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  • 05 Sep 2014
    The Charity Engagement team’s newest member Cara joined Annalisa on a visit to Global Generation’s community garden in Kings Cross, London. In this blog post she tells us about her encounter and what she learnt about the fantastic work the charity is doing. It’s my second week at Localgiving and to celebrate, Annalisa and I went on a Charity Engagement Team Adventure to Global Generation’s ‘The Skip Garden’ near King’s Cross. We enjoyed our morning exploring and learning about the garden's mission to foster an understanding of self, others, the environment through the medium of community gardening, educational programmes, and lots of climbing into colourfu, repurposed skips. We almost thought we were in the wrong place when we arrived at what looked like a construction site, but a friendly builder assured us that yes, there is a community garden plonked in one of Europe’s largest development sites. When we entered the garden, we saw chillies, pears, ginger, aloe vera and flowers of all kinds growing in skips and recycled containers. And butterflies!  We had a really interesting meeting with Nicole who told us about Global Generation and its mission to ‘harness the positive spirit of young people as catalysts for environmental and social change’ - the project is about much more than just growing vegetables. The garden is a powerhouse of unique work focussed on giving young people a broad and holistic perspective of who they are, the environment, and how the two relate.  Wanting to stay true to the urban environments that is the context for the lives of many young people, Nicole told us that The Skip Garden is happy to be positioned in the middle of a building site; their green garden is completely mobile (hence the skips) and migrates as the concrete jungle around them develops, opening up a new pocket of colourful garden for local people to enjoy. We saw Global Generation’s vision reflected in everything that they do from maintaining corporate partnerships that involve the local community, to using materials from the construction site to build the garden. Nicole told us that they have some of their meetings in skips, and used them as immersive reflection spaces for young people – we jumped in and found it pretty nice to be surrounded by plants, flowers and fruit. From a funding perspective, Global Generation is mature in its thinking; following a cut in funding from the Big Lottery Fund, their diversified income streams are a shining example of how local charities can adapt, and make themselves less vulnerable to any once funding source. The list is endless: The Skip Garden works closely with construction companies at Kings Cross Central, runs a café, hosts supper clubs, is available for venue hire, provides training and out of the ordinary social events for businesses, stocks seasonal flower beds for nearby restaurants, sells produce to the nearby office of The Guardian, maintains a roof-top vegetable garden on top of Wolff Olins, and has a ‘flying café’ which flits around the area selling meals made with produce from the garden form a purpose build bike. (…and breathe!) The Skip Garden has lots of exciting plans and I am looking forward to supporting their fundraising through Localgiving – our crowdfunding feature will be launched soon, and will be a really good tool for the charity to use. It will create a platform for project-specific fundraising, and will hopefully present a high impact opportunity for supporters to donate and get involved in supporting the project.  Although London is full of greens spaces, to me, The Skip Garden offers a lot more than a simple park; I saw a lively team of people, with an exciting mission, focussed heavily on interaction – all of which puts my wilting basil plant to shame. Highlights included ‘orchard skip’, ‘polly skip’, seeing ginger growing (who knew it could be grown in pots?!), some ceramics from Central St Martins, the behives and wormery, a bicycle powered irrigation system, pizza ovens … and wildflowers growing out of hard hats – an image which, to me, sort of sums of what Global Generation is all about. Find out more about Global Generation and support them here.
    1049 Posted by Cara Sanquest
  • The Charity Engagement team’s newest member Cara joined Annalisa on a visit to Global Generation’s community garden in Kings Cross, London. In this blog post she tells us about her encounter and what she learnt about the fantastic work the charity is doing. It’s my second week at Localgiving and to celebrate, Annalisa and I went on a Charity Engagement Team Adventure to Global Generation’s ‘The Skip Garden’ near King’s Cross. We enjoyed our morning exploring and learning about the garden's mission to foster an understanding of self, others, the environment through the medium of community gardening, educational programmes, and lots of climbing into colourfu, repurposed skips. We almost thought we were in the wrong place when we arrived at what looked like a construction site, but a friendly builder assured us that yes, there is a community garden plonked in one of Europe’s largest development sites. When we entered the garden, we saw chillies, pears, ginger, aloe vera and flowers of all kinds growing in skips and recycled containers. And butterflies!  We had a really interesting meeting with Nicole who told us about Global Generation and its mission to ‘harness the positive spirit of young people as catalysts for environmental and social change’ - the project is about much more than just growing vegetables. The garden is a powerhouse of unique work focussed on giving young people a broad and holistic perspective of who they are, the environment, and how the two relate.  Wanting to stay true to the urban environments that is the context for the lives of many young people, Nicole told us that The Skip Garden is happy to be positioned in the middle of a building site; their green garden is completely mobile (hence the skips) and migrates as the concrete jungle around them develops, opening up a new pocket of colourful garden for local people to enjoy. We saw Global Generation’s vision reflected in everything that they do from maintaining corporate partnerships that involve the local community, to using materials from the construction site to build the garden. Nicole told us that they have some of their meetings in skips, and used them as immersive reflection spaces for young people – we jumped in and found it pretty nice to be surrounded by plants, flowers and fruit. From a funding perspective, Global Generation is mature in its thinking; following a cut in funding from the Big Lottery Fund, their diversified income streams are a shining example of how local charities can adapt, and make themselves less vulnerable to any once funding source. The list is endless: The Skip Garden works closely with construction companies at Kings Cross Central, runs a café, hosts supper clubs, is available for venue hire, provides training and out of the ordinary social events for businesses, stocks seasonal flower beds for nearby restaurants, sells produce to the nearby office of The Guardian, maintains a roof-top vegetable garden on top of Wolff Olins, and has a ‘flying café’ which flits around the area selling meals made with produce from the garden form a purpose build bike. (…and breathe!) The Skip Garden has lots of exciting plans and I am looking forward to supporting their fundraising through Localgiving – our crowdfunding feature will be launched soon, and will be a really good tool for the charity to use. It will create a platform for project-specific fundraising, and will hopefully present a high impact opportunity for supporters to donate and get involved in supporting the project.  Although London is full of greens spaces, to me, The Skip Garden offers a lot more than a simple park; I saw a lively team of people, with an exciting mission, focussed heavily on interaction – all of which puts my wilting basil plant to shame. Highlights included ‘orchard skip’, ‘polly skip’, seeing ginger growing (who knew it could be grown in pots?!), some ceramics from Central St Martins, the behives and wormery, a bicycle powered irrigation system, pizza ovens … and wildflowers growing out of hard hats – an image which, to me, sort of sums of what Global Generation is all about. Find out more about Global Generation and support them here.
    Sep 05, 2014 1049
  • 13 Feb 2014
    Good Neighbours is a community minibus and volunteer car scheme that provides transport for anyone over 60 and those with a disability in and around the Whitby and Scarborough area. The scheme was launched in 1996, to provide transport for people who were unable to use other forms of transport to access essential services. The scheme operates mostly in rural areas and covers an area of approximately 500 square miles. Alan Lund, Manager of Good Neighbours says the scheme allows people to overcome social and rural isolation in order to maintain an independent lifestyle. “Typically our volunteers support older people to attend hospital and doctors appointments and other health related journeys such as podiatry, opticians, dentists and day centres.” In addition to this, many of the members simply use it for social or everyday tasks such as going to the supermarket or simply to visit friends and relatives. Good Neighbours is set to receive funding cuts from for the next financial year. This makes donations and fundraising all the more important to keep the service running. A £100 donation through Localgiving would keep the community minibus running for two weeks and continue to reduce isolation in rural areas. Last year Good Neighbours’ volunteers provided just over 15,000 passenger journeys, covering in excess of 112,000 miles and provided support for more than 1,150 elderly people. Any reduction to this service, would represent a huge loss to those that rely on it. “Communities need to look after their own and a scheme like ourselves in a remote area such as ours with a high elderly population and low car ownership is vital.” concludes Alan. “Not only to the well being of many families, but it gives older people independence and allows them to remain in their own homes without having to constantly rely on family members to transport them around”. Learn more about Good Neighbours Community Transport
    822 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Good Neighbours is a community minibus and volunteer car scheme that provides transport for anyone over 60 and those with a disability in and around the Whitby and Scarborough area. The scheme was launched in 1996, to provide transport for people who were unable to use other forms of transport to access essential services. The scheme operates mostly in rural areas and covers an area of approximately 500 square miles. Alan Lund, Manager of Good Neighbours says the scheme allows people to overcome social and rural isolation in order to maintain an independent lifestyle. “Typically our volunteers support older people to attend hospital and doctors appointments and other health related journeys such as podiatry, opticians, dentists and day centres.” In addition to this, many of the members simply use it for social or everyday tasks such as going to the supermarket or simply to visit friends and relatives. Good Neighbours is set to receive funding cuts from for the next financial year. This makes donations and fundraising all the more important to keep the service running. A £100 donation through Localgiving would keep the community minibus running for two weeks and continue to reduce isolation in rural areas. Last year Good Neighbours’ volunteers provided just over 15,000 passenger journeys, covering in excess of 112,000 miles and provided support for more than 1,150 elderly people. Any reduction to this service, would represent a huge loss to those that rely on it. “Communities need to look after their own and a scheme like ourselves in a remote area such as ours with a high elderly population and low car ownership is vital.” concludes Alan. “Not only to the well being of many families, but it gives older people independence and allows them to remain in their own homes without having to constantly rely on family members to transport them around”. Learn more about Good Neighbours Community Transport
    Feb 13, 2014 822
  • 14 Feb 2014
    The Samaritans provide a listening ear to anyone in distress. Through their listening services, they have been providing care, support or simply just a friendly voice since 1953. This year, marks the 50th anniversary of the Northallerton and the Dales branch of the Samaritans which not only serves to highlight its success, but also its essential need in the community. At the time of its creation, it was the first rural branch in the country, providing much needed support to those who need it. 50 years later, as well as the traditional face-to-face support, they now offer a text and email service making sure everyone has the opportunity to be heard. The Samaritans is run entirely on the good will and hard work of a team of 50 volunteers. “We have no paid staff or fundraisers.” says Pamela Moffat, Fundraising Coordinator. “We are an individual charity and receive no outside funding or financial assistance from our headquarters.” It costs £18,000 a year to keep the Samaritans branch functioning, providing not only the listening service, but also outreach work into the community. This includes working in schools to address bullying and suicide issues, as well as local partnerships with Army Welfare groups, Network Rail and British Transport Police. How could you help the group? A £100 donation to the Northallerton and Dale Samaritans would cover the running costs of the charity for two whole days. Two days in which they could help someone in emotional crisis, going through hardship or in the extreme, prevent someone from taking their own life. “Without the Samaritans, their needs at a time of crisis might not be met and in a worst case scenario, could result in suicide” says Pamela. She also notes that it is not a “too infrequent occurrence” to be thanked publicly by someone who has been helped by the Samaritans, leaving no doubt about the impact of the Samaritans work in the community. “We need donations to keep running which in turn, continues to provide training for volunteers, lessens the strain on other Samaritan branches and ensures that every important call will be answered” something that Pamela acknowledges is just as important in their 50th year as it was in their first. Learn more about the Samaritans of Northallerton & the Dales
    963 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • The Samaritans provide a listening ear to anyone in distress. Through their listening services, they have been providing care, support or simply just a friendly voice since 1953. This year, marks the 50th anniversary of the Northallerton and the Dales branch of the Samaritans which not only serves to highlight its success, but also its essential need in the community. At the time of its creation, it was the first rural branch in the country, providing much needed support to those who need it. 50 years later, as well as the traditional face-to-face support, they now offer a text and email service making sure everyone has the opportunity to be heard. The Samaritans is run entirely on the good will and hard work of a team of 50 volunteers. “We have no paid staff or fundraisers.” says Pamela Moffat, Fundraising Coordinator. “We are an individual charity and receive no outside funding or financial assistance from our headquarters.” It costs £18,000 a year to keep the Samaritans branch functioning, providing not only the listening service, but also outreach work into the community. This includes working in schools to address bullying and suicide issues, as well as local partnerships with Army Welfare groups, Network Rail and British Transport Police. How could you help the group? A £100 donation to the Northallerton and Dale Samaritans would cover the running costs of the charity for two whole days. Two days in which they could help someone in emotional crisis, going through hardship or in the extreme, prevent someone from taking their own life. “Without the Samaritans, their needs at a time of crisis might not be met and in a worst case scenario, could result in suicide” says Pamela. She also notes that it is not a “too infrequent occurrence” to be thanked publicly by someone who has been helped by the Samaritans, leaving no doubt about the impact of the Samaritans work in the community. “We need donations to keep running which in turn, continues to provide training for volunteers, lessens the strain on other Samaritan branches and ensures that every important call will be answered” something that Pamela acknowledges is just as important in their 50th year as it was in their first. Learn more about the Samaritans of Northallerton & the Dales
    Feb 14, 2014 963
  • 04 Mar 2014
    Clarence Gardens Association (CGA) is a charity that provides space for people with enduring mental health issues and learning disabilities, to take part in activities, socialise and develop new skills. Activities range from music, sport, to crafts and games allowing a range of activities for everyone to take part in. Rachel Barber, Manager of Clarence Gardens Association, is proud that the centre provides a range of diverse and exciting opportunities. “There is nothing like CGA in York where we can meet the needs of individuals with flexibility and understanding. The centre is a place where people with enduring mental health troubles and/or learning disability can try something new and meet others who have been affected by ill health.” CGA supports people who live in care homes and in the community, providing a safety net where they can offload and address any problems. One in four people will suffer from poor mental health so with CGA providing a clear skills-based focus, it helps to build meaning and resilience in members’ lives as well as being able to signpost and help them get the support they need before a crisis. Without this, Rachel believes many members would have very little incentive or motivations in their lives. “The facilities enables all to engage in purposeful and meaningful activities that gives them a focus. Without this many member’s health deteriorates, which for some can mean being sectioned. As well as providing a focus we provide a means of helping people improving and maintaining their physical and mental health. Any signs of deterioration is picked up and used to develop a support plan to avoid a crisis.” What a donation could do A donation to Clarence Garden Association would mean that members can continue to enjoy exciting and varied experiences as well as access immediate and essential support. For instance, a £100 donation through Localgiving would enable a music therapist to work with members, giving them the chance to explore the freedom of expression and therapeutic benefits music provides. The work of CGA has benefited countless members, including helping volunteers find employment, discover new skills or successfully selling their craftwork at local shops. One such instance is Olivia*, who had been through many hardships with several bereavements in her family and as well as illnesses herself. Though CGA, she learnt a number of skills including how to use a sewing machine, making high quality stockings, cushions. CGA helped her to get out of the house and meet new people in a safe environment. Rachel says that her proudest moments are when they “meet at least one of the aspirations of every single member”. The work CGA do has without doubt, given people hope and excitement as they discover new skills. “I have been thrilled when a member finds out what he or she is good at something as it gives them so much confidence.” concludes Rachel. “This helps towards the journey of recovery”. Through Localgiving, Clarence Gardens Association has raised almost £7,000 in just over a year and benefited from two match fund campaigns. Learn more about Clarence Gardens Association *Names have been changed to protect identities.
    673 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Clarence Gardens Association (CGA) is a charity that provides space for people with enduring mental health issues and learning disabilities, to take part in activities, socialise and develop new skills. Activities range from music, sport, to crafts and games allowing a range of activities for everyone to take part in. Rachel Barber, Manager of Clarence Gardens Association, is proud that the centre provides a range of diverse and exciting opportunities. “There is nothing like CGA in York where we can meet the needs of individuals with flexibility and understanding. The centre is a place where people with enduring mental health troubles and/or learning disability can try something new and meet others who have been affected by ill health.” CGA supports people who live in care homes and in the community, providing a safety net where they can offload and address any problems. One in four people will suffer from poor mental health so with CGA providing a clear skills-based focus, it helps to build meaning and resilience in members’ lives as well as being able to signpost and help them get the support they need before a crisis. Without this, Rachel believes many members would have very little incentive or motivations in their lives. “The facilities enables all to engage in purposeful and meaningful activities that gives them a focus. Without this many member’s health deteriorates, which for some can mean being sectioned. As well as providing a focus we provide a means of helping people improving and maintaining their physical and mental health. Any signs of deterioration is picked up and used to develop a support plan to avoid a crisis.” What a donation could do A donation to Clarence Garden Association would mean that members can continue to enjoy exciting and varied experiences as well as access immediate and essential support. For instance, a £100 donation through Localgiving would enable a music therapist to work with members, giving them the chance to explore the freedom of expression and therapeutic benefits music provides. The work of CGA has benefited countless members, including helping volunteers find employment, discover new skills or successfully selling their craftwork at local shops. One such instance is Olivia*, who had been through many hardships with several bereavements in her family and as well as illnesses herself. Though CGA, she learnt a number of skills including how to use a sewing machine, making high quality stockings, cushions. CGA helped her to get out of the house and meet new people in a safe environment. Rachel says that her proudest moments are when they “meet at least one of the aspirations of every single member”. The work CGA do has without doubt, given people hope and excitement as they discover new skills. “I have been thrilled when a member finds out what he or she is good at something as it gives them so much confidence.” concludes Rachel. “This helps towards the journey of recovery”. Through Localgiving, Clarence Gardens Association has raised almost £7,000 in just over a year and benefited from two match fund campaigns. Learn more about Clarence Gardens Association *Names have been changed to protect identities.
    Mar 04, 2014 673
  • 05 Mar 2014
    Localgiving Featured Charity: Tyneside Women’s Health Tyneside Women’s Health is a small charity with centres in Gateshead & Newcastle which supports women to improve their mental health and emotional wellbeing. They provide a safe space for women and opportunities for recovery including mental health courses, support groups, counselling and therapeutic activities; enabling women to achieve their personal potential and help them to feel good. Kate Mukungu, CEO of Tyneside Women’s Health assesses that ensuring sustainability is the biggest issue facing Tyneside Women’s Health, like all charities in coming years. Since joining Localgiving.com in late spring 2011, the charity has gained a new presence on the internet, raising their profile and most importantly, the facility to allow their supporters to donate online. “We have always dedicated a lot of time to fundraising applications but we never before had the facility where people in the community could donate to us in such a quick and convenient way.” The charity wasted no time in letting their supporters know about their new webpage on Localgiving. They have added the Localgiving button to their email signatures and webpage so that donors can find them on the site with ease. They also sent out leaflets to supporters, further promoting their page. The monies raised on Localgiving will benefit Tyneside Women’s Health as it will enable them to continue with the great work they are doing and provide even more invaluable services for the women in their local community. “Since we secured the online donation facility through localgiving our team has organised some amazing fundraising events, including a zip slide from the Tyne Bridge. It’s just so helpful to be able to offer people convenient way to make a contribution”. Tyneside Women’s Health held an International Women’s Day event on the 7th March to inspire women for the year ahead.  “A great day was had by all at Tyneside Women’s Health’s 2014 International women’s day event. Loads of prizes were won on the tombola and women contributed some really powerful advice to our ‘inspirational graffiti board’. We finished off with an energising singing session. Thank you and well done to all who participated!” Mandy Snee, Community Mental Health Worker Please click on the link below to find out more about the fantastic work that Tyneside Women’s Health is doing in their local community. http://localgiving.com/tynesidewomenshealth
    769 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Localgiving Featured Charity: Tyneside Women’s Health Tyneside Women’s Health is a small charity with centres in Gateshead & Newcastle which supports women to improve their mental health and emotional wellbeing. They provide a safe space for women and opportunities for recovery including mental health courses, support groups, counselling and therapeutic activities; enabling women to achieve their personal potential and help them to feel good. Kate Mukungu, CEO of Tyneside Women’s Health assesses that ensuring sustainability is the biggest issue facing Tyneside Women’s Health, like all charities in coming years. Since joining Localgiving.com in late spring 2011, the charity has gained a new presence on the internet, raising their profile and most importantly, the facility to allow their supporters to donate online. “We have always dedicated a lot of time to fundraising applications but we never before had the facility where people in the community could donate to us in such a quick and convenient way.” The charity wasted no time in letting their supporters know about their new webpage on Localgiving. They have added the Localgiving button to their email signatures and webpage so that donors can find them on the site with ease. They also sent out leaflets to supporters, further promoting their page. The monies raised on Localgiving will benefit Tyneside Women’s Health as it will enable them to continue with the great work they are doing and provide even more invaluable services for the women in their local community. “Since we secured the online donation facility through localgiving our team has organised some amazing fundraising events, including a zip slide from the Tyne Bridge. It’s just so helpful to be able to offer people convenient way to make a contribution”. Tyneside Women’s Health held an International Women’s Day event on the 7th March to inspire women for the year ahead.  “A great day was had by all at Tyneside Women’s Health’s 2014 International women’s day event. Loads of prizes were won on the tombola and women contributed some really powerful advice to our ‘inspirational graffiti board’. We finished off with an energising singing session. Thank you and well done to all who participated!” Mandy Snee, Community Mental Health Worker Please click on the link below to find out more about the fantastic work that Tyneside Women’s Health is doing in their local community. http://localgiving.com/tynesidewomenshealth
    Mar 05, 2014 769
  • 04 Apr 2014
    Since 2011 Community Greenspace has been supporting local people from different backgrounds through activities that are not only of social but also environmental benefit. The majority of their work is done in mid-Cornwall with a specific focus on the China Clay Villages, which is an area of social deprivation. Their main goal is to encourage people to get more involved in creating and maintaining local greenspaces. Through their ‘Growing Together Project’ they have operated a garden-share and tool-bank scheme and continuously support local people to establish community gardens and other environmental areas. Localgiving’s ‘Charity begins in Cornwall’ campaign is an exciting opportunity for us to raise vital funds to continue our work Guy Doncaster, Secretary at Community Greenspace, talks about the opportunity to take part inLocalgiving’s Match fund campaign that is currently doubling donations for charities in Cornwall, and explains how the money raised through it will help to continue their great work. “Within the first year of our formation we obtained funding from the Lotteries Local Food programme to deliver a garden share project within the China Clay area. Unfortunately this funding has now ceased and we are in need of additional money to support our work. That’s why we were really excited when we heard about Localgiving’s Match fund. Being one of the charities that benefits from the £20,000 pot is super exciting for us as it allows us to raise over £4000 for our group. The money would help us develop our activities further as well as enable us to employ staff who are experienced in community development and horticultural activities. Hiring dedicated staff would allow us to reach more people, co-ordinate public workshops on horticulture and realize more of the great ideas we regularly receive from local residents." Getting ‘me time’ while helping others One of them is Diana Padwick, who wanted to establish a pocket community garden in St Dennis after volunteering at our practical activities. With the help of Community Greenspace Diana has developed a community garden at Clay TAWC in St Dennis and oversees volunteering at the site 2 days a month. This project has not only given her the opportunity to have some ‘me’ time, away from the responsibilities of everyday life, but also provided her with horticultural therapy. She is now a member of the Organisations Board of Directors at Community Greenspace and we are very proud to have her in our group. "We are very passionate about our engagement with local people and the ability to make a difference for them but also our environment. We believe our work has provided communities, many of whom are socially disadvantaged, to become more confident and capable of self-help. Without our commitment a number of existing community gardens would disappear, whilst new ones would not be developed. That’s why we are really keen to take advantage of the Match fund campaign.” If you want to support Community Greenspace, visit their page on Localgiving.
    881 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Since 2011 Community Greenspace has been supporting local people from different backgrounds through activities that are not only of social but also environmental benefit. The majority of their work is done in mid-Cornwall with a specific focus on the China Clay Villages, which is an area of social deprivation. Their main goal is to encourage people to get more involved in creating and maintaining local greenspaces. Through their ‘Growing Together Project’ they have operated a garden-share and tool-bank scheme and continuously support local people to establish community gardens and other environmental areas. Localgiving’s ‘Charity begins in Cornwall’ campaign is an exciting opportunity for us to raise vital funds to continue our work Guy Doncaster, Secretary at Community Greenspace, talks about the opportunity to take part inLocalgiving’s Match fund campaign that is currently doubling donations for charities in Cornwall, and explains how the money raised through it will help to continue their great work. “Within the first year of our formation we obtained funding from the Lotteries Local Food programme to deliver a garden share project within the China Clay area. Unfortunately this funding has now ceased and we are in need of additional money to support our work. That’s why we were really excited when we heard about Localgiving’s Match fund. Being one of the charities that benefits from the £20,000 pot is super exciting for us as it allows us to raise over £4000 for our group. The money would help us develop our activities further as well as enable us to employ staff who are experienced in community development and horticultural activities. Hiring dedicated staff would allow us to reach more people, co-ordinate public workshops on horticulture and realize more of the great ideas we regularly receive from local residents." Getting ‘me time’ while helping others One of them is Diana Padwick, who wanted to establish a pocket community garden in St Dennis after volunteering at our practical activities. With the help of Community Greenspace Diana has developed a community garden at Clay TAWC in St Dennis and oversees volunteering at the site 2 days a month. This project has not only given her the opportunity to have some ‘me’ time, away from the responsibilities of everyday life, but also provided her with horticultural therapy. She is now a member of the Organisations Board of Directors at Community Greenspace and we are very proud to have her in our group. "We are very passionate about our engagement with local people and the ability to make a difference for them but also our environment. We believe our work has provided communities, many of whom are socially disadvantaged, to become more confident and capable of self-help. Without our commitment a number of existing community gardens would disappear, whilst new ones would not be developed. That’s why we are really keen to take advantage of the Match fund campaign.” If you want to support Community Greenspace, visit their page on Localgiving.
    Apr 04, 2014 881
  • 03 Apr 2014
    Helping young people to be active members of a community and enhancing their health and fitness are the key goals of the Whixley and District Cricket Club. Richard Watson, Chair of Trustees, who has seen the community-led sports club grow over the years, sees it as an integral part of the community’s future and the money raised through Localgiving is a crucial support to sustain it. “Like all charities, Whixley Cricket Club depends on donations and with over £11,000 raised through Localgiving we are now able to further expand our work and positive impact on the community. Localgiving has allowed us to appeal to a wider range of donors; and the opportunity to participate in match funding provides impetus in our fundraising programmes as we encourage supporters to realise our vision for the club. It’s a win-win situation where the community directly benefits from the investment they put into it. I have always been involved in community activities and have seen several of these local organisations cease to exist. We are determined to never let this happen, because without the club, rural life in Whixley would lose one of its remaining treasures. Seeing countless young people from a range of backgrounds engage with each other in a friendly and competitive sporting environment, through which they’ve developed into mature and responsible community members, gives me and our team of leaders, deep satisfaction. One of our members even qualified as a cricket coach and has now has his own business providing training sessions to schools and holiday clubs. Whixley CC has continued to thrive due to the enthusiasm and commitment of its members. We are bound together in sustaining a thriving community that contributes to everyone’s wellbeing. I think this is worth valuing, supporting, and working for.” Learn more about Whixley CC on their Localgiving page
    1183 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Helping young people to be active members of a community and enhancing their health and fitness are the key goals of the Whixley and District Cricket Club. Richard Watson, Chair of Trustees, who has seen the community-led sports club grow over the years, sees it as an integral part of the community’s future and the money raised through Localgiving is a crucial support to sustain it. “Like all charities, Whixley Cricket Club depends on donations and with over £11,000 raised through Localgiving we are now able to further expand our work and positive impact on the community. Localgiving has allowed us to appeal to a wider range of donors; and the opportunity to participate in match funding provides impetus in our fundraising programmes as we encourage supporters to realise our vision for the club. It’s a win-win situation where the community directly benefits from the investment they put into it. I have always been involved in community activities and have seen several of these local organisations cease to exist. We are determined to never let this happen, because without the club, rural life in Whixley would lose one of its remaining treasures. Seeing countless young people from a range of backgrounds engage with each other in a friendly and competitive sporting environment, through which they’ve developed into mature and responsible community members, gives me and our team of leaders, deep satisfaction. One of our members even qualified as a cricket coach and has now has his own business providing training sessions to schools and holiday clubs. Whixley CC has continued to thrive due to the enthusiasm and commitment of its members. We are bound together in sustaining a thriving community that contributes to everyone’s wellbeing. I think this is worth valuing, supporting, and working for.” Learn more about Whixley CC on their Localgiving page
    Apr 03, 2014 1183
  • 22 Apr 2014
    Before the charity began in 1995, bereaved children were being referred to mental health services for support unnecessarily. Penhaligon’s Friends started running groups, memory days and offering advice to parents and carers and is the only children’s bereavement charity within Cornwall. Without them, the responsibility would fall on health, education and social care whose services are already stretched. Over the years their services have grown to offer support through groups, 1-1 and schools, helping 596 children and young people last year. “We offer support at no cost to our families and offer transport to make it accessible to all.” Hoping to raise the full £2,000 of matched funding available in the Charity Begins in Cornwall campaign, Julie Parker, manager of Penhaligon’s Friends explains how they would use the money. “We would use the funds to continue to support our children, young people and families ensuring there isn’t a delay in our services. The support that we offer can make a significant difference to the way a child manages their grief.” Peter's story “We were able to support Peter, age 11, when his mum and sister were killed in a car crash, he was also a passenger in the car. Peter broke both his legs in the crash. Peter had some family and 1-1 support in the early days to help him come to terms with the loss, and then a few years later was able to come to a memory day with his Dad. He went on to attend our teens support group and he is now a 17 year old young man, with an apprenticeship in a local garage. Peter and his Dad wanted to acknowledge the support we had offered them and completed a local sponsored walk to raise over £1000 for us. Peter was then selected to take part in BBC Children in Need’s Rickshaw Challenge in November 2013, cycling 500 miles!” One of the biggest challenges the charity faces is raising awareness of their cause. Through the Localgiving.com campaign, Penhaligon’s Friends are hoping to create bigger profile for themselves as the only charity of its kind in Cornwall and raise money which goes directly to those it is intended for. “We provide local support throughout the whole of the county and our services are mainly led by trained volunteers. Our employed staff are funded through grants so any donations go directly to supporting bereaved Cornish families.” For more information about Penhaligon’s Friends, please go to their Localgiving webpage.
    812 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Before the charity began in 1995, bereaved children were being referred to mental health services for support unnecessarily. Penhaligon’s Friends started running groups, memory days and offering advice to parents and carers and is the only children’s bereavement charity within Cornwall. Without them, the responsibility would fall on health, education and social care whose services are already stretched. Over the years their services have grown to offer support through groups, 1-1 and schools, helping 596 children and young people last year. “We offer support at no cost to our families and offer transport to make it accessible to all.” Hoping to raise the full £2,000 of matched funding available in the Charity Begins in Cornwall campaign, Julie Parker, manager of Penhaligon’s Friends explains how they would use the money. “We would use the funds to continue to support our children, young people and families ensuring there isn’t a delay in our services. The support that we offer can make a significant difference to the way a child manages their grief.” Peter's story “We were able to support Peter, age 11, when his mum and sister were killed in a car crash, he was also a passenger in the car. Peter broke both his legs in the crash. Peter had some family and 1-1 support in the early days to help him come to terms with the loss, and then a few years later was able to come to a memory day with his Dad. He went on to attend our teens support group and he is now a 17 year old young man, with an apprenticeship in a local garage. Peter and his Dad wanted to acknowledge the support we had offered them and completed a local sponsored walk to raise over £1000 for us. Peter was then selected to take part in BBC Children in Need’s Rickshaw Challenge in November 2013, cycling 500 miles!” One of the biggest challenges the charity faces is raising awareness of their cause. Through the Localgiving.com campaign, Penhaligon’s Friends are hoping to create bigger profile for themselves as the only charity of its kind in Cornwall and raise money which goes directly to those it is intended for. “We provide local support throughout the whole of the county and our services are mainly led by trained volunteers. Our employed staff are funded through grants so any donations go directly to supporting bereaved Cornish families.” For more information about Penhaligon’s Friends, please go to their Localgiving webpage.
    Apr 22, 2014 812
  • 02 Jun 2015
    Today is World Environmental Day - a day for encouraging awareness and action for the enviroment. Sadly, people are consuming more resources than the planet can provide meaning before long we would need three planet Earth's to sustain the way we live. Even small changes in your community can have a large effect in reducing the threat of climate change on the World. Last year we spoke to community group Sustainable Hayfield, whose objective is to increase awareness of climate change issues in their local area. They kindly shared some everyday tips to help communities cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% before 2050, which is the UK government’s target. The tips are easily and cheaply executed in the home and also in an office – which will help you reduce your bills and your carbon footprint at the same time. Cath Moss, the groups manager explains, “We live in a lovely part of a fascinating planet, but we use too many resources. Change is inevitable, and the sooner we act the more choice we will have to shape our own future and lower the burden of change forced upon our children. Everybody can do their bit to help make a positive impact” 30% of our emissions result from heating and lighting in our homes Poorly insulated roofs and walls can account for 60% of heat loss in houses. Most households can get their lofts properly insulated for free by their energy provider. Fix radiator reflectors behind each radiator and add thermostatic valves – unobtrusive and cheap. Draughts account for 12% of all heat loss from dwellings. Draught excluders cost very little but are effective. Considering solar panels? A good source of advice is www.energysavingtrust.org.uk 40% of our emissions are generated by food production methods Avoid air-freighted products where possible. A tonne of Middle Eastern strawberries transported by air will account for 300 times more CO2 emissions than locally grown, seasonal strawberries, which also taste much better. Consider the balance in your diet between meat and non-meat foods. Animal foods are very energy intensive to produce, fruit and vegetables much less so. Reducing the proportion of meat/fish in your diet could reduce your food carbon footprint by up to 40%. Ensure you do not waste – or let your children waste – good food. Currently, over half the uneaten food disposed of by households is perfectly edible. Save waste/money by looking at 2 week menus, recipes, portion plans and more at Love Food Hate Waste (www.lovefoodhatewaste.com). Make your own lunch for work instead of buying over packaged food. Suggest introducing a ‘Bring your own lunch day’ to help get others involved. Growing your own fruit and vegetable reduces all the energy and waste which normally goes into commercially grown food Buy a couple of point-of-lay chickens (£4-£5 each). They need very little space, very low maintenance, and will happily feed on the food waste of an average family, supplemented by a bit of scatter corn. Do you have a garden shed which is not used very often? Cover up the window(s) and grow mushrooms where they won’t interfere with storage.   Want to learn more about what you can do to lower your carbon footprint? Visit Sustainable Hayfield’s Localgiving page.
    1303 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Today is World Environmental Day - a day for encouraging awareness and action for the enviroment. Sadly, people are consuming more resources than the planet can provide meaning before long we would need three planet Earth's to sustain the way we live. Even small changes in your community can have a large effect in reducing the threat of climate change on the World. Last year we spoke to community group Sustainable Hayfield, whose objective is to increase awareness of climate change issues in their local area. They kindly shared some everyday tips to help communities cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% before 2050, which is the UK government’s target. The tips are easily and cheaply executed in the home and also in an office – which will help you reduce your bills and your carbon footprint at the same time. Cath Moss, the groups manager explains, “We live in a lovely part of a fascinating planet, but we use too many resources. Change is inevitable, and the sooner we act the more choice we will have to shape our own future and lower the burden of change forced upon our children. Everybody can do their bit to help make a positive impact” 30% of our emissions result from heating and lighting in our homes Poorly insulated roofs and walls can account for 60% of heat loss in houses. Most households can get their lofts properly insulated for free by their energy provider. Fix radiator reflectors behind each radiator and add thermostatic valves – unobtrusive and cheap. Draughts account for 12% of all heat loss from dwellings. Draught excluders cost very little but are effective. Considering solar panels? A good source of advice is www.energysavingtrust.org.uk 40% of our emissions are generated by food production methods Avoid air-freighted products where possible. A tonne of Middle Eastern strawberries transported by air will account for 300 times more CO2 emissions than locally grown, seasonal strawberries, which also taste much better. Consider the balance in your diet between meat and non-meat foods. Animal foods are very energy intensive to produce, fruit and vegetables much less so. Reducing the proportion of meat/fish in your diet could reduce your food carbon footprint by up to 40%. Ensure you do not waste – or let your children waste – good food. Currently, over half the uneaten food disposed of by households is perfectly edible. Save waste/money by looking at 2 week menus, recipes, portion plans and more at Love Food Hate Waste (www.lovefoodhatewaste.com). Make your own lunch for work instead of buying over packaged food. Suggest introducing a ‘Bring your own lunch day’ to help get others involved. Growing your own fruit and vegetable reduces all the energy and waste which normally goes into commercially grown food Buy a couple of point-of-lay chickens (£4-£5 each). They need very little space, very low maintenance, and will happily feed on the food waste of an average family, supplemented by a bit of scatter corn. Do you have a garden shed which is not used very often? Cover up the window(s) and grow mushrooms where they won’t interfere with storage.   Want to learn more about what you can do to lower your carbon footprint? Visit Sustainable Hayfield’s Localgiving page.
    Jun 02, 2015 1303
  • 29 Apr 2014
    This month our 'Cause of the Month' has been climate change and we’ve asked our environmental groups how they reduce their carbon footprint and raise environmental awareness. More Trees for BANES have shared with us their Tree Adoption Agency which is a great scheme to encourage planting thousands of trees across Bath and North East Somerset. Their work is funded by public donations and small grants and they rely solely on the generosity of their volunteers. The idea for the project came to Adam, a member of the group when he was home gardening. “I kept finding hazel saplings popping up in inappropriate places - no doubt left there by a squirrel that either has a memory issue, or perhaps has met it’s maker. I popped them all in pots, knowing that I’d be able to find them a home through More Trees BANES.” Adam soon realised that this would have been happening in gardens across the region, so began encouraging others to do the same. People can collect any unwanted saplings in pots, and drop them in Adam’s front garden or have the volunteers come and dig them up. Amidst increased awareness of climate change and how to tackle it, this project proves vital as trees absorb carbon dioxide and contribute to the slowing down of this process. Deforestation has contributed greatly to climate change in the releasing of CO2. Would you like to help their cause? The group are looking for mainly native varieties or trees and Beech; unfortunately, they cannot currently accept Ash or Sycamore. So if you live in BANES and have unwanted saplings, or would be interested in giving one a home, please get in touch with the group. They are currently raising money to set up a modest tree nursery to grow more trees from seeds. Visit their Localgiving page here to read more about what they do and how to get in touch.
    834 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • This month our 'Cause of the Month' has been climate change and we’ve asked our environmental groups how they reduce their carbon footprint and raise environmental awareness. More Trees for BANES have shared with us their Tree Adoption Agency which is a great scheme to encourage planting thousands of trees across Bath and North East Somerset. Their work is funded by public donations and small grants and they rely solely on the generosity of their volunteers. The idea for the project came to Adam, a member of the group when he was home gardening. “I kept finding hazel saplings popping up in inappropriate places - no doubt left there by a squirrel that either has a memory issue, or perhaps has met it’s maker. I popped them all in pots, knowing that I’d be able to find them a home through More Trees BANES.” Adam soon realised that this would have been happening in gardens across the region, so began encouraging others to do the same. People can collect any unwanted saplings in pots, and drop them in Adam’s front garden or have the volunteers come and dig them up. Amidst increased awareness of climate change and how to tackle it, this project proves vital as trees absorb carbon dioxide and contribute to the slowing down of this process. Deforestation has contributed greatly to climate change in the releasing of CO2. Would you like to help their cause? The group are looking for mainly native varieties or trees and Beech; unfortunately, they cannot currently accept Ash or Sycamore. So if you live in BANES and have unwanted saplings, or would be interested in giving one a home, please get in touch with the group. They are currently raising money to set up a modest tree nursery to grow more trees from seeds. Visit their Localgiving page here to read more about what they do and how to get in touch.
    Apr 29, 2014 834