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  • 18 Jan 2019
      Dorset Parent Infant Partnership have just launched a new appeal on Localgiving! DorPIP work to ensure that parents and babies can access the support they need to build secure, long-term attachments. This includes providing psychotherapeutic intervention and promoting the importance of investment in early relationship building between parents and their children. As Vivian Allen, the founder and CEO of Dorset Parent Infant Partnership explains: "After 10 years of working as a counsellor, helping children, teenagers and adults who suffer from the effects of poor attachment, I started to look at where their pain had begun and often found it started right at the very beginning of life during the first 1001 critical days, when ‘natural bonding’ should have taken place. Having also experienced problems bonding with my own children i was inspired to set up a specialist community based preventative service to help families when bonding does not come naturally”.   They need to raise a total of £3,600 to run their our #keepintouch groups. These groups ensure that families receive ongoing specialist support during the vital first 2 years of a child’s life. “This support is good for babies, good for families and good for our society too. Please donate now to our appeal. These #keepintouch groups are a lifeline to parents and babies who really need your support." Help DorPIP to continue to provide this invaluable service to parents and babies in Dorset: Make a donation here      
    293 Posted by Conor Kelly
  •   Dorset Parent Infant Partnership have just launched a new appeal on Localgiving! DorPIP work to ensure that parents and babies can access the support they need to build secure, long-term attachments. This includes providing psychotherapeutic intervention and promoting the importance of investment in early relationship building between parents and their children. As Vivian Allen, the founder and CEO of Dorset Parent Infant Partnership explains: "After 10 years of working as a counsellor, helping children, teenagers and adults who suffer from the effects of poor attachment, I started to look at where their pain had begun and often found it started right at the very beginning of life during the first 1001 critical days, when ‘natural bonding’ should have taken place. Having also experienced problems bonding with my own children i was inspired to set up a specialist community based preventative service to help families when bonding does not come naturally”.   They need to raise a total of £3,600 to run their our #keepintouch groups. These groups ensure that families receive ongoing specialist support during the vital first 2 years of a child’s life. “This support is good for babies, good for families and good for our society too. Please donate now to our appeal. These #keepintouch groups are a lifeline to parents and babies who really need your support." Help DorPIP to continue to provide this invaluable service to parents and babies in Dorset: Make a donation here      
    Jan 18, 2019 293
  • 13 Nov 2018
    At Localgiving we like to highlight the inspirational challenges individual fundraisers carry out for our amazing charities and community groups. Every month I (Byron,Localgiving’s Membership Coordinator and helpline guy) will be picking out some of the very best active fundraisers on the platform. Here are some of the most inspiring causes and fundraising appeals we have seen this month.     The Upper Room (St Saviour's) Santa 5k fun run If you love dressing up and like moderate exercise, why not combine the two and do the Santa Winter fun run for a great cause. Matthew and Anna are doing exactly that whilst raising money for the Upper Room. Best of luck with it - I am sure you guys will ‘Blitzen’ it!   The Upper Room ( St.Saviour's) served 26,000 meals last year to the homeless. They have also helped 144 ex-offenders obtain a driving licence. In the last 3 years they have helped place over 200 people in full-time employment.   YMCA Manchester  You may have heard of a few big names in the wrestling world - John Cena, Dwayne Johnson and The Undertaker. But nothing compares to John Cooper, who for his 70th Birthday bouted with 70 people to raise money for YMCA Manchester. The YMCA was established in 1846 and is one of the oldest YMCA's in the world. They are proud to advocate the needs of the most vulnerable and marginalised young people, and are committed to piloting new projects which engage young people and allow them to find their voice within their communities.     Sleep out 2018- St Petroc’s Society  Ever wanted to swap your comfy, warm and dry house (unless it is a student house) for the cold damp floor! No well, St Petroc’s amazing fundraisers did. This sleep-out raises hundreds of pounds every year. I didn't think it was fair to pick out a single fundraising page. Instead I wanted to say a collective thank you and well done to everyone taking part in the event. St Petroc’s mission is to provide accommodation, support and advice to the single homeless of Cornwall. Often falling outside the responsibility of statutory authorities, the single homeless often are sleeping rough and may have a range of difficulties, including mental ill health, relationship breakdown, drug or alcohol dependency, or an offending lifestyle which contribute to their homelessness and social exclusion. St Petroc's provide a diverse range of services for this particular group.    If these fundraisers have inspired you as much as they have us, why not set up a fundraising page and start fundraising for a local group you love today?
    1083 Posted by Byron Geldard
  • At Localgiving we like to highlight the inspirational challenges individual fundraisers carry out for our amazing charities and community groups. Every month I (Byron,Localgiving’s Membership Coordinator and helpline guy) will be picking out some of the very best active fundraisers on the platform. Here are some of the most inspiring causes and fundraising appeals we have seen this month.     The Upper Room (St Saviour's) Santa 5k fun run If you love dressing up and like moderate exercise, why not combine the two and do the Santa Winter fun run for a great cause. Matthew and Anna are doing exactly that whilst raising money for the Upper Room. Best of luck with it - I am sure you guys will ‘Blitzen’ it!   The Upper Room ( St.Saviour's) served 26,000 meals last year to the homeless. They have also helped 144 ex-offenders obtain a driving licence. In the last 3 years they have helped place over 200 people in full-time employment.   YMCA Manchester  You may have heard of a few big names in the wrestling world - John Cena, Dwayne Johnson and The Undertaker. But nothing compares to John Cooper, who for his 70th Birthday bouted with 70 people to raise money for YMCA Manchester. The YMCA was established in 1846 and is one of the oldest YMCA's in the world. They are proud to advocate the needs of the most vulnerable and marginalised young people, and are committed to piloting new projects which engage young people and allow them to find their voice within their communities.     Sleep out 2018- St Petroc’s Society  Ever wanted to swap your comfy, warm and dry house (unless it is a student house) for the cold damp floor! No well, St Petroc’s amazing fundraisers did. This sleep-out raises hundreds of pounds every year. I didn't think it was fair to pick out a single fundraising page. Instead I wanted to say a collective thank you and well done to everyone taking part in the event. St Petroc’s mission is to provide accommodation, support and advice to the single homeless of Cornwall. Often falling outside the responsibility of statutory authorities, the single homeless often are sleeping rough and may have a range of difficulties, including mental ill health, relationship breakdown, drug or alcohol dependency, or an offending lifestyle which contribute to their homelessness and social exclusion. St Petroc's provide a diverse range of services for this particular group.    If these fundraisers have inspired you as much as they have us, why not set up a fundraising page and start fundraising for a local group you love today?
    Nov 13, 2018 1083
  • 05 Jul 2018
    Amid the special edition rainbow bank cards and coffee cups, it is very easy to forget that today’s Pride celebrations have their roots in the Stonewall riots and the wider fight for justice for LGBTQI+people. There is no doubt that there have been incredible strides forward for LGBTQI+ rights over the last quarter of a century  – indeed the very fact that is has become so beneficial for big business to show its support for Pride is testament to how far we have come. However, we must not be fooled into believing the fight is in any way won. Homosexuality remains illegal in 74 countries, while hate crime and day-to-day prejudice remain issues even in the most progressive countries. Within the UK, one particularly pressing issue is the fight to protect the rights and ensure the wellbeing of LGBTQI+ asylum seekers. This week, I spoke to Leila Zadah of the UK  Lesbian & Gay Immigration Group (UKLGIG) about their work to support LGBTQI+ asylum seekers and  advocate for their needs and rights. What is UKLGIG's mission and what support do you provide to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers?  "Our mission is to support LGBTQI+ through the asylum process. We are the only charity in the UK that provides specialist support services, legal advice and information, and conducts policy and advocacy work. We provide psychosocial and practical support to LGBTQI+ people throughout the asylum process. We also provide specialist legal advice and information. We visit LGBTQI+ people if they are claiming asylum and have been placed in a detention centre. We also advocate for changes in Home Office policy and practice, including an improvement in the quality of decision-making in asylum claims based on sexual orientation or gender identity, an end to the detention of LGBTQI+ people and safer accommodation." How many  LGBTQI+ people seek asylum in the UK per year and where do the majority of these claims come from? "Home Office figures published in November 2018 revealed that around 2,000 people apply for asylum each year because of their sexual orientation. Most applications are from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nigeria. The Home Office data did not include claims on the basis of gender identity but they have committee to publishing that data in future." Why do LGBTQI+ people need specific support through the asylum process? In what way does the UK asylum system  disadvantage LGBTQI+ people? "LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum are invariably highly marginalised in society. They may have been rejected by their families, friends and communities because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. They often wish to avoid places where other people from their home countries are present for fear of discrimination or harassment; and they are not always welcome in LGBTQI+ spaces because of racism or their immigration status. Many experience feelings of profound shame and/or internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia. Many have also experienced psychological, physical or sexual violence. They often have low self-esteem and low confidence, which impact on their ability to present their asylum claims. Most mainstream refugee organisations do not provide specific services to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers or information tailored to their needs. Claiming asylum on the basis of your sexual orientation or gender identity is inherently difficult. To be recognised as a refugee, you have to show that you have a well-founded fear of persecution. If your fear of persecution is based on your sexual orientation or gender identity, you also have to prove that you are lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, trans or intersex. This would be difficult for any person, but it is even harder if you have been trying to hide your sexual orientation or gender identity because your family, society or country won’t accept it and may harm you. It is also very difficult to overcome feelings of shame and internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia to be able to talk about your identity – particularly if any discussion of sexuality is taboo in your culture – to a figure of authority who is going to decide if you can stay in the country. Unfortunately, sometimes asylum decision-makers in the Home Office use stereotypes to try to decide if someone is LGBTQI+. Sometimes they don’t recognise the importance of cultural context. One caseworker in the Home Office once said that to try to establish someone’s sexual orientation they would “look at how they’ve explored their sexuality in a cultural context – reading Oscar Wilde perhaps, films and music”. UKLGIG is releasing a report later this month that looks at the reasons why LGBTQI+ asylum claims are rejected. People can receive it by signing up to our newsletter or following us on social media (see below). People who are seeking asylum are not allowed to work. If they need accommodation, the government will normally provide a shared room in a shared house. LGBTQI+ people in shared asylum accommodation often experience discrimination, harassment and abuse from their housemates.  People who are seeking asylum can also be held in immigration detention centres. LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum find themselves trapped among people who may exhibit the same prejudices and discrimination towards them as people in the country from which they are fleeing. Our joint research with Stonewall, No Safe Refuge, showed that they experience harassment and abuse as a result. Many suffer long-lasting effects on their mental health." What are you doing to celebrate Pride 2018 and can people join you? "We will be marching at Pride in London on Sat 7 July. We also have a joint event the Amnesty UK LGBTI Network and African Rainbow Family at UK Black Pride on Sunday 8 July." How can people support your work in future?  We are always looking for Volunteers and you can Donate Here. If you’d like to be involved in our governance, you can become a Member of UKLGIG. Download a form Here.   People can also: Visit our website Sign up for our newsletter  Follow us on Twitter @uklgig Like our Facebook page 
    2025 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Amid the special edition rainbow bank cards and coffee cups, it is very easy to forget that today’s Pride celebrations have their roots in the Stonewall riots and the wider fight for justice for LGBTQI+people. There is no doubt that there have been incredible strides forward for LGBTQI+ rights over the last quarter of a century  – indeed the very fact that is has become so beneficial for big business to show its support for Pride is testament to how far we have come. However, we must not be fooled into believing the fight is in any way won. Homosexuality remains illegal in 74 countries, while hate crime and day-to-day prejudice remain issues even in the most progressive countries. Within the UK, one particularly pressing issue is the fight to protect the rights and ensure the wellbeing of LGBTQI+ asylum seekers. This week, I spoke to Leila Zadah of the UK  Lesbian & Gay Immigration Group (UKLGIG) about their work to support LGBTQI+ asylum seekers and  advocate for their needs and rights. What is UKLGIG's mission and what support do you provide to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers?  "Our mission is to support LGBTQI+ through the asylum process. We are the only charity in the UK that provides specialist support services, legal advice and information, and conducts policy and advocacy work. We provide psychosocial and practical support to LGBTQI+ people throughout the asylum process. We also provide specialist legal advice and information. We visit LGBTQI+ people if they are claiming asylum and have been placed in a detention centre. We also advocate for changes in Home Office policy and practice, including an improvement in the quality of decision-making in asylum claims based on sexual orientation or gender identity, an end to the detention of LGBTQI+ people and safer accommodation." How many  LGBTQI+ people seek asylum in the UK per year and where do the majority of these claims come from? "Home Office figures published in November 2018 revealed that around 2,000 people apply for asylum each year because of their sexual orientation. Most applications are from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nigeria. The Home Office data did not include claims on the basis of gender identity but they have committee to publishing that data in future." Why do LGBTQI+ people need specific support through the asylum process? In what way does the UK asylum system  disadvantage LGBTQI+ people? "LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum are invariably highly marginalised in society. They may have been rejected by their families, friends and communities because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. They often wish to avoid places where other people from their home countries are present for fear of discrimination or harassment; and they are not always welcome in LGBTQI+ spaces because of racism or their immigration status. Many experience feelings of profound shame and/or internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia. Many have also experienced psychological, physical or sexual violence. They often have low self-esteem and low confidence, which impact on their ability to present their asylum claims. Most mainstream refugee organisations do not provide specific services to LGBTQI+ asylum seekers or information tailored to their needs. Claiming asylum on the basis of your sexual orientation or gender identity is inherently difficult. To be recognised as a refugee, you have to show that you have a well-founded fear of persecution. If your fear of persecution is based on your sexual orientation or gender identity, you also have to prove that you are lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, trans or intersex. This would be difficult for any person, but it is even harder if you have been trying to hide your sexual orientation or gender identity because your family, society or country won’t accept it and may harm you. It is also very difficult to overcome feelings of shame and internalised homophobia, biphobia or transphobia to be able to talk about your identity – particularly if any discussion of sexuality is taboo in your culture – to a figure of authority who is going to decide if you can stay in the country. Unfortunately, sometimes asylum decision-makers in the Home Office use stereotypes to try to decide if someone is LGBTQI+. Sometimes they don’t recognise the importance of cultural context. One caseworker in the Home Office once said that to try to establish someone’s sexual orientation they would “look at how they’ve explored their sexuality in a cultural context – reading Oscar Wilde perhaps, films and music”. UKLGIG is releasing a report later this month that looks at the reasons why LGBTQI+ asylum claims are rejected. People can receive it by signing up to our newsletter or following us on social media (see below). People who are seeking asylum are not allowed to work. If they need accommodation, the government will normally provide a shared room in a shared house. LGBTQI+ people in shared asylum accommodation often experience discrimination, harassment and abuse from their housemates.  People who are seeking asylum can also be held in immigration detention centres. LGBTQI+ people who are seeking asylum find themselves trapped among people who may exhibit the same prejudices and discrimination towards them as people in the country from which they are fleeing. Our joint research with Stonewall, No Safe Refuge, showed that they experience harassment and abuse as a result. Many suffer long-lasting effects on their mental health." What are you doing to celebrate Pride 2018 and can people join you? "We will be marching at Pride in London on Sat 7 July. We also have a joint event the Amnesty UK LGBTI Network and African Rainbow Family at UK Black Pride on Sunday 8 July." How can people support your work in future?  We are always looking for Volunteers and you can Donate Here. If you’d like to be involved in our governance, you can become a Member of UKLGIG. Download a form Here.   People can also: Visit our website Sign up for our newsletter  Follow us on Twitter @uklgig Like our Facebook page 
    Jul 05, 2018 2025
  • 14 Mar 2018
      This Saturday (17th March) is St. Patrick’s day. That special time of year that the world comes together to celebrate St. Patrick’s great achievement – the banishment of all snakes from Ireland. Now, let’s not let the little fact that there were never any snakes in Ireland get in the way of a good story shall we ... and, importantly get in the way of a great excuse for a stout or two! It is also, of course, the perfect excuse to celebrate the work of the numerous Irish cultural group and clubs on Localgiving – from Gaelic football teams to Irish language and literature classes. So before you go painting the town green this saturday night, think about making a small donation to one of the many local groups that strive to keep Irish culture alive in the UK for the other 364 days of the year. Here are just a few suggestions: Andersonstown Traditional & Contemporary Music School - Belfast - offers music classes, performances, qualifications & workshops in traditional & contemporary music An Droichead - Belfast - provides Irish language, arts and cultural classes and offers quality affordable childcare and afterschool activities.  Birth Mothers and their Children for Justice N.I - Campaign calling for an Inquiry into former Mother and Baby Home institutions. Raising awareness about the litany of abuses and maltreatment and illegal, non and forged consent adoptions. CAIRDE Teo - Armagh - focuses on micro-business incubation; employment, training and learning opportunities. CAIRDE Teo also promotes the use of the Irish language and works closely with other linguistic and cultural minorities in Armagh to promote multi-culturalism and diversity. Milton Keynes Irish Welfare Support Group – Milton Keynes - holds a weekly lunch club for older Irish people and their friends. The Welfare support group also has an Outreach Worker who offers advice on benefits in both English and Irish. Roger Casements GAA club - Formed in the mid 1950's to enable the Irish community in Coventry to continue enjoying the irish cultural pasttimes of Gaelic football and hurling. Here NI - Belfast - work to build the capacity of lesbian and bisexual women and their families in Northern Ireland. Human Rights Consortium - Belfast - operate to raise awareness and promote the values of human rights in Northern Ireland with a particular focus on the development of a Bill of Rights. St Joseph's GAC Glenavy -Glenavy- provides Gaelic games for all ages and abilities from as young as 4 years old.  The Emerald Centre  - Leicester - works with members of the Irish community in Leicestershire who are most in need. The centre also offers  sport and social facilities and services for  senior citizens, Pragati Asian group, disability groups and creative play. TIR CONAILL HARPS GAC - aim to strengthen communities in Glasgow through the provision of gaelic sports for young people.   
    1403 Posted by Lewis Garland
  •   This Saturday (17th March) is St. Patrick’s day. That special time of year that the world comes together to celebrate St. Patrick’s great achievement – the banishment of all snakes from Ireland. Now, let’s not let the little fact that there were never any snakes in Ireland get in the way of a good story shall we ... and, importantly get in the way of a great excuse for a stout or two! It is also, of course, the perfect excuse to celebrate the work of the numerous Irish cultural group and clubs on Localgiving – from Gaelic football teams to Irish language and literature classes. So before you go painting the town green this saturday night, think about making a small donation to one of the many local groups that strive to keep Irish culture alive in the UK for the other 364 days of the year. Here are just a few suggestions: Andersonstown Traditional & Contemporary Music School - Belfast - offers music classes, performances, qualifications & workshops in traditional & contemporary music An Droichead - Belfast - provides Irish language, arts and cultural classes and offers quality affordable childcare and afterschool activities.  Birth Mothers and their Children for Justice N.I - Campaign calling for an Inquiry into former Mother and Baby Home institutions. Raising awareness about the litany of abuses and maltreatment and illegal, non and forged consent adoptions. CAIRDE Teo - Armagh - focuses on micro-business incubation; employment, training and learning opportunities. CAIRDE Teo also promotes the use of the Irish language and works closely with other linguistic and cultural minorities in Armagh to promote multi-culturalism and diversity. Milton Keynes Irish Welfare Support Group – Milton Keynes - holds a weekly lunch club for older Irish people and their friends. The Welfare support group also has an Outreach Worker who offers advice on benefits in both English and Irish. Roger Casements GAA club - Formed in the mid 1950's to enable the Irish community in Coventry to continue enjoying the irish cultural pasttimes of Gaelic football and hurling. Here NI - Belfast - work to build the capacity of lesbian and bisexual women and their families in Northern Ireland. Human Rights Consortium - Belfast - operate to raise awareness and promote the values of human rights in Northern Ireland with a particular focus on the development of a Bill of Rights. St Joseph's GAC Glenavy -Glenavy- provides Gaelic games for all ages and abilities from as young as 4 years old.  The Emerald Centre  - Leicester - works with members of the Irish community in Leicestershire who are most in need. The centre also offers  sport and social facilities and services for  senior citizens, Pragati Asian group, disability groups and creative play. TIR CONAILL HARPS GAC - aim to strengthen communities in Glasgow through the provision of gaelic sports for young people.   
    Mar 14, 2018 1403
  • 17 Oct 2017
    Since 2000, Rewrite has been working with young people to challenge racism and fight prejudices surrounding asylum and migration. We do this by using the arts to bring together young people from different nationalities and background. Through our creative activities, we support young people to improve English language & literacy, build their confidence and develop strong social relationships with their peers.  We run three core projects in South London as well as bespoke activities; working with over 300 young people annually. At the centre of Rewrite's work is our pioneering Creative ESOL project.  Creative ESOL is a  creative language learning project working with newly arrived refugees and migrants to learn English through drama, play, dance, art and music. Our workshops are delivered by a trained ESOL teacher and an experienced drama practitioner who foster a supportive and safe environment for our participants. We believe that young people can effectively learn through play, relaxation and a creative space to express themselves engaging the body.  Once our young people feel confident, they progress onto our other creative projects We bring together young people from different nationalities and backgrounds, to build new friendships whilst learning English. Once they feel confident in language, Creative ESOL graduates can progress onto our Creative Writing group: Free Writers and/or our Youth Theatre: ReACT where they will meet other local young people from their local area. The groups offer opportunities to access cultural spaces in London, work with professional performers and take the stage at least twice a year to showcase their work to public audiences. We make a huge difference to the lives of our service users - as S's story shows S moved to London from Bangladesh in 2014 at the age of 13 knowing no English. Following a Rewrite outreach session at his school, his teachers recommended him to join the Creative ESOL project.  Three years on, S is 16 with a good command of English and is continuing to participate in the CESOL project as a Young Leader. This leadership role has given him the opportunity to give back to CESOL by “supporting the team, behaving well and helping others".  Last year, S progressed on to the React youth theatre project. He made the decision to join this programme to challenge himself further: “I can feel that I’m improving a lot and if I go to React, I can step up … because it’s been a few years now and they helped me a lot so I need to step up to show them I can do it.” “Rewrite is a great option and opportunity for people to come and learn English. Rewrite helped me a lot. I’d like to say thank you a lot for the help. Thank you.” - S The Rewrite team are so proud of S’s progress and are glad to have him as part of our team. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This month, we are raising funds for our Creative ESOL Project. To support our work and help us reach our £5000 target, take advantage of Localgiving’s Grow Your Tenner campaign and donate now to double your money. If you would like to learn more about what Rewrite does, get in touch with Farha on 07575 743103.
    2915 Posted by Farha Bi
  • Since 2000, Rewrite has been working with young people to challenge racism and fight prejudices surrounding asylum and migration. We do this by using the arts to bring together young people from different nationalities and background. Through our creative activities, we support young people to improve English language & literacy, build their confidence and develop strong social relationships with their peers.  We run three core projects in South London as well as bespoke activities; working with over 300 young people annually. At the centre of Rewrite's work is our pioneering Creative ESOL project.  Creative ESOL is a  creative language learning project working with newly arrived refugees and migrants to learn English through drama, play, dance, art and music. Our workshops are delivered by a trained ESOL teacher and an experienced drama practitioner who foster a supportive and safe environment for our participants. We believe that young people can effectively learn through play, relaxation and a creative space to express themselves engaging the body.  Once our young people feel confident, they progress onto our other creative projects We bring together young people from different nationalities and backgrounds, to build new friendships whilst learning English. Once they feel confident in language, Creative ESOL graduates can progress onto our Creative Writing group: Free Writers and/or our Youth Theatre: ReACT where they will meet other local young people from their local area. The groups offer opportunities to access cultural spaces in London, work with professional performers and take the stage at least twice a year to showcase their work to public audiences. We make a huge difference to the lives of our service users - as S's story shows S moved to London from Bangladesh in 2014 at the age of 13 knowing no English. Following a Rewrite outreach session at his school, his teachers recommended him to join the Creative ESOL project.  Three years on, S is 16 with a good command of English and is continuing to participate in the CESOL project as a Young Leader. This leadership role has given him the opportunity to give back to CESOL by “supporting the team, behaving well and helping others".  Last year, S progressed on to the React youth theatre project. He made the decision to join this programme to challenge himself further: “I can feel that I’m improving a lot and if I go to React, I can step up … because it’s been a few years now and they helped me a lot so I need to step up to show them I can do it.” “Rewrite is a great option and opportunity for people to come and learn English. Rewrite helped me a lot. I’d like to say thank you a lot for the help. Thank you.” - S The Rewrite team are so proud of S’s progress and are glad to have him as part of our team. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This month, we are raising funds for our Creative ESOL Project. To support our work and help us reach our £5000 target, take advantage of Localgiving’s Grow Your Tenner campaign and donate now to double your money. If you would like to learn more about what Rewrite does, get in touch with Farha on 07575 743103.
    Oct 17, 2017 2915
  • 18 Sep 2017
    Fundraisers are a wonderful way of inspiring supporters to get behind your cause, primarily by dedicating their own time and effort. Individuals can take something they enjoy doing - or perhaps something they don’t enjoy - and turn it into a fundraising challenge! An even easier way to generate fundraising ideas is to be aware of existing events taking place in the local area. At Localgiving we encourage all of the community groups we work with to ask their networks to consider fundraisers. And through Localgiving it is super easy for fundraisers to set up pages that send all donations directly into the cause’s bank account. People will then always support their mates doing fundraising challenges – extending a group’s network! On Localgiving every fundraiser page will attract an average of 16 donors that may not have directly supported the cause, but are more than happy to support their friend. On top of that, the average amount raised by each fundraiser is £520 - groups can’t go wrong!  In Wales, there are a significant amount of causes who are making the most of the Cardiff Half Marathon, which is coming up on October 1st. There are 6 groups who have supporters taking part and collectively they have 23 fundraisers that are focusing on 2017’s event. I wanted to share a few current fundraising stories with you:     Paul Popham Fund, Real Support Wales This group has 4 fundraisers taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon, to support their work of giving children with kidney disease a better life. They have focused on asking parents and friends of the organisation to undertake a variety of physical challenges throughout the year. Indeed they hold the title for the highest amount raised so far, out of all members of our free Wales programme. Their current donation total stands at over £7,500 and this is predominantly from fundraisers. “Localgiving has helped support our fundraising initiatives in so many ways. It is easy to use and there is a representative on hand to help with any queries - that is invaluable. We have various projects that the funds will be used for. Our Cardiff Half Marathon Team will be supporting our Christmas Appeal to send children with kidney disease and their families on a day out to see a Christmas pantomime.Localgiving is a proactive platform that encourages its members to actively raise more funds with the different campaigns. The support given by Localgiving is amazing. No other platform gives the support Localgiving does.” Joanne Popham – Volunteer, Paul Popham Fund, Renal Support Wales   Student Volunteering Cardiff: This group has 9 fundraisers taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon. The majority of the supporters are students who have taken part in their programme to encourage young people to volunteer for local causes whilst they study. “We are very proud of our team of 10 runners who will be taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon this 1st October to raise money for our student-led, independent charity Student Volunteering Cardiff (SVC). All the money will go towards supporting one of our 28 volunteering projects working with children and young people, those with disabilities, the elderly, the homeless and the local community.”  Malou Hascoet - Project Coordinator, Student Volunteering Wales   Music in Hospitals Cymru: This group has 8 fundraisers taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon. The majority of the supporters are students, musicians or hospital employees who are part of the work to bring live classical music performances into hospital wards. “We are delighted to have 11 runners in total this year. Each person has done a fantastic job with their fundraising so far, together they have helped raise a total of nearly £2000 for the charity, and we still have a few weeks to go! Many of our runners haven’t taken part in a half marathon before, so the Cardiff Half will certainly be memorable as well as challenging! Our supporters know that raising money for Music in Hospitals will make a huge difference in enabling us to carry out our work. The aim of the charity is to create joy through live music, and we do this in healthcare settings across the country. In Wales we organise around 500 concerts a year for unwell, elderly and vulnerable audiences, bringing the therapeutic benefits of live music to over 15,000 people a year. Music in Hospitals is currently working on an exciting new project with the Archbishop of Wales Fund for Children. The foundation have kindly given us a grant to spend on live music concerts for unwell or disadvantaged children in care settings across Wales. Money that our Cardiff Half runners are helping us to raise will contribute to this fund, allowing us to provide an additional 10 free concerts for the children! A big thankyou to everyone who has donated to the team, it means such a lot to us.” Hannah Beadsworth – Development Officer Wales, Music in Hospitals Cymru   Further Wales groups fundraising through the Cardiff Half Marathon: North Gwent Cardiac Rehabilitation and Aftercare Charity Pembrokeshire Citizens Advice Bureau FYD Technology Club   Example fundraiser page:    If you would like to support the work of any of the mentioned groups, please click on their links.  
    1123 Posted by Lauren Swain
  • Fundraisers are a wonderful way of inspiring supporters to get behind your cause, primarily by dedicating their own time and effort. Individuals can take something they enjoy doing - or perhaps something they don’t enjoy - and turn it into a fundraising challenge! An even easier way to generate fundraising ideas is to be aware of existing events taking place in the local area. At Localgiving we encourage all of the community groups we work with to ask their networks to consider fundraisers. And through Localgiving it is super easy for fundraisers to set up pages that send all donations directly into the cause’s bank account. People will then always support their mates doing fundraising challenges – extending a group’s network! On Localgiving every fundraiser page will attract an average of 16 donors that may not have directly supported the cause, but are more than happy to support their friend. On top of that, the average amount raised by each fundraiser is £520 - groups can’t go wrong!  In Wales, there are a significant amount of causes who are making the most of the Cardiff Half Marathon, which is coming up on October 1st. There are 6 groups who have supporters taking part and collectively they have 23 fundraisers that are focusing on 2017’s event. I wanted to share a few current fundraising stories with you:     Paul Popham Fund, Real Support Wales This group has 4 fundraisers taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon, to support their work of giving children with kidney disease a better life. They have focused on asking parents and friends of the organisation to undertake a variety of physical challenges throughout the year. Indeed they hold the title for the highest amount raised so far, out of all members of our free Wales programme. Their current donation total stands at over £7,500 and this is predominantly from fundraisers. “Localgiving has helped support our fundraising initiatives in so many ways. It is easy to use and there is a representative on hand to help with any queries - that is invaluable. We have various projects that the funds will be used for. Our Cardiff Half Marathon Team will be supporting our Christmas Appeal to send children with kidney disease and their families on a day out to see a Christmas pantomime.Localgiving is a proactive platform that encourages its members to actively raise more funds with the different campaigns. The support given by Localgiving is amazing. No other platform gives the support Localgiving does.” Joanne Popham – Volunteer, Paul Popham Fund, Renal Support Wales   Student Volunteering Cardiff: This group has 9 fundraisers taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon. The majority of the supporters are students who have taken part in their programme to encourage young people to volunteer for local causes whilst they study. “We are very proud of our team of 10 runners who will be taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon this 1st October to raise money for our student-led, independent charity Student Volunteering Cardiff (SVC). All the money will go towards supporting one of our 28 volunteering projects working with children and young people, those with disabilities, the elderly, the homeless and the local community.”  Malou Hascoet - Project Coordinator, Student Volunteering Wales   Music in Hospitals Cymru: This group has 8 fundraisers taking part in the Cardiff Half Marathon. The majority of the supporters are students, musicians or hospital employees who are part of the work to bring live classical music performances into hospital wards. “We are delighted to have 11 runners in total this year. Each person has done a fantastic job with their fundraising so far, together they have helped raise a total of nearly £2000 for the charity, and we still have a few weeks to go! Many of our runners haven’t taken part in a half marathon before, so the Cardiff Half will certainly be memorable as well as challenging! Our supporters know that raising money for Music in Hospitals will make a huge difference in enabling us to carry out our work. The aim of the charity is to create joy through live music, and we do this in healthcare settings across the country. In Wales we organise around 500 concerts a year for unwell, elderly and vulnerable audiences, bringing the therapeutic benefits of live music to over 15,000 people a year. Music in Hospitals is currently working on an exciting new project with the Archbishop of Wales Fund for Children. The foundation have kindly given us a grant to spend on live music concerts for unwell or disadvantaged children in care settings across Wales. Money that our Cardiff Half runners are helping us to raise will contribute to this fund, allowing us to provide an additional 10 free concerts for the children! A big thankyou to everyone who has donated to the team, it means such a lot to us.” Hannah Beadsworth – Development Officer Wales, Music in Hospitals Cymru   Further Wales groups fundraising through the Cardiff Half Marathon: North Gwent Cardiac Rehabilitation and Aftercare Charity Pembrokeshire Citizens Advice Bureau FYD Technology Club   Example fundraiser page:    If you would like to support the work of any of the mentioned groups, please click on their links.  
    Sep 18, 2017 1123
  • 17 Aug 2017
    Thanks to funding from The Indigo Trust and the London Leg Up Fund, Localgiving launched a programme in London in October 2016, supporting 75 groups with online fundraising. The programme aims to help the groups participating to develop digital marketing skills to raise awareness and support for their causes online. All 75 groups who are taking part also benefit from £300 of ring fenced match funding each to help kick start their online fundraising. This acts as an incentive to both the groups participating and their potential supporters as the first £300 raised per group is doubled by Localgiving. The first year of the programme is coming to an end in September and we have now recruited all 75 groups, however watch this space for future projects that we might be running in London. Several of the groups on the programme are launching campaigns this summer to use their match funding. This blog highlights some of the campaigns currently being run by groups in London, and draws on examples from other successful campaigns over the last few months. The money can be used to match any fundraising page they have on Localgiving (this could be their main fundraising page, a project page, an appeal page or a fundraising page) and allows them to tailor the match incentive to their needs. A real highlight of the programme so far has been the imaginative ways in which groups have come up with their own bespoke methods of unlocking this £300 match funding. Here’s a snapshot of what some of the groups are doing this summer in London: Taking on a Summer challenge for a local London charity Individuals taking on challenges has proved to be one of the most popular ways for groups to raise money. This light touch approach to community fundraising is ideal as it can create a new ambassador who can tell everyone about the great work the charity does and what they are fundraising for! In May, Geoff at Westbourne Park Family Centre set up a fundraising page while he was running the London Marathon and the first £300 raised was doubled by Localgiving. This challenge based style of fundraising has proven to be a popular way to unlock the match funding, and now North London Cares also have a fundraiser, Amy, who is running the Royal Parks Half Marathon on the 8th October 2017. Check out her fundraising page and help them have the first £300 they raise doubled by clicking here! Further north in Enfield, Joe Wilkinson also took part in the Prudential Ride London 46 mile Cycle on the 29th July 2017 to fundraise for the Enfield Deaf Social Club. Not all challenge fundraisers need to be physical. Over in West London Anoushka Yeoh is a self-confessed Twitter addict. Along with a group of amazing supporters at Focus West London, she pledged to go on a 24 hour ‘Digital Detox’ in aid of the charity - No TV, phone, Facebook, Spotify, nothing! Six people chose to set up fundraising pages and take part in the detox, which allowed the group to get creative with their £300 match funding, by matching the first £50 raised on each of the six fundraiser pages. This incredible campaign generated thousands for Focus West London and is a brilliant example of a D.I.Y approach to community fundraising. The thousands of pounds that were raised will help cover vital core costs of the organisation over the coming year. New Projects and Appeals in Sunny London Matching the first £300 through an appeal page has proven to be the most popular way of using the London match funding. Groups like Journey to Justice through their ‘Hyde Park Speakers Corner Marathon’ and Tower Hamlets Friends and Neighbours through their 70th-anniversary appeal have leveraged their first few supporters generosity to launch their appeals with a promise that the first £300 raised would be doubled by Localgiving. Now, Making Room, a charity who help people with hoarding behaviours, have launched an online fundraising appeal. Everything they raise will go towards the running of their help line and with a target of £10,000, they are seeking donations that will cover staff costs (£7,600), equipment and office space costs (£1,200) and promotion & advertising of this vital service (£1,200). Check out their appeal page here and help them double the first £300 they raise.  Meanwhile, over in East London Casa Lusa want to reach out to those families struggling to make sense and learning how to make sense and adapt to with autistic children in their family and in the society. Their appeal is live on Localgiving, the first £300 they raised will also be doubled, and if you would like to donate all you have to do is click here! Another imaginative way that a group is using their £300 match fund pot is through a direct debit ‘friends of’ campaign. The Mill, an independent community space run for and by the people of Walthamstow, have taken this approach. Hundreds of people of all ages and backgrounds each week visit the centre and volunteer. The Mill has now launched a ‘Friends Scheme’ in where their supporters and volunteers can set up a direct debit through Localgiving and have it matched every month until they have used their £300! If anyone is interested in hearing more about how you can get involved with our London Programme please let Conor, our London Development Manager know. Thanks again from all of us at Localgiving for the support for the programme from the funders, partners and participating groups! Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    LSE Volunteer Centre: Do you have opportunities for volunteers? Neymar your price: what is a footballer worth?  
    1253 Posted by Conor Kelly
  • Thanks to funding from The Indigo Trust and the London Leg Up Fund, Localgiving launched a programme in London in October 2016, supporting 75 groups with online fundraising. The programme aims to help the groups participating to develop digital marketing skills to raise awareness and support for their causes online. All 75 groups who are taking part also benefit from £300 of ring fenced match funding each to help kick start their online fundraising. This acts as an incentive to both the groups participating and their potential supporters as the first £300 raised per group is doubled by Localgiving. The first year of the programme is coming to an end in September and we have now recruited all 75 groups, however watch this space for future projects that we might be running in London. Several of the groups on the programme are launching campaigns this summer to use their match funding. This blog highlights some of the campaigns currently being run by groups in London, and draws on examples from other successful campaigns over the last few months. The money can be used to match any fundraising page they have on Localgiving (this could be their main fundraising page, a project page, an appeal page or a fundraising page) and allows them to tailor the match incentive to their needs. A real highlight of the programme so far has been the imaginative ways in which groups have come up with their own bespoke methods of unlocking this £300 match funding. Here’s a snapshot of what some of the groups are doing this summer in London: Taking on a Summer challenge for a local London charity Individuals taking on challenges has proved to be one of the most popular ways for groups to raise money. This light touch approach to community fundraising is ideal as it can create a new ambassador who can tell everyone about the great work the charity does and what they are fundraising for! In May, Geoff at Westbourne Park Family Centre set up a fundraising page while he was running the London Marathon and the first £300 raised was doubled by Localgiving. This challenge based style of fundraising has proven to be a popular way to unlock the match funding, and now North London Cares also have a fundraiser, Amy, who is running the Royal Parks Half Marathon on the 8th October 2017. Check out her fundraising page and help them have the first £300 they raise doubled by clicking here! Further north in Enfield, Joe Wilkinson also took part in the Prudential Ride London 46 mile Cycle on the 29th July 2017 to fundraise for the Enfield Deaf Social Club. Not all challenge fundraisers need to be physical. Over in West London Anoushka Yeoh is a self-confessed Twitter addict. Along with a group of amazing supporters at Focus West London, she pledged to go on a 24 hour ‘Digital Detox’ in aid of the charity - No TV, phone, Facebook, Spotify, nothing! Six people chose to set up fundraising pages and take part in the detox, which allowed the group to get creative with their £300 match funding, by matching the first £50 raised on each of the six fundraiser pages. This incredible campaign generated thousands for Focus West London and is a brilliant example of a D.I.Y approach to community fundraising. The thousands of pounds that were raised will help cover vital core costs of the organisation over the coming year. New Projects and Appeals in Sunny London Matching the first £300 through an appeal page has proven to be the most popular way of using the London match funding. Groups like Journey to Justice through their ‘Hyde Park Speakers Corner Marathon’ and Tower Hamlets Friends and Neighbours through their 70th-anniversary appeal have leveraged their first few supporters generosity to launch their appeals with a promise that the first £300 raised would be doubled by Localgiving. Now, Making Room, a charity who help people with hoarding behaviours, have launched an online fundraising appeal. Everything they raise will go towards the running of their help line and with a target of £10,000, they are seeking donations that will cover staff costs (£7,600), equipment and office space costs (£1,200) and promotion & advertising of this vital service (£1,200). Check out their appeal page here and help them double the first £300 they raise.  Meanwhile, over in East London Casa Lusa want to reach out to those families struggling to make sense and learning how to make sense and adapt to with autistic children in their family and in the society. Their appeal is live on Localgiving, the first £300 they raised will also be doubled, and if you would like to donate all you have to do is click here! Another imaginative way that a group is using their £300 match fund pot is through a direct debit ‘friends of’ campaign. The Mill, an independent community space run for and by the people of Walthamstow, have taken this approach. Hundreds of people of all ages and backgrounds each week visit the centre and volunteer. The Mill has now launched a ‘Friends Scheme’ in where their supporters and volunteers can set up a direct debit through Localgiving and have it matched every month until they have used their £300! If anyone is interested in hearing more about how you can get involved with our London Programme please let Conor, our London Development Manager know. Thanks again from all of us at Localgiving for the support for the programme from the funders, partners and participating groups! Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    LSE Volunteer Centre: Do you have opportunities for volunteers? Neymar your price: what is a footballer worth?  
    Aug 17, 2017 1253
  • 03 Aug 2017
    Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    1803 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Neymar Jr, the precocious poster boy of Brazilian football, is winging his way to Paris from Catalonia for a world record breaking £198 million. It is reported that he will be paid an annual salary of £40 million to sport the famous blue and red of Paris Saint-Germain. Neymar’s footballing ability is indisputable and, of course, the crazy world of football transfer fees did not start here.   But when figures of this size are bandied about, the question inevitably arises, what else could be achieved with such a gargantuan sum? The immediate comparison many people make is with the cost of healthcare. So to clear this up early, Neymar is worth two specialist Emergency Care Hospitals. However, at Localgiving, our natural point of comparison tends to be a little different. The impact that local charities and community groups can make with a few pounds and some passionate volunteers is incredible. This being the case, we thought it’d be interesting to see just how far £198 million could go if put in the hands of our members. So, here we go... for the price of 1 Neymar.... Norwich Foodbank could feed the entire population of Norwich (213,166 people) for 1 month  (£32 million). Hackney City Farm could feed 100 sheep, 100 chickens and 100 pigs for 100 years  (£12 million). The Harbour Project could run their drop-in centre for refugees and asylum seekers for 55 straight years (£10 million). Thames Valley Kings Wheelchair Basketball Club could buy 3000 specialist sports wheelchairs (£12 million). Every child in the UK could receive both a USB stick from WeeeCharity and a free book from CraigMillar Literacy Trust (£77 million) Calderdale Smartmove could provide 1 emergency food pack, 1 camp bed and 2 pillows to every rough sleeper in England (£200K) Oakhaven Hospice could offer 400 patients 160 hours of nursing care in their own homes each (£4 million) Dahlia Project could offer a 12 week group session to every women or girl affected by FGM in the whole of England and Wales (£25 million). Fitzrovia Youth in Action could provide 5,000 young people with football coaching for 5 years; St.Matthews Project could then equip them all with new football boots each year (£5.5 million). First Days Children's Charity could buy 100,000 mattresses for toddlers (£5 million).            Citizens Advice Bath and North East Somerset could offer personalised casework support to every resident of Bath (£8.3 million). Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation could offer 200 women fleeing violence 20 hours of councelling each (£80K). Annapurna Indian Dance Company could put on 2 dance workshops in every school in the whole of the UK (£5 million) And finally, bringing us up to a grand total of £198 million, Talking Money would be able to provide 20,000 one-to-one debt advice sessions for £2 million. I am sure that Neymar will go on to have an illustrious career in Paris, garnished by winner’s medals and Ballon d'Ors. However, if for some reason things do go awry, we strongly suggest Paris Saint-Germain keep a note of Talking Money's advice line and maybe book up a few of those one-to-one sessions early. You know, Just in case...   
    Aug 03, 2017 1803
  • 20 Jul 2017
    I’m Beth House and I’m the Creative Producer at Taking Flight Theatre Company. We are a small charity aiming to challenge perceptions of disability through making quality touring theatre that showcases talented, professional disabled, D/deaf, sensory impaired and non-disabled performers working together. Taking Flight Theatre does not get core funding. There is some business development support from The Arts Council of Wales, plus project funding from them too. In addition to this, we get lots of small grants from a wide variety of sources… and then we fundraise like crazy. It's really hard to fundraise to cover our planning time. We have loads of brilliant projects coming up next year. These include an England tour of You’ve Got Dragons, our show for young children based on the picture book by Kathryn Cave which gently raises the issue of mental health in very young people, and of course our annual accessible Shakespeare tour of Wales. But we need time to plan and manage all these projects starting now. Lots of people give to Taking Flight- money, time, support, smiles- I wanted to give something too. So I decided to do something drastic. I love my hair so I thought- why not shave it off? But not all of it (let’s face it- that’s been done) so just half of it. And dye the rest. Whatever colour the sponsors want me to dye it. I made a fundraising page to this end on my own personal Locagiving account: SHAVEBETH’SHAIR . However, when I started to publicise the campaign, I got lots of cross messages from friends and family who point blank refused to fund me shaving off the locks THEY had grown so attached to (Huh!). So, I set up a second page: SAVEBETH’SHAIR. I have set my two fundraising pages in competition with each other. The page that has the greatest total at 10am on July 30th wins and I will save or shave my hair accordingly. If it’s SHAVE, I will also dye my remaining hair the colour voted for by the most SHAVE supporters. The combined total must be at least £1k for me to shave. To shave or not to shave! I’m really hoping to raise at least £1000 towards the work of Taking Flight. All the money raised will go into the making Taking Flight function over the busy months of planning next year’s shows.  If you want to see the work of Taking Flight before you decide if you want to support them, they are currently on tour with their take on The Tempest until July 30th. Remaining dates are in West Wales, South Wales and The Forest of Dean  www.takingflighttheatre.co.uk for details. Taking Flight are currently also recruiting volunteers and board members.   Show images: Jorge Lizalde Cano headshot: Claire Cousin Found this blog post useful? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story?  
    840 Posted by Beth House
  • I’m Beth House and I’m the Creative Producer at Taking Flight Theatre Company. We are a small charity aiming to challenge perceptions of disability through making quality touring theatre that showcases talented, professional disabled, D/deaf, sensory impaired and non-disabled performers working together. Taking Flight Theatre does not get core funding. There is some business development support from The Arts Council of Wales, plus project funding from them too. In addition to this, we get lots of small grants from a wide variety of sources… and then we fundraise like crazy. It's really hard to fundraise to cover our planning time. We have loads of brilliant projects coming up next year. These include an England tour of You’ve Got Dragons, our show for young children based on the picture book by Kathryn Cave which gently raises the issue of mental health in very young people, and of course our annual accessible Shakespeare tour of Wales. But we need time to plan and manage all these projects starting now. Lots of people give to Taking Flight- money, time, support, smiles- I wanted to give something too. So I decided to do something drastic. I love my hair so I thought- why not shave it off? But not all of it (let’s face it- that’s been done) so just half of it. And dye the rest. Whatever colour the sponsors want me to dye it. I made a fundraising page to this end on my own personal Locagiving account: SHAVEBETH’SHAIR . However, when I started to publicise the campaign, I got lots of cross messages from friends and family who point blank refused to fund me shaving off the locks THEY had grown so attached to (Huh!). So, I set up a second page: SAVEBETH’SHAIR. I have set my two fundraising pages in competition with each other. The page that has the greatest total at 10am on July 30th wins and I will save or shave my hair accordingly. If it’s SHAVE, I will also dye my remaining hair the colour voted for by the most SHAVE supporters. The combined total must be at least £1k for me to shave. To shave or not to shave! I’m really hoping to raise at least £1000 towards the work of Taking Flight. All the money raised will go into the making Taking Flight function over the busy months of planning next year’s shows.  If you want to see the work of Taking Flight before you decide if you want to support them, they are currently on tour with their take on The Tempest until July 30th. Remaining dates are in West Wales, South Wales and The Forest of Dean  www.takingflighttheatre.co.uk for details. Taking Flight are currently also recruiting volunteers and board members.   Show images: Jorge Lizalde Cano headshot: Claire Cousin Found this blog post useful? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story?  
    Jul 20, 2017 840
  • 13 Jul 2017
    Less than three years ago the Wild Cat Wilderness in Catford was an overgrown, unloved, rubbish strewn site. Today it is a thriving community green space run by the Rushey Green Time Bank. The Wild Cat Wilderness is a unique space in the local area, a safe (but wild) oasis which allows the local community to enjoy and work with nature, harvest and grow fresh local food, a piece of the countryside in the heart of Catford which backs onto the Pool River. It's a space the community have shaped, a place for children to safely run around, get dirty and learn, a meeting point for families, for neighbours, to make friends and feel part of a community. It is used by many local schools for outdoor learning and a place where the wider community can volunteer, relax in its peacefulness, share and enjoy with other local people of all ages, cultures, faiths and abilities. Unfortunately the tranquility has been recently disrupted and the Wilderness has been the victim of some terrible vandalism over the period of a week. It has been broken into four times and on two occasions the vandals maliciously attacked the hives and tried to drown the honeybees. This mindless destruction of our wonderful pollinators has been deeply upsetting. One colony has been destroyed and hives broken, and the bees that survived have now been removed off site until security is improved. The vandals have also destroyed the pond several times, broken into the shed, slashed the outdoor classroom and water butts, destroyed a hand built fence and the bug hotels - in fact everything that the community created. Whilst volunteers are gradually rebuilding, the bee appeal has been set up on Localgiving to replace a hive, build an apiary cage and increase the security. So that this negative can be turned into a positive the appeal will also help set up Project Buzz, a pilot project to engage local young people in beekeeping and making bee related products.  The bees will return once the security has been improved and an apiary cage built so that the community can continue to learn about our ever so important buzzing friends. If you want to help out then apart from making a donation come and volunteer – no experience necessary and we always need someone to make tea! Check the What’s On page on the website www.wildcatwilderness.org for dates, sign up for the newsletter, plus book a place on one of wonderful free activities and events planned over the summer. Enjoyed this blog? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! When Being Angry Is Not Enough by Leyla Hussein   
    1108 Posted by Maria Devereaux
  • Less than three years ago the Wild Cat Wilderness in Catford was an overgrown, unloved, rubbish strewn site. Today it is a thriving community green space run by the Rushey Green Time Bank. The Wild Cat Wilderness is a unique space in the local area, a safe (but wild) oasis which allows the local community to enjoy and work with nature, harvest and grow fresh local food, a piece of the countryside in the heart of Catford which backs onto the Pool River. It's a space the community have shaped, a place for children to safely run around, get dirty and learn, a meeting point for families, for neighbours, to make friends and feel part of a community. It is used by many local schools for outdoor learning and a place where the wider community can volunteer, relax in its peacefulness, share and enjoy with other local people of all ages, cultures, faiths and abilities. Unfortunately the tranquility has been recently disrupted and the Wilderness has been the victim of some terrible vandalism over the period of a week. It has been broken into four times and on two occasions the vandals maliciously attacked the hives and tried to drown the honeybees. This mindless destruction of our wonderful pollinators has been deeply upsetting. One colony has been destroyed and hives broken, and the bees that survived have now been removed off site until security is improved. The vandals have also destroyed the pond several times, broken into the shed, slashed the outdoor classroom and water butts, destroyed a hand built fence and the bug hotels - in fact everything that the community created. Whilst volunteers are gradually rebuilding, the bee appeal has been set up on Localgiving to replace a hive, build an apiary cage and increase the security. So that this negative can be turned into a positive the appeal will also help set up Project Buzz, a pilot project to engage local young people in beekeeping and making bee related products.  The bees will return once the security has been improved and an apiary cage built so that the community can continue to learn about our ever so important buzzing friends. If you want to help out then apart from making a donation come and volunteer – no experience necessary and we always need someone to make tea! Check the What’s On page on the website www.wildcatwilderness.org for dates, sign up for the newsletter, plus book a place on one of wonderful free activities and events planned over the summer. Enjoyed this blog? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! When Being Angry Is Not Enough by Leyla Hussein   
    Jul 13, 2017 1108