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  • 13 Jul 2017
    Less than three years ago the Wild Cat Wilderness in Catford was an overgrown, unloved, rubbish strewn site. Today it is a thriving community green space run by the Rushey Green Time Bank. The Wild Cat Wilderness is a unique space in the local area, a safe (but wild) oasis which allows the local community to enjoy and work with nature, harvest and grow fresh local food, a piece of the countryside in the heart of Catford which backs onto the Pool River. It's a space the community have shaped, a place for children to safely run around, get dirty and learn, a meeting point for families, for neighbours, to make friends and feel part of a community. It is used by many local schools for outdoor learning and a place where the wider community can volunteer, relax in its peacefulness, share and enjoy with other local people of all ages, cultures, faiths and abilities. Unfortunately the tranquility has been recently disrupted and the Wilderness has been the victim of some terrible vandalism over the period of a week. It has been broken into four times and on two occasions the vandals maliciously attacked the hives and tried to drown the honeybees. This mindless destruction of our wonderful pollinators has been deeply upsetting. One colony has been destroyed and hives broken, and the bees that survived have now been removed off site until security is improved. The vandals have also destroyed the pond several times, broken into the shed, slashed the outdoor classroom and water butts, destroyed a hand built fence and the bug hotels - in fact everything that the community created. Whilst volunteers are gradually rebuilding, the bee appeal has been set up on Localgiving to replace a hive, build an apiary cage and increase the security. So that this negative can be turned into a positive the appeal will also help set up Project Buzz, a pilot project to engage local young people in beekeeping and making bee related products.  The bees will return once the security has been improved and an apiary cage built so that the community can continue to learn about our ever so important buzzing friends. If you want to help out then apart from making a donation come and volunteer – no experience necessary and we always need someone to make tea! Check the What’s On page on the website www.wildcatwilderness.org for dates, sign up for the newsletter, plus book a place on one of wonderful free activities and events planned over the summer. Enjoyed this blog? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! When Being Angry Is Not Enough by Leyla Hussein   
    1195 Posted by Maria Devereaux
  • Less than three years ago the Wild Cat Wilderness in Catford was an overgrown, unloved, rubbish strewn site. Today it is a thriving community green space run by the Rushey Green Time Bank. The Wild Cat Wilderness is a unique space in the local area, a safe (but wild) oasis which allows the local community to enjoy and work with nature, harvest and grow fresh local food, a piece of the countryside in the heart of Catford which backs onto the Pool River. It's a space the community have shaped, a place for children to safely run around, get dirty and learn, a meeting point for families, for neighbours, to make friends and feel part of a community. It is used by many local schools for outdoor learning and a place where the wider community can volunteer, relax in its peacefulness, share and enjoy with other local people of all ages, cultures, faiths and abilities. Unfortunately the tranquility has been recently disrupted and the Wilderness has been the victim of some terrible vandalism over the period of a week. It has been broken into four times and on two occasions the vandals maliciously attacked the hives and tried to drown the honeybees. This mindless destruction of our wonderful pollinators has been deeply upsetting. One colony has been destroyed and hives broken, and the bees that survived have now been removed off site until security is improved. The vandals have also destroyed the pond several times, broken into the shed, slashed the outdoor classroom and water butts, destroyed a hand built fence and the bug hotels - in fact everything that the community created. Whilst volunteers are gradually rebuilding, the bee appeal has been set up on Localgiving to replace a hive, build an apiary cage and increase the security. So that this negative can be turned into a positive the appeal will also help set up Project Buzz, a pilot project to engage local young people in beekeeping and making bee related products.  The bees will return once the security has been improved and an apiary cage built so that the community can continue to learn about our ever so important buzzing friends. If you want to help out then apart from making a donation come and volunteer – no experience necessary and we always need someone to make tea! Check the What’s On page on the website www.wildcatwilderness.org for dates, sign up for the newsletter, plus book a place on one of wonderful free activities and events planned over the summer. Enjoyed this blog? You may also like:     Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support! When Being Angry Is Not Enough by Leyla Hussein   
    Jul 13, 2017 1195
  • 10 Jul 2017
    Leyla Hussein is an anti-FGM activist, psychotherapist, and founder of the Dahlia Project.  I underwent female genital mutilation (FGM) when I was seven years old. I was held down by women I trusted and it left deep scars physically and emotionally. However, it was not until many years later, when I gave birth to my daughter, that anyone talked to me about FGM and offered me help. This practice is shrouded in secrecy and shame with too many women suffering in silence through many years of pain. I was one of these women until a brave health professional asked that all important question, “Have you been cut?”.  That was the start of a long and often difficult journey which will last for the rest of my life. I had to face up to what had been done to me and how it had affected me. FGM cast a shadow over all my life choices and it was only after I began therapy that I could understand this. FGM cannot be undone but survivors can heal. We had to be strong to survive what was done to us and I see that strength every day in the women I now work with. I founded the Dahlia Project to help other women like me. As I came to terms with my experience of FGM I was horrified at how little recognition there was of how this devastating practice affects women psychologically. There were no specialists we could turn to and most of our GPs or other sources of help had little knowledge of FGM. At Dahlia Project we break the silence and provide a safe space and therapeutic support for women living with FGM. These are often women who have no access to other help. They are vulnerable, come from minority communities, are under-represented at all levels of government and policy making and yet they suffer such pain and are in urgent need of our help. They are also the most important asset we have in ending FGM but still they are ignored and not seen as a priority. This is not about austerity or any other easy political soundbite. Political parties in the UK all signed up to stand against FGM decades ago and progress has been made clarifying the law and raising awareness. However, none of them have properly invested in the community based work which is where we will change opinion and end the practice. There are many examples of good practice but these fall by the wayside due to lack of funding and time after time we must start over building relationships and trust. I write this blog as Dahlia Project is under threat. This project is close to my heart and I am so proud of what it has achieved. Working with the incredible women I meet at the project, who have gone through so much, and seeing them heal and support each other, is inspiring. Their determination that FGM ends with them and that their daughters will not be cut fills me with hope for a better future. Working with women who have been cut and supporting them so they can protect their daughters is how we stop FGM. My daughter lives free from FGM because I was helped and I can now protect and empower her. Over the last 3 years the Dahila Project has helped many women but it is the tip of an iceberg as an estimated 137,000 women and girls in England and Wales have undergone FGM and 60,000 girls are at risk. Awareness of FGM amongst the public has risen in recent years but the situation remains bleak for FGM survivors. Earlier this year, the Acton FGM Clinic which was one of the few community based clinics in London for FGM survivors was forced to close due to a lack of funding. Now Dahlia Project is also under threat. Unless we find new sources of income Dahlia Project will no longer be able to provide its unique and life changing services. Politicians from all political parties talk about how they are committed to tackling FGM but to many of us working directly with the women and girls it effects their words offer little hope while the specialist clinics are closing. Only last week at Prime Minister’s Questions Theresa May once again made a strong statement against FGM. While she was speaking we were working to launch the new appeal for emergency funding for the Dahlia Project. Rather than warm words and a pat on the back for being brave what FGM survivors really need is long term investment in the services which help them. Please share this blog and our appeal to help save this valuable service. We must also pressure for a long-term commitment to provide support for FGM survivors. Write to your MP and local councils asking what they are doing to ensure funded, specialist, community based services for FGM survivors. Sometimes being angry or upset about injustice is not enough and we need to focus that anger into positive action which will bring about change.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support!  
    3195 Posted by Leyla Hussein
  • Leyla Hussein is an anti-FGM activist, psychotherapist, and founder of the Dahlia Project.  I underwent female genital mutilation (FGM) when I was seven years old. I was held down by women I trusted and it left deep scars physically and emotionally. However, it was not until many years later, when I gave birth to my daughter, that anyone talked to me about FGM and offered me help. This practice is shrouded in secrecy and shame with too many women suffering in silence through many years of pain. I was one of these women until a brave health professional asked that all important question, “Have you been cut?”.  That was the start of a long and often difficult journey which will last for the rest of my life. I had to face up to what had been done to me and how it had affected me. FGM cast a shadow over all my life choices and it was only after I began therapy that I could understand this. FGM cannot be undone but survivors can heal. We had to be strong to survive what was done to us and I see that strength every day in the women I now work with. I founded the Dahlia Project to help other women like me. As I came to terms with my experience of FGM I was horrified at how little recognition there was of how this devastating practice affects women psychologically. There were no specialists we could turn to and most of our GPs or other sources of help had little knowledge of FGM. At Dahlia Project we break the silence and provide a safe space and therapeutic support for women living with FGM. These are often women who have no access to other help. They are vulnerable, come from minority communities, are under-represented at all levels of government and policy making and yet they suffer such pain and are in urgent need of our help. They are also the most important asset we have in ending FGM but still they are ignored and not seen as a priority. This is not about austerity or any other easy political soundbite. Political parties in the UK all signed up to stand against FGM decades ago and progress has been made clarifying the law and raising awareness. However, none of them have properly invested in the community based work which is where we will change opinion and end the practice. There are many examples of good practice but these fall by the wayside due to lack of funding and time after time we must start over building relationships and trust. I write this blog as Dahlia Project is under threat. This project is close to my heart and I am so proud of what it has achieved. Working with the incredible women I meet at the project, who have gone through so much, and seeing them heal and support each other, is inspiring. Their determination that FGM ends with them and that their daughters will not be cut fills me with hope for a better future. Working with women who have been cut and supporting them so they can protect their daughters is how we stop FGM. My daughter lives free from FGM because I was helped and I can now protect and empower her. Over the last 3 years the Dahila Project has helped many women but it is the tip of an iceberg as an estimated 137,000 women and girls in England and Wales have undergone FGM and 60,000 girls are at risk. Awareness of FGM amongst the public has risen in recent years but the situation remains bleak for FGM survivors. Earlier this year, the Acton FGM Clinic which was one of the few community based clinics in London for FGM survivors was forced to close due to a lack of funding. Now Dahlia Project is also under threat. Unless we find new sources of income Dahlia Project will no longer be able to provide its unique and life changing services. Politicians from all political parties talk about how they are committed to tackling FGM but to many of us working directly with the women and girls it effects their words offer little hope while the specialist clinics are closing. Only last week at Prime Minister’s Questions Theresa May once again made a strong statement against FGM. While she was speaking we were working to launch the new appeal for emergency funding for the Dahlia Project. Rather than warm words and a pat on the back for being brave what FGM survivors really need is long term investment in the services which help them. Please share this blog and our appeal to help save this valuable service. We must also pressure for a long-term commitment to provide support for FGM survivors. Write to your MP and local councils asking what they are doing to ensure funded, specialist, community based services for FGM survivors. Sometimes being angry or upset about injustice is not enough and we need to focus that anger into positive action which will bring about change.   Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Charity and Community Group Sustainability Report 2016 Pride and Prejudice: Local LGBTQI groups need your support!  
    Jul 10, 2017 3195
  • 06 Jul 2017
    This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    1870 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • This weekend London's streets will once again be awash with rainbow flags, facepaint, floats and festivities - it’s Pride 2017! Amid these colourful annual celebrations, it is easy to forget the long history of oppression, and the significant barriers still facing LGBTQI people both in UK and across the world. Localgiving’s ambassador Rod Thomas, AKA Bright Light Bright Light is a strong advocate for the LGBTQI community . As recently as February this year, Rod could be found raising funds and awareness for Pride Cymru through his 5k per day challenge. In the run up to London Pride 2017, Rod told us just how important it is to continue to support LGBTQI charities and community groups: “The widespread opinion is that LGBTQI people are safe these days, but homophobia and prejudice is still ingrained in so many pockets of society across the world - even evident in deals our own Government are making, and the actions of other Western countries who are supposed to be leading the free world. Prides are an important event to remind LGBTQI people everywhere that they are not alone, that they have support, and that they have rights. Supporting LGBTQI groups is so important, especially in times where there is a presumed safety but still very real danger for people, as their work truly saves and enriches so many lives”. So whether you’re parading in the capital this weekend, or planning on getting involved with any of the other Pride events taking place across the UK this summer – think about lending some support to the local community groups who work everyday to provide support to the LGBTQI community.  The Proud Trust- supports LGBT young people and LGBT Youth organisations in the North of England. Gendered Intelligence - work predominantly with the trans community in London with a focus on supporting young trans people aged 8-25. The Kite Project - Promote the health, well-being, and inclusion of LGBT+ young people across Cambridgeshire.  Space Youth Project -Providing support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning young people throughout Dorset. HERE NI - Works across Northern Ireland with lesbian and bisexual women. Q- Alliance - Provides information, support, assistance and fun for LGBT people in Milton Keynes. GEMS - GEMS delivers inclusive activities for primarily older gay men in Brighton. Viva LGBT+  Runs weekly groups in Wrexham, Rhyl & Llandudno Junction, where LGBT+ young people can access support, social opportunities & activities that raise awareness of LGBT+ history & culture. Icebreakers An LGBT self-help, mutual support group for gay and bisexual men in Manchester. Norwich Pride - A celebration from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans community for everyone in Norwich.  Coventry Pride - Serves Coventry's LGBT+ community by running Coventry pride, celebrating LGBT History Month, Coming Out Day and running events to create a safe space for the LGBT+ community in Coventry. Pride Cymru -  Works to eliminate discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender within Wales. Warwickshire Pride - Works to ensure that all people feel valued and included in society, regardless of sexuality or gender identity. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Shining a Bright Light on local charities Rod's Top Tips on Running for Fun and Funds   
    Jul 06, 2017 1870
  • 12 Apr 2017
    At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    1247 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • At the start of Week 2 early leader, Martin Green was usurped after an extraordinary overtaking manoeuvre from Francesca Ferrari and Rachel  who ran the Brighton Marathon for Friends of Hillside School on Sunday. However, Team Hillside will have to really keep an eye on their mirrors to avoid losing top-spot to the fast encroaching Lucy Hayre who is running the Sheffield Half Marathon for survivors of depression in transition After 11 days of Local Hero 2017, the campaign has 205 fundraisers taking part representing 135 group. As things stand a fundraiser needs  just 18 unique donors to make it onto the leaderboard. So why not join in the fun today?   As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! 7runners:  1 cause – 7 people  are running the Hackney Half Marathon to raise money for our Gendered Intelligence’s annual trans youth camping trip. Watch their promotional video here.  Daring to be Dairy Free - Meghan Gilleece is going Vegan for April in support of North Belfast based community garden charity Grow. Hair today, gone tomorrow – 12 year old Evi Hudson is chopping off her lovely locks in support of cancer charity Yeleni Therapy & Support. Weight loss and weightlessness  - Joseph Cornford-Hutchings is completing a tandem skydive  for Snowflake Night Shelter in Hastings and St. Leonards. Lets get Regina O'Reilly snowed under by Funders! Regina is running the gruelling North Pole Marathon for the Heart of Experian Charity Fund. If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!    
    Apr 12, 2017 1247
  • 06 Apr 2017
    Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager the Archway Project, explains how they use digital tools to support their fundraising activities. What is the Archway Project? The Archway Project will transform the learning facilities at the Roman Baths. It consists of three elements: A new learning centre that includes a pioneering Investigation Zone set among in-situ Roman remains A new World Heritage Centre for Bath that will enthuse everyone to explore our special city An extension to the Roman Baths - currently, a sauna (called a laconicum) is hidden behind two non-descript wooden doors. These doors will disappear, and visitors to the Baths will be able to enjoy it. These will open in 2019.   Why is the Archway Project important? The learning facilities at the Roman Baths are over-subscribed and inadequate for the needs of 21st century learners. There is also nowhere for people to learn about why Bath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Finally, some of the Roman archaeology and collections are under threat if they are not cared for. The Archway Project will address all these needs simultaneously. What is the sponsor a tile appeal? Donors can leave their own individual mark and message of support on a virtual tile. The marks are inspired by our collection of Roman ceramic building materials – box tiles and bricks. The box tiles were used to construct the Great Bath’s roof. Builders marked the surface of the actual tiles with wooden combs, to help the mortar stick. One of the bricks in our collection, similar to those that feature in the laconicum floor, features a dog’s paw print. Who is leading the appeal? The Roman Baths Foundation is an independent charity, whose purpose is to support learning and conservation at the Roman Baths through fundraising and advocacy. Fundraising for the Archway Project is its first task. Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, is leading the fundraising drive for the Archway Project. Rebecca says: “Sponsor a tile is the first time the Foundation has used a digital platform to raise funds. Local Giving and platform developers Considered Creative worked closely together to help us create it. We wanted something dynamic that would appeal to local residents. With Local Giving’s and Considered Creative’s support, we have achieved that. Now we are working on promoting it.” How do I sponsor a tile? Sponsoring a tile is easy and low-cost. You can sponsor a tile here from £5. How do I find out more about the Archway Project? There is lots of information about the project on the Roman Baths website or you can contact Rebecca directly at archway@bathnes.gov.uk Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero 2017: Let the Race Begin  How to be a better donor in one easy step Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society Image:  Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, standing next to the Laconicum, which will be open to the public in 2019.
    908 Posted by Rebecca Gibson
  • Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager the Archway Project, explains how they use digital tools to support their fundraising activities. What is the Archway Project? The Archway Project will transform the learning facilities at the Roman Baths. It consists of three elements: A new learning centre that includes a pioneering Investigation Zone set among in-situ Roman remains A new World Heritage Centre for Bath that will enthuse everyone to explore our special city An extension to the Roman Baths - currently, a sauna (called a laconicum) is hidden behind two non-descript wooden doors. These doors will disappear, and visitors to the Baths will be able to enjoy it. These will open in 2019.   Why is the Archway Project important? The learning facilities at the Roman Baths are over-subscribed and inadequate for the needs of 21st century learners. There is also nowhere for people to learn about why Bath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Finally, some of the Roman archaeology and collections are under threat if they are not cared for. The Archway Project will address all these needs simultaneously. What is the sponsor a tile appeal? Donors can leave their own individual mark and message of support on a virtual tile. The marks are inspired by our collection of Roman ceramic building materials – box tiles and bricks. The box tiles were used to construct the Great Bath’s roof. Builders marked the surface of the actual tiles with wooden combs, to help the mortar stick. One of the bricks in our collection, similar to those that feature in the laconicum floor, features a dog’s paw print. Who is leading the appeal? The Roman Baths Foundation is an independent charity, whose purpose is to support learning and conservation at the Roman Baths through fundraising and advocacy. Fundraising for the Archway Project is its first task. Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, is leading the fundraising drive for the Archway Project. Rebecca says: “Sponsor a tile is the first time the Foundation has used a digital platform to raise funds. Local Giving and platform developers Considered Creative worked closely together to help us create it. We wanted something dynamic that would appeal to local residents. With Local Giving’s and Considered Creative’s support, we have achieved that. Now we are working on promoting it.” How do I sponsor a tile? Sponsoring a tile is easy and low-cost. You can sponsor a tile here from £5. How do I find out more about the Archway Project? There is lots of information about the project on the Roman Baths website or you can contact Rebecca directly at archway@bathnes.gov.uk Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero 2017: Let the Race Begin  How to be a better donor in one easy step Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society Image:  Rebecca Gibson, Development Manager, standing next to the Laconicum, which will be open to the public in 2019.
    Apr 06, 2017 908
  • 03 Apr 2017
    We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    1791 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • We’re just days into Local Hero 2017 but the race is already heating up.  Taking an early lead with 39 points is Martin Green who recently ran the Manchester marathon dressed as a Phoenix Nights Style Michael Jackson. Martin is fundraising for the The Riff Raff Society - a Manchester based organisation that provides funding and community support for mancunians in need. Infact, fundraisers for The Riff Raff society are currently filling all three Local Hero podium positions! We're thrilled to see Martin's off the wall antics doing so well - but remember there is still plenty of time to beat it. If you wanna be starting something why not sign up as a fundraiser now! You'll automatically be included in Local Hero 2017. As well as updating you on our leaders, each week during the campaign we’ll highlight some of the fundraiser pages that have caught our attention. Below are this week's heroes! An easter without chocolate! Daily chocolate devourer, Paul Belsey, is giving up chocolate for the whole month of April in support of Muffin's Dream Foundation. To bee or net tu-be? - Fundraising is all about creating a buzz. These Tennis2Be fundraisers will be hovering around London's tube stations to show that tennis can be played anywhere, anytime! I would walk 500 Miles and I would walk 500 more Nicky Handcock is walking 1000 miles including the whole London Loop for Richmond and Kingston ME Group. These girls have fire in their bellies! A This Girl Can team are competing in the Bradford Lord Mayor's Appeal Dragon Boat Festival for Young Minds. Woah - thats a beard and a half! Four years after having a stroke, Alex has transformed himself into a regular half marathon runner. Alex is now running the Yorkshire double in support of Leeds and District ABC support group - and this time he'll be dragging a little extra weight from his chin.  If you’ve got stirring story or a creative challenge why not get in touch! Until next week, happy fundraising!  
    Apr 03, 2017 1791
  • 06 Feb 2017
    6th – 12th February is Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week 2017 The prevalence of sexual abuse and violence is truly shocking, both at the global and national level: The World Health Organisation estimates that 1 in 3 women will be raped in their lifetime, worldwide. In the UK, 20% of  women aged between 16 and 59 have experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16 85,000 women are raped every year in England and Wales Sadly there is still a huge amount of ignorance and denial around this area – what is particularly worrying is the continued, widespread culture of victims blaming. This awareness week aims to empower those affected by sexual abuse and violence and to send out a  clear message that there is absolutely no situation in which sexual abuse or violence are acceptable in any form. At Localgiving we are proud to work alongside numerous charities and community groups that focus on these issues on a  daily basis – supporting victims of sexual violence and raising awareness of these issues. To recognise Sexual abuse and Sexual violence awareness week (6th -12th Feb 2017) we recommend: A) Joining the conversation on social media using the hashtag #ItsNotOK B) Finding out about a charity in your area and supporting their cause through donating, volunteering or advocating: Search here for a charity near you. To help you we have compiled a list of some of the Localgiving groups working in this area: SARSAS -Somerset and Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support (Somerset) RSVP -Rape and Sexual Violence Project (Birmingham) (RACS)Rotherham Abuse Counselling Service (Rotherham) VOICES - Domestic Abuse Charity (Bath) Behind Closed Doors (Leeds) Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group (Peterborough) SHE UK (Mansfield) The Dash Charity (Slough) Safe and Sound (Derby) Breaking Free female Support Project (Swindon) Survivors' Network (Brighton) Male Survivors Berkshire CIC (Berkshire)      
    2658 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • 6th – 12th February is Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week 2017 The prevalence of sexual abuse and violence is truly shocking, both at the global and national level: The World Health Organisation estimates that 1 in 3 women will be raped in their lifetime, worldwide. In the UK, 20% of  women aged between 16 and 59 have experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16 85,000 women are raped every year in England and Wales Sadly there is still a huge amount of ignorance and denial around this area – what is particularly worrying is the continued, widespread culture of victims blaming. This awareness week aims to empower those affected by sexual abuse and violence and to send out a  clear message that there is absolutely no situation in which sexual abuse or violence are acceptable in any form. At Localgiving we are proud to work alongside numerous charities and community groups that focus on these issues on a  daily basis – supporting victims of sexual violence and raising awareness of these issues. To recognise Sexual abuse and Sexual violence awareness week (6th -12th Feb 2017) we recommend: A) Joining the conversation on social media using the hashtag #ItsNotOK B) Finding out about a charity in your area and supporting their cause through donating, volunteering or advocating: Search here for a charity near you. To help you we have compiled a list of some of the Localgiving groups working in this area: SARSAS -Somerset and Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support (Somerset) RSVP -Rape and Sexual Violence Project (Birmingham) (RACS)Rotherham Abuse Counselling Service (Rotherham) VOICES - Domestic Abuse Charity (Bath) Behind Closed Doors (Leeds) Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group (Peterborough) SHE UK (Mansfield) The Dash Charity (Slough) Safe and Sound (Derby) Breaking Free female Support Project (Swindon) Survivors' Network (Brighton) Male Survivors Berkshire CIC (Berkshire)      
    Feb 06, 2017 2658
  • 29 Sep 2016
    Huge congratulations go to Community Foundation for Calderdale for winning both best fundraising campaign at the Third Sector Awards 2016 and Fundraising Team of the Year: with an income under £5 million at the Charity Times Awards 2016.  On Boxing Day 2015 Storm Eva caused the River Calder to burst it's banks – the subsequent flooding had a devestating impact on businesses and homes across Calderdale. CFFC Immediately responded by launching its Calderdale Flood Fund to help rebuild the community.  Working closely with both local and national media, corporates and voluntary goups, CFFC raised over £2.5 million to support the community in its recovery - £250,000 of which came through its Localgiving appeal page. It was truly inspiring to witness the creativity and hard-work put into this campaign, and to have had the opportunity to play a role in its success.  In March we spoke to Emma Bolger of CFFC about the lessons that other local charities and community groups could take from their extraordinary campaign. Why not read more here!    
    1581 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • Huge congratulations go to Community Foundation for Calderdale for winning both best fundraising campaign at the Third Sector Awards 2016 and Fundraising Team of the Year: with an income under £5 million at the Charity Times Awards 2016.  On Boxing Day 2015 Storm Eva caused the River Calder to burst it's banks – the subsequent flooding had a devestating impact on businesses and homes across Calderdale. CFFC Immediately responded by launching its Calderdale Flood Fund to help rebuild the community.  Working closely with both local and national media, corporates and voluntary goups, CFFC raised over £2.5 million to support the community in its recovery - £250,000 of which came through its Localgiving appeal page. It was truly inspiring to witness the creativity and hard-work put into this campaign, and to have had the opportunity to play a role in its success.  In March we spoke to Emma Bolger of CFFC about the lessons that other local charities and community groups could take from their extraordinary campaign. Why not read more here!    
    Sep 29, 2016 1581
  • 11 Aug 2016
    Hi, I’m Mollie, I’m 17 and I am Chair of EGO’s Youth Management team!                                                    This year EGO Performance is celebrating 10 years of working with hundreds of the most amazing people. People of all ages, from all walks of life, with different abilities and different needs.  We’ve had the greatest pleasure in offering them many opportunities and a creative space that has allowed them to find their confidence and discover their talents as well as making great friends along the way.  We have seen first hand how this work truly changes peoples lives and how it can bring communities together, and we plan to continue to develop our work for many more years to come.   At EGO we’re not scared of a challenge, but this one is  pretty massive!  We need to raise £1.1 million to purchase the building that we currently occupy.  We are in danger of being forced out of our home, an arts centre that the members, volunteers and staff have worked so hard to create. So we’ve decided there’s only one way forward, we need to buy it! EGO Arts Venue was a concept imagined by young people - that is now a reality.  It was created because there was a huge need for creative space in the city. Since we’ve been here we have worked with many different community organisations. It is now needed more than ever. Please help us keep our arts venue. It means a whole lot more to people than just a building; it’s a safe, caring environment where people are entertained and have fun. It is also a venue where they can get a hot meal, a hug, free wifi to speak to their family, even just to get out of the rain - all the things that make our city a better place. You can really help by making a cash donation, ideas, enthusiasm and contacts and sharing our story with your friends and family. Want to find out more? come and visit us! To donate, visit our EGO 1.1 appeal page to make a donation: www.localgiving.org/appeal/EGO/ Or donate monthly via credit or debit card visit on our Localgiving page: www.localgiving.com/charity/egoperformance Spread the word, join us on Facebook , Twitter, Instagram and, best of all, speak to people you know and tell them why EGO matters. Without the kind and generous support from people like you, we simply wouldn’t exist. Thank you! Mollie Smith, Chair of EGO’s Youth Management team:  "As the Chair of EGO's Youth Management Team I have the opportunity to work with all members from our various groups, along with the Board of Trustees to make important decisions about EGO's future- one of which being to purchase our building! I have never met a more diverse or interesting group of people than I have here at EGO and I can honestly say that they are like my second family. My life without EGO would be infinitely different: it has increased my confidence tenfold, given me lifelong friends and has taught me things school never could. I hope EGO continues for many more years to come so that other people can benefit from EGO's inspirational work, like I have.  I really hope that everyone reading this believes that EGO 1.1 is as important as I do, not only to the members, but also to the community and Coventry as a whole!" Found this blog post useful? You may also like:   Rio 2016 Olympics: Podiums & Playing FieldsHealthy giving for Healthy Living!4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment How Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity  
    2148 Posted by Molly Smith
  • Hi, I’m Mollie, I’m 17 and I am Chair of EGO’s Youth Management team!                                                    This year EGO Performance is celebrating 10 years of working with hundreds of the most amazing people. People of all ages, from all walks of life, with different abilities and different needs.  We’ve had the greatest pleasure in offering them many opportunities and a creative space that has allowed them to find their confidence and discover their talents as well as making great friends along the way.  We have seen first hand how this work truly changes peoples lives and how it can bring communities together, and we plan to continue to develop our work for many more years to come.   At EGO we’re not scared of a challenge, but this one is  pretty massive!  We need to raise £1.1 million to purchase the building that we currently occupy.  We are in danger of being forced out of our home, an arts centre that the members, volunteers and staff have worked so hard to create. So we’ve decided there’s only one way forward, we need to buy it! EGO Arts Venue was a concept imagined by young people - that is now a reality.  It was created because there was a huge need for creative space in the city. Since we’ve been here we have worked with many different community organisations. It is now needed more than ever. Please help us keep our arts venue. It means a whole lot more to people than just a building; it’s a safe, caring environment where people are entertained and have fun. It is also a venue where they can get a hot meal, a hug, free wifi to speak to their family, even just to get out of the rain - all the things that make our city a better place. You can really help by making a cash donation, ideas, enthusiasm and contacts and sharing our story with your friends and family. Want to find out more? come and visit us! To donate, visit our EGO 1.1 appeal page to make a donation: www.localgiving.org/appeal/EGO/ Or donate monthly via credit or debit card visit on our Localgiving page: www.localgiving.com/charity/egoperformance Spread the word, join us on Facebook , Twitter, Instagram and, best of all, speak to people you know and tell them why EGO matters. Without the kind and generous support from people like you, we simply wouldn’t exist. Thank you! Mollie Smith, Chair of EGO’s Youth Management team:  "As the Chair of EGO's Youth Management Team I have the opportunity to work with all members from our various groups, along with the Board of Trustees to make important decisions about EGO's future- one of which being to purchase our building! I have never met a more diverse or interesting group of people than I have here at EGO and I can honestly say that they are like my second family. My life without EGO would be infinitely different: it has increased my confidence tenfold, given me lifelong friends and has taught me things school never could. I hope EGO continues for many more years to come so that other people can benefit from EGO's inspirational work, like I have.  I really hope that everyone reading this believes that EGO 1.1 is as important as I do, not only to the members, but also to the community and Coventry as a whole!" Found this blog post useful? You may also like:   Rio 2016 Olympics: Podiums & Playing FieldsHealthy giving for Healthy Living!4 Steps to the perfect charity VideoHow Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment How Google Grants can provide £78,000 to your Charity  
    Aug 11, 2016 2148
  • 05 Aug 2016
    From Murray’s tears of triumph to Ronaldo tears of pain – this is turning into a very special summer of sport. And with the Rio Olympics kicking off tonight –the longest leaps and greatest feats are yet to come! For two weeks the nation’s hopes will be tied the heels of Mo Farah and the gloves of Nicola Adams. For two weeks, our hearts will be forged to the fortunes of the Olympic Refugee Athletes. For two weeks we will all become armchair judges and referees for sports we’ve barely heard of.            However, what really matters is what happens once the medals are totted up and the flags taken down. At Localgiving, we have seen the life changing power of sport. We know that the podiums in Rio are no more important than the playing fields of Rotherham. We are proud to work with grassroots sports groups across the length and breadth of UK – from hockey in Armagh to athletics in Daventry to cricket in Kettering. We see the incredible impact that they have, every day - nurturing future athletes;  delivering  exercise classes for older people;  providing affordable activities for  disadvantaged people and a safe space for vulnerable groups. Below are just a few of the groups that Localgiving supports.   Search HERE to find a team near you. - Whether cheering for them on a wet Wednesday night or donating to them once a month - you can do your bit to keep grassroots sports alive.  Sport 4 Life UK - Birmingham – works with young people who have struggled at school or developed behavioural issues; experienced long-term unemployment or been involved in the criminal justice system.  Uses a sports-themed educational programmes to develop their life skills, improve their health, transform their behaviour, gain a qualification, or find a job. Belfast Community Sports Development Network – Belfast - provides sport and physical activity to clubs, community groups and school across Belfast. These programmes engage young people, older people, people with disabilities and people living in areas of deprivation. Sports Driving Unlimited - South West Scotland, Cumbria and Lancashire - provides opportunities for people of all ages with impairment, terminal illness or who are disadvantaged to take part in the exciting and challenging sport of pony driving. Steelers Wheelers Sports Club –  Scunthorpe - offers people with disabilities the opportunity to take part in sport.    Special Olympics clubs across the UK provide sport & leisure opportunities for local people with a learning disabilities. We have members in  Plymouth, Bournemouth, Sandwell and the Isle of Wight Hurstpierpoint Gymnastics Club  - Sussex - provides gymnastics training and sport related activities for boys & girls aged 3 to 16 years. The club  offers affordable fees and a free subsidised places.   Winchester Sport, Art and Leisure Trust – works to secure a sustainable legacy from the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics for Winchester, in the form of new sports facilities. Sport in Mind - Reading – provides supported sport and physical activity sessions to help aid the recovery of people experiencing mental health problems and empowers them to build a positive future for themselves.   Isle of Mull Rugby Club - After growing tired of relying on favours from the local community (which meant having to stop games due to landing aircraft or cleaning up cowpats before games), Isle of Mull Rugby Club now provides sporting facilities for the island.       Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandThe Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroEuro 2016: A Time to Support your Grassroots Teams  Top image courtesy of Daventry Amateur Athletic Club
    1661 Posted by Lewis Garland
  • From Murray’s tears of triumph to Ronaldo tears of pain – this is turning into a very special summer of sport. And with the Rio Olympics kicking off tonight –the longest leaps and greatest feats are yet to come! For two weeks the nation’s hopes will be tied the heels of Mo Farah and the gloves of Nicola Adams. For two weeks, our hearts will be forged to the fortunes of the Olympic Refugee Athletes. For two weeks we will all become armchair judges and referees for sports we’ve barely heard of.            However, what really matters is what happens once the medals are totted up and the flags taken down. At Localgiving, we have seen the life changing power of sport. We know that the podiums in Rio are no more important than the playing fields of Rotherham. We are proud to work with grassroots sports groups across the length and breadth of UK – from hockey in Armagh to athletics in Daventry to cricket in Kettering. We see the incredible impact that they have, every day - nurturing future athletes;  delivering  exercise classes for older people;  providing affordable activities for  disadvantaged people and a safe space for vulnerable groups. Below are just a few of the groups that Localgiving supports.   Search HERE to find a team near you. - Whether cheering for them on a wet Wednesday night or donating to them once a month - you can do your bit to keep grassroots sports alive.  Sport 4 Life UK - Birmingham – works with young people who have struggled at school or developed behavioural issues; experienced long-term unemployment or been involved in the criminal justice system.  Uses a sports-themed educational programmes to develop their life skills, improve their health, transform their behaviour, gain a qualification, or find a job. Belfast Community Sports Development Network – Belfast - provides sport and physical activity to clubs, community groups and school across Belfast. These programmes engage young people, older people, people with disabilities and people living in areas of deprivation. Sports Driving Unlimited - South West Scotland, Cumbria and Lancashire - provides opportunities for people of all ages with impairment, terminal illness or who are disadvantaged to take part in the exciting and challenging sport of pony driving. Steelers Wheelers Sports Club –  Scunthorpe - offers people with disabilities the opportunity to take part in sport.    Special Olympics clubs across the UK provide sport & leisure opportunities for local people with a learning disabilities. We have members in  Plymouth, Bournemouth, Sandwell and the Isle of Wight Hurstpierpoint Gymnastics Club  - Sussex - provides gymnastics training and sport related activities for boys & girls aged 3 to 16 years. The club  offers affordable fees and a free subsidised places.   Winchester Sport, Art and Leisure Trust – works to secure a sustainable legacy from the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics for Winchester, in the form of new sports facilities. Sport in Mind - Reading – provides supported sport and physical activity sessions to help aid the recovery of people experiencing mental health problems and empowers them to build a positive future for themselves.   Isle of Mull Rugby Club - After growing tired of relying on favours from the local community (which meant having to stop games due to landing aircraft or cleaning up cowpats before games), Isle of Mull Rugby Club now provides sporting facilities for the island.       Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Refugee Crisis: make a difference on your doorstep by Lewis GarlandThe Sky is the limit for daring Granny WendyDawn rises over Mount KilimanjaroEuro 2016: A Time to Support your Grassroots Teams  Top image courtesy of Daventry Amateur Athletic Club
    Aug 05, 2016 1661