved the donation process to make it quicker and easier for people to donate to their charity of choice, as well as making it simpler to set up a monthly donation. For more detailed information about the changes, please read our step-by-step guide to the new donation flow.     A fresh modern look – Times change, fashions move on, and expectations are constantly being raised when it comes to website layout and design. Our fresh look introduces some of the latest design best-practice to our website. The new site is fully responsive, meaning that content adapts according to the size of your screen and displays across all devices (desktops, tablets, and phones). We have also tweaked our colour palette to deliver improved accessibility for partially-sighted people. New navigation bar – A big part of the new site design is an improved navigation bar at the top of each page. We have restructured our site menu to make it easier for all users to access the content they need, be it information on our charitable mission, programmes or contact details.     Updated content – We have updated much of the content across the website. You can now view all upcoming campaigns; plan ahead with our events calendar; find out more about Localgiving's mission and current programmes; as well as read and share our recent blogs and reports. Members can also access exclusive fundraising materials from within their accounts. Updated 'Terms of Service' – To ensure all of our legal information is as clear and easy to understand as possible, we have consolidated our terms and conditions into a single Terms of Service and a Privacy Policy, both of which apply to all users. Please let us know if you have any concerns about our updated terms and we will be happy to help.  Featured charities and fundraisers – Our member's campaigns, stories and images are the lifeblood of Localgiving. We'll be featuring new groups every few weeks, so if you'd like the chance for your organisation to be shown on the homepage, then drop us an email with a few sentences explaining why!      ...and what hasn't changed? Once logged in, everything within your Localgiving account will work in exactly the same way as before. The processes for logging-in, downloading reports and resources and viewing donations are all unchanged. All links to your existing pages (including buttons) will continue to work without the need to update your URLs.    Your opinion matters We value your opinion and welcome your comments. You can call us on 0300 111 2340 or contact help@localgiving.org if you have any feedback or questions about these changes. Many thanks for your support and we look forward to hearing from you.
    Mar 09, 2016 1360