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  • 03 Aug 2015
    Our members consistently tell us that lack of time and resource is a major barrier to fundraising, as the provision of core services and other aspects involved in running a charity take priority. This is a feeling that is also felt by other small charities in the sector, as reported in The FSI’s ‘UK Small Charity Sector Skills Survey’ last month. Our aim is to help members engage with fundraising in a way that doesn’t detract from the important services they deliver to their communities. In order to do this, we have developed a calendar of ready-made fundraising campaigns, designed to provide an easy way for even the smallest organisations to start building connections with supporters and raising money. We’re happy to say that many groups have reported success through engaging with our campaigns in this way. However, there are some groups that have taken things to the next level, building upon the concept of a campaign to make it their own  – with inspiring results. To explain further what I mean, I’m going to use an example from our recent campaign, #LocalHero, and the activities of a community group in Wiltshire, HEALS of Malmesbury, with the help of Alison Cross-Jones, the group's volunteer general manager. The campaign - #LocalHero We wanted to run a new style of campaign which would benefit our members and incentivise giving in a new way. The concept of “fundraisers competing for prizes” was something we hadn’t tried before, but we felt it had the potential to appeal to all our users, as well as the wider public. For supporters who wanted to fundraise, it would be a compelling opportunity to  provide extra support to a local cause. Charity and community group members would benefit from the money and awareness raised and the campaign would provide a  platform for us to deliver advice about how to secure and support fundraisers – a vital income channel for many charities. The group - HEALS of Malmesbury HEALS of Malmesbury is a community group dedicated to helping local people. As a community organisation (not a registered charity), they have been unable to make use of other online fundraising tools – making engaging with fundraisers difficult. #LocalHero appealed to the group because they felt the ethos resonated with their own mission. “We saw the #LocalHero campaign as a great way of inspiring and enabling people in the community to do brave things, to help us help each other is the spirit of the #LocalHero campaign and our group.” The group organised a skydive and asked their supporters to sign up - committing to raising a minimum of £350 to ensure costs were covered and a 50% donation level achieved. 13 people signed up, including 3 volunteer firefighters from the local fire station (“Real life heroes” as Alison referred to them), a Town Councillor, plus more doing other fundraising events. The group heavily promoted each hero through their social media accounts and encouraged the "Heroes" to do the same. This created a buzz giving the local press something to write about, while also opening the campaign to a wider audience. “There is a real mix of people and it’s great that the communities of Malmesbury and the surrounding villages have come out to support us. Through this campaign we’ve already had more people wanting to fundraise for us. The ability to have a fundraising page through Localgiving and the additional materials offered, will go a long way in helping us in the future.” “We’re encouraging them to tell their stories and in doing so they are helping us to tell ours. We’ve designed posters and leaflets, we’ve used lots of the resources available from Localgiving. The local press have covered various aspects of the campaign, which has meant a number of press releases.” To support their fundraisers, the group set up a page on their website showcasing each #LocalHero and directing sponsors to their pages. Click below to see it.  Although our #LocalHero campaign only included online donations, HEALS of Malmesbury didn’t have the same conditions. After publicity from the press, they contacted local businesses, too - 40 of which pledged to either make a donation or have a collection pot. The group ran a Quiz Night and the three firefighters taking part in the skydive also organised two charity car washes. These initiatives enabled everyone in the community to take part in the fundraising initiative – not just those interested in throwing themselves out of a plane! The group set themselves a target of £3,000 and have almost doubled that, raising over an incredible £5,000 in total! HEALS run a high street drop-in support, advice and information centre (run by volunteers) which costs £7,500 a year to run, plus a programme of events and support making their annual budget over £19,000. The success of this campaign will be able to fund the centre for the rest of 2015 and covered more than 25% of the total cost. It has also helped the group build a wider supporter base to ensure its future funding. “Sustaining our centre is key to our work because this is the main way we engage with people.” Use the fundraising calendar and do the same! What we love about the HEALS of Malmesbury is that it built a campaign on top of ours. They used our materials and platform as a stepping stone to reach their own fundraising objectives - and it’s definitely paid off! Firstly, they recognised an avenue they hadn’t yet explored with their supporters and wanted to give it a try. Secondly, they piggy-backed on a campaign we laid out for them, maximising the press opportunities and gaining support from their local community. And finally, they helped to promote the fundraisers taking part, ensuring the campaign was a success! We’ve just released a fundraising calendar which gives dates and details of the next three campaigns we’re running. If you’re inspired by HEALS of Malmesbury, why not check it out and see whether you can create a plan to build more connections with supporters and reach your targets too! Click here to see details of upcoming campaigns on our fundraising calendar!      
    1776 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Our members consistently tell us that lack of time and resource is a major barrier to fundraising, as the provision of core services and other aspects involved in running a charity take priority. This is a feeling that is also felt by other small charities in the sector, as reported in The FSI’s ‘UK Small Charity Sector Skills Survey’ last month. Our aim is to help members engage with fundraising in a way that doesn’t detract from the important services they deliver to their communities. In order to do this, we have developed a calendar of ready-made fundraising campaigns, designed to provide an easy way for even the smallest organisations to start building connections with supporters and raising money. We’re happy to say that many groups have reported success through engaging with our campaigns in this way. However, there are some groups that have taken things to the next level, building upon the concept of a campaign to make it their own  – with inspiring results. To explain further what I mean, I’m going to use an example from our recent campaign, #LocalHero, and the activities of a community group in Wiltshire, HEALS of Malmesbury, with the help of Alison Cross-Jones, the group's volunteer general manager. The campaign - #LocalHero We wanted to run a new style of campaign which would benefit our members and incentivise giving in a new way. The concept of “fundraisers competing for prizes” was something we hadn’t tried before, but we felt it had the potential to appeal to all our users, as well as the wider public. For supporters who wanted to fundraise, it would be a compelling opportunity to  provide extra support to a local cause. Charity and community group members would benefit from the money and awareness raised and the campaign would provide a  platform for us to deliver advice about how to secure and support fundraisers – a vital income channel for many charities. The group - HEALS of Malmesbury HEALS of Malmesbury is a community group dedicated to helping local people. As a community organisation (not a registered charity), they have been unable to make use of other online fundraising tools – making engaging with fundraisers difficult. #LocalHero appealed to the group because they felt the ethos resonated with their own mission. “We saw the #LocalHero campaign as a great way of inspiring and enabling people in the community to do brave things, to help us help each other is the spirit of the #LocalHero campaign and our group.” The group organised a skydive and asked their supporters to sign up - committing to raising a minimum of £350 to ensure costs were covered and a 50% donation level achieved. 13 people signed up, including 3 volunteer firefighters from the local fire station (“Real life heroes” as Alison referred to them), a Town Councillor, plus more doing other fundraising events. The group heavily promoted each hero through their social media accounts and encouraged the "Heroes" to do the same. This created a buzz giving the local press something to write about, while also opening the campaign to a wider audience. “There is a real mix of people and it’s great that the communities of Malmesbury and the surrounding villages have come out to support us. Through this campaign we’ve already had more people wanting to fundraise for us. The ability to have a fundraising page through Localgiving and the additional materials offered, will go a long way in helping us in the future.” “We’re encouraging them to tell their stories and in doing so they are helping us to tell ours. We’ve designed posters and leaflets, we’ve used lots of the resources available from Localgiving. The local press have covered various aspects of the campaign, which has meant a number of press releases.” To support their fundraisers, the group set up a page on their website showcasing each #LocalHero and directing sponsors to their pages. Click below to see it.  Although our #LocalHero campaign only included online donations, HEALS of Malmesbury didn’t have the same conditions. After publicity from the press, they contacted local businesses, too - 40 of which pledged to either make a donation or have a collection pot. The group ran a Quiz Night and the three firefighters taking part in the skydive also organised two charity car washes. These initiatives enabled everyone in the community to take part in the fundraising initiative – not just those interested in throwing themselves out of a plane! The group set themselves a target of £3,000 and have almost doubled that, raising over an incredible £5,000 in total! HEALS run a high street drop-in support, advice and information centre (run by volunteers) which costs £7,500 a year to run, plus a programme of events and support making their annual budget over £19,000. The success of this campaign will be able to fund the centre for the rest of 2015 and covered more than 25% of the total cost. It has also helped the group build a wider supporter base to ensure its future funding. “Sustaining our centre is key to our work because this is the main way we engage with people.” Use the fundraising calendar and do the same! What we love about the HEALS of Malmesbury is that it built a campaign on top of ours. They used our materials and platform as a stepping stone to reach their own fundraising objectives - and it’s definitely paid off! Firstly, they recognised an avenue they hadn’t yet explored with their supporters and wanted to give it a try. Secondly, they piggy-backed on a campaign we laid out for them, maximising the press opportunities and gaining support from their local community. And finally, they helped to promote the fundraisers taking part, ensuring the campaign was a success! We’ve just released a fundraising calendar which gives dates and details of the next three campaigns we’re running. If you’re inspired by HEALS of Malmesbury, why not check it out and see whether you can create a plan to build more connections with supporters and reach your targets too! Click here to see details of upcoming campaigns on our fundraising calendar!      
    Aug 03, 2015 1776
  • 06 Jul 2015
    In June Localgiving ran the #LocalHero campaign which saw 268 people fundraise on behalf of a local charity, raising a total of £80,499.05 in donations, prizes and Gift Aid from over 2,576 donors throughout the month. It is clear that online fundraising can be lucrative for small and local charities and it is important for these charities to be proactive about engaging with online fundraising throughout the year. As part of Small Charity Week, I hosted a webinar on ‘Inspiring Online Fundraisers’, which focused on how best to engage with and where to find fundraisers, as well as how to support them in the long-term.  Please click here for the slides. Below is a quick summary of presentation content.  Why online fundraising? This section focuses on the statistics behind online donations and fundraising and why it’s so crucial that charities make the most of this profitable revenue stream. Where can I find online fundraisers? This section covers how to find potential fundraisers both offline and online, including advice for making the most of social media tools and how to properly interact with your pre-existing supporters. How do I inspire online fundraisers? The key focus on the presentation, this section includes advice on how to make an inspiring appeal, evidence the impact of your work as well as some useful examples of groups who have done these things successfully; you can also read our blog post  for more information on this topic in our blog Follow These 6 Easy Steps & Find Your Next Fundraiser.  How do I support my fundraisers? Maintaining a relationship with your fundraiser once they have agreed to fundraise for you is a crucial part of the process. This section covers advice on how to successfully support your fundraisers and make them feel appreciated; you can also find more on this topic in our blog Support Your Fundraisers With These 6 Quick Tips.  How do I keep my fundraisers engaged? This section details how to turn your fundraisers into long-terms supporters and what that can mean for your charity in the long term. For more information on this topic have a look at our blog on How To Turn Your Latest Fundraiser Into A Supporter For Life.  Remember, if you need any help with your fundraising through Localgiving, you can contact us for free from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Monday - Friday on 0300 111 2340 or via help@localgiving.com and one of our team of qualified fundraisers will be happy to provide advice and support! 
    1531 Posted by Fergus Simpson
  • In June Localgiving ran the #LocalHero campaign which saw 268 people fundraise on behalf of a local charity, raising a total of £80,499.05 in donations, prizes and Gift Aid from over 2,576 donors throughout the month. It is clear that online fundraising can be lucrative for small and local charities and it is important for these charities to be proactive about engaging with online fundraising throughout the year. As part of Small Charity Week, I hosted a webinar on ‘Inspiring Online Fundraisers’, which focused on how best to engage with and where to find fundraisers, as well as how to support them in the long-term.  Please click here for the slides. Below is a quick summary of presentation content.  Why online fundraising? This section focuses on the statistics behind online donations and fundraising and why it’s so crucial that charities make the most of this profitable revenue stream. Where can I find online fundraisers? This section covers how to find potential fundraisers both offline and online, including advice for making the most of social media tools and how to properly interact with your pre-existing supporters. How do I inspire online fundraisers? The key focus on the presentation, this section includes advice on how to make an inspiring appeal, evidence the impact of your work as well as some useful examples of groups who have done these things successfully; you can also read our blog post  for more information on this topic in our blog Follow These 6 Easy Steps & Find Your Next Fundraiser.  How do I support my fundraisers? Maintaining a relationship with your fundraiser once they have agreed to fundraise for you is a crucial part of the process. This section covers advice on how to successfully support your fundraisers and make them feel appreciated; you can also find more on this topic in our blog Support Your Fundraisers With These 6 Quick Tips.  How do I keep my fundraisers engaged? This section details how to turn your fundraisers into long-terms supporters and what that can mean for your charity in the long term. For more information on this topic have a look at our blog on How To Turn Your Latest Fundraiser Into A Supporter For Life.  Remember, if you need any help with your fundraising through Localgiving, you can contact us for free from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Monday - Friday on 0300 111 2340 or via help@localgiving.com and one of our team of qualified fundraisers will be happy to provide advice and support! 
    Jul 06, 2015 1531
  • 24 Jun 2015
    How you interact with your fundraiser once their event is over is crucial when it comes to converting them into a long-term supporter. In this blog we will be looking at 4 simple ways to keep your fundraisers engaged in your charity and your cause. 1. Publicly thank them for their support Use social media, emails or a newsletter to publicly thank your fundraiser for their efforts. Let everyone know how much they raised, what they did to raise it and, crucially, how much it means to your charity.  Thanking your fundraiser publicly also gives them a chance to share your message of appreciation with their personal networks, creating extra publicity for your charity and potentially inspiring a whole new group of people to fundraise for you in the future. 2. Invite them to visit you in person A great way to build a relationship with your fundraiser is to invite them to a team meeting or event and thank them face-to-face for their efforts. If possible, introduce your fundraisers to beneficiaries to remind them what their funds will be going towards and how people's lives will be positively affected. Read about how one group, York Carers, did just that for their fundraiser, Tony Ives.  3. Keep them up to date with your progress If your fundraiser was raising money for a particular project then send them updates of how it is going. Including images and testimonials from people the project has helped can be a great way of adding meaning to these updates. If you are sharing this information publicly then make sure you acknowledge which fundraiser(s) made it possible. Thanking your fundraisers in this way lets them know their efforts where worthwhile and could be the first step in turning them into a long term advocate for your cause.  4. Don’t forget to thank your donors too!  We all know that with each new donor comes the opportunity to raise further funds for your group, so make sure you thank them as well. Make a note on your database of which donors came from which fundraisers, as this will help you to better personalise your communications and provide an indication of what kind of fundraising event may appeal to them in the future.  The focus of these tips is to make sure your fundraiser feels appreciated, that their efforts have made a difference and crucially that they are a helpful part of your cause. By doing this you are much more likely to fundraise for you again and hopefully encourage their friends and family to do the same! Further Information If you are still looking for fundraisers or want to know how to support them while they fundraise for you them during then check out our previous blogs or contact us at help@localgiving.com  You can also click here to download this poster   
    1483 Posted by Fergus Simpson
  • How you interact with your fundraiser once their event is over is crucial when it comes to converting them into a long-term supporter. In this blog we will be looking at 4 simple ways to keep your fundraisers engaged in your charity and your cause. 1. Publicly thank them for their support Use social media, emails or a newsletter to publicly thank your fundraiser for their efforts. Let everyone know how much they raised, what they did to raise it and, crucially, how much it means to your charity.  Thanking your fundraiser publicly also gives them a chance to share your message of appreciation with their personal networks, creating extra publicity for your charity and potentially inspiring a whole new group of people to fundraise for you in the future. 2. Invite them to visit you in person A great way to build a relationship with your fundraiser is to invite them to a team meeting or event and thank them face-to-face for their efforts. If possible, introduce your fundraisers to beneficiaries to remind them what their funds will be going towards and how people's lives will be positively affected. Read about how one group, York Carers, did just that for their fundraiser, Tony Ives.  3. Keep them up to date with your progress If your fundraiser was raising money for a particular project then send them updates of how it is going. Including images and testimonials from people the project has helped can be a great way of adding meaning to these updates. If you are sharing this information publicly then make sure you acknowledge which fundraiser(s) made it possible. Thanking your fundraisers in this way lets them know their efforts where worthwhile and could be the first step in turning them into a long term advocate for your cause.  4. Don’t forget to thank your donors too!  We all know that with each new donor comes the opportunity to raise further funds for your group, so make sure you thank them as well. Make a note on your database of which donors came from which fundraisers, as this will help you to better personalise your communications and provide an indication of what kind of fundraising event may appeal to them in the future.  The focus of these tips is to make sure your fundraiser feels appreciated, that their efforts have made a difference and crucially that they are a helpful part of your cause. By doing this you are much more likely to fundraise for you again and hopefully encourage their friends and family to do the same! Further Information If you are still looking for fundraisers or want to know how to support them while they fundraise for you them during then check out our previous blogs or contact us at help@localgiving.com  You can also click here to download this poster   
    Jun 24, 2015 1483
  • 19 Aug 2015
    Thinking of what you can do to fundraise for charity can sometimes be harder than the challenge itself! To help get those ideas flowing we've created an A - Z of fun activities you can do that'll be sure to get your friends and family to support you and your chosen charity. Think outside the box Running a marathon is an amazing achievement, but if running isn't for you there are loads of other ways you can raise money for a local charity. On Localgiving we've had all sorts of wacky ideas including eating 3 whole chickens in an hour and sitting in a baked bean bath while having your head shaved plus some creative ideas such as a vote on which songs a choir will sing at an event. Think local! Once you've come up with your idea all that's left is finding an amazing local charity or community group to fundraise for - and that's where we come in. We've got thousands of local voluntary groups that would love your support! Find one in your area by simply entering your postcode into our search and scrolling through the groups closest to you.                       
    7111 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Thinking of what you can do to fundraise for charity can sometimes be harder than the challenge itself! To help get those ideas flowing we've created an A - Z of fun activities you can do that'll be sure to get your friends and family to support you and your chosen charity. Think outside the box Running a marathon is an amazing achievement, but if running isn't for you there are loads of other ways you can raise money for a local charity. On Localgiving we've had all sorts of wacky ideas including eating 3 whole chickens in an hour and sitting in a baked bean bath while having your head shaved plus some creative ideas such as a vote on which songs a choir will sing at an event. Think local! Once you've come up with your idea all that's left is finding an amazing local charity or community group to fundraise for - and that's where we come in. We've got thousands of local voluntary groups that would love your support! Find one in your area by simply entering your postcode into our search and scrolling through the groups closest to you.                       
    Aug 19, 2015 7111
  • 09 Jun 2015
    Finding supporters to fundraise for your charity is a brilliant way to increase donations and promote your cause. Knowing how to find these fundraisers is a crucial skill for any charity (see Follow These 6 Easy Steps & Find Your Next Fundraiser) but it is equally important to know how to to properly support them once they've decided to raise money for you.  By supporting your fundraisers you can motivate them to raise more money, better promote your charity and, crucially, create a lasting relastionship and a long-term supporter. Here are 6 quick tips to help you do just that:      1. Thank them immediately Help your fundraisers to feel supported and motivated by thanking them as soon as they set up their fundraising page. Send them an email to show your appreciation and make them feel part of a team, while also reminding them how much you appreciate their efforts. When thanking fundraisers make sure you reiterate what their support will mean to your charity, ideally with specific examples of what the money they raise will go towards; images would also be a great addition. These "thank yous" will help them to visualise their goal and hopefully motivate them to raise even more!      2. Help promote their page Add the unique Localgiving URL for your fundraiser's page to your website, email signature, social media and other promotional materials. This helps to support them while also encoruaging new donations and showing potential supporters that you have a relationship with your fundraisers. Creating a public, as well as a personal, narrative between you and your fundraisers is they key way to show your support as well as encourage donations.      3. Create a sense of community If you have more than one fundraiser, then put them in touch with one another. For example, if two people are running the same fun run or marathon they may be interested in training together and supporting one another. Similarly, you can invite them to meet the people who will benefit from the money they raise - this will help to inspire and motivate them. When it comes to fundraising, people often respond better to group activities. By bringing your fundraisers together you can inspire a sense of solidarity for your cause - this is also more likely to encourage your fundraisers to get their friends and families involved, creating more fundraisers and ultimately more donations for your charity!       4. Make them feel special Publicly celebrate their milestones on social media and personally celebrate them via email. Milestones may include their first donation or a quarter of a way to their fundraising total. By doing this they will not only be aware of your appreciation but will have something to share with their personal networks; motivating those friends and family members to give and develop a greater awareness of your cause. Similarly, personalise your support: if they are running a marathon or doing a bike race then send them specific tips or advice related to their event. This type of advice is easily accessible online. Finding relevant information and sending it to your fundraiser shows you’ve gone the extra mile to build that relationship.  5. Ask them for feedback Ensure your relationship with your fundraisers is a dialogue. What would help them with their training or further inspire them to fundraise? Have their networks of friends and families given any feedback about their fundraising efforts or your cause? This shows you are interested in their progress and, importantly, will also help you to better personalise your appeals to supporters in future.    6. Highlight their story Feature their story on your website, your newsletter or social media outlets. Encourage them to send their unique story e.g why they're fundraising for you; they could even set up a personal blog to update people on their progress. Also follow them on social media so you can stay up to date with their progress and ensure they have everything they need such as charity information/branded materials.    Building meaningful relationships with your fundraisers is key to generating longer-term support. By showing how much you appreciate them you can instil a sense of pride in what they are doing and ensure that they feel their contribution is making a real positive difference. We hope these quick tips help you to ensure your fundraisers feel fully supported. With a little luck, they might fundraise for you again in the future and even encourage their friends and families to do so too!   Further information and material        If you want to learn more about supporting your fundraisers, as well as a range of tips on how to make the most of online fundraising, then click here to find slides from our 'Inspiring Online Fundraisers' webinar that we hosted during Small Charities Week.  Click here to download the poster                      
    1791 Posted by Fergus Simpson
  • Finding supporters to fundraise for your charity is a brilliant way to increase donations and promote your cause. Knowing how to find these fundraisers is a crucial skill for any charity (see Follow These 6 Easy Steps & Find Your Next Fundraiser) but it is equally important to know how to to properly support them once they've decided to raise money for you.  By supporting your fundraisers you can motivate them to raise more money, better promote your charity and, crucially, create a lasting relastionship and a long-term supporter. Here are 6 quick tips to help you do just that:      1. Thank them immediately Help your fundraisers to feel supported and motivated by thanking them as soon as they set up their fundraising page. Send them an email to show your appreciation and make them feel part of a team, while also reminding them how much you appreciate their efforts. When thanking fundraisers make sure you reiterate what their support will mean to your charity, ideally with specific examples of what the money they raise will go towards; images would also be a great addition. These "thank yous" will help them to visualise their goal and hopefully motivate them to raise even more!      2. Help promote their page Add the unique Localgiving URL for your fundraiser's page to your website, email signature, social media and other promotional materials. This helps to support them while also encoruaging new donations and showing potential supporters that you have a relationship with your fundraisers. Creating a public, as well as a personal, narrative between you and your fundraisers is they key way to show your support as well as encourage donations.      3. Create a sense of community If you have more than one fundraiser, then put them in touch with one another. For example, if two people are running the same fun run or marathon they may be interested in training together and supporting one another. Similarly, you can invite them to meet the people who will benefit from the money they raise - this will help to inspire and motivate them. When it comes to fundraising, people often respond better to group activities. By bringing your fundraisers together you can inspire a sense of solidarity for your cause - this is also more likely to encourage your fundraisers to get their friends and families involved, creating more fundraisers and ultimately more donations for your charity!       4. Make them feel special Publicly celebrate their milestones on social media and personally celebrate them via email. Milestones may include their first donation or a quarter of a way to their fundraising total. By doing this they will not only be aware of your appreciation but will have something to share with their personal networks; motivating those friends and family members to give and develop a greater awareness of your cause. Similarly, personalise your support: if they are running a marathon or doing a bike race then send them specific tips or advice related to their event. This type of advice is easily accessible online. Finding relevant information and sending it to your fundraiser shows you’ve gone the extra mile to build that relationship.  5. Ask them for feedback Ensure your relationship with your fundraisers is a dialogue. What would help them with their training or further inspire them to fundraise? Have their networks of friends and families given any feedback about their fundraising efforts or your cause? This shows you are interested in their progress and, importantly, will also help you to better personalise your appeals to supporters in future.    6. Highlight their story Feature their story on your website, your newsletter or social media outlets. Encourage them to send their unique story e.g why they're fundraising for you; they could even set up a personal blog to update people on their progress. Also follow them on social media so you can stay up to date with their progress and ensure they have everything they need such as charity information/branded materials.    Building meaningful relationships with your fundraisers is key to generating longer-term support. By showing how much you appreciate them you can instil a sense of pride in what they are doing and ensure that they feel their contribution is making a real positive difference. We hope these quick tips help you to ensure your fundraisers feel fully supported. With a little luck, they might fundraise for you again in the future and even encourage their friends and families to do so too!   Further information and material        If you want to learn more about supporting your fundraisers, as well as a range of tips on how to make the most of online fundraising, then click here to find slides from our 'Inspiring Online Fundraisers' webinar that we hosted during Small Charities Week.  Click here to download the poster                      
    Jun 09, 2015 1791
  • 03 Jun 2015
    We all know that individual fundraisers raise lots of money for charities, but it's important to remember that they are also fantastic at spreading goodwill and encouraging support for worthy causes. Fundraisers can be of particular benefit to local charities by raising awareness amongst the community and inspiring more local people to get involved with the group's work. Each fundraising page set up through Localgiving typically attracts 10 new donors and raises an average of over £400, so following these 6 easy steps to inspire someone in your community to fundraise on your behalf is certainly worth the effort! 1. Build your story The first step towards successfully inspiring any new type of supporter is to build a strong, clear and cohesive story around your organisation. One easy trick to help you structure your story is to use the 5 W's and 1 H technique: Who, What, Why, When, Where and How.   Who: Who does your organisation help?  What: What are your objectives? What initiatives do you currently have in place? Why: Why was your organisation founded? What are the key issues that it addresses? When: When was your organisation founded? When do you deliver specific activities? Where: Where do you operate? Be specific within the local area. How: How do you meet your goals and objectives? How do you run your initiatives? Try to use the above questions to paint a compelling picture about how your group makes a difference within your community. Make it clear how things would be different if your group did not exist and try to include your passion for the work you do to inspire support from others. 2. Evidence your impact Evidencing impact is vital to show would-be fundraisers how the money they raise on your behalf will be put to good use. If someone is to put themselves through a gruelling marathon to support your work, it is critical that they understand the impact that their actions can have! One way to do this is to use real-life examples of how previous funding has been used to demonstrate the "return on investment". The key to evidencing impact effectively is to follow the story through to it's conclusion. Try to answer the following questions: How much funding did you raise? Include the total amount and how your raised it – if it was through public donations, say so, this shows that you already have people supporting you, which in turn is likely to inspire trust and support from others. What did you do with the funding? This could be a clear-cut, like buying a new tool or resource, or it could be more abstract, like going towards energy bills or rent. Either way, make sure to be clear about how the money was spent. What was the result of this for the people you help? If you were able to buy a new resource, evidence how this affected your service users – were you able to help more people? Provide better help for those that you already support? Deliver a specific event or service? If your funding went towards your core costs, evidence how the money enabled you to continue to help the people you already support. The most effective examples will use numbers and statistics to clearly show your impact.  For example, a community transport group might say the following:  In 2014 we were able to raise a total of £2,500 through individual donations and fundraisers. The money enabled us to upgrade our minibus with features to enable wheelchair users to easily access the bus. This has resulted in a 20% increase in the number of people we are able to help, meaning that an additional 30 people have been assisted to get from A to B over the past 6 months. 3. Use case studies Now that you've given clear examples of how the money you've raised in the past has been spent, using numbers and statistics to show your return on investment, it's time to connect with your supporters on a more emotional level. Case studies are an ideal way to do this. Think of a case study as a story – you can try using the 5 W's and 1 H technique described above to help you build a compelling picture of how your organisation has helped an individual or group of people in your community. Quotes and testimonials from service users can help to bring your story to life and will engage potential supporters on a human level, helping them to become invested in your work.  4. Create a connection Once you've fully explained your organisation and given real-life examples of the impact it has, it's time to tell your own story. Nothing will speak to someone as much as your own passion for the work you do. Explain your personal motivation for being involved and what your "a-ha moment" was that provided the catalyst for where you are today. This will help you to explain the real meaning of the work you do and inspire the same passion in someone else.  5. Make the ask Hopefully, by following the above steps you will have won over a whole host of new supporters! Now it's time to convert them into fundraisers to spread your message even further. People will often be invested in something but not know how to best get involved. The key is to simply make the ask! Get in touch with supporters through as many channels as possible. You can download and edit this fundraising poster to include your Localgiving URL, then print it out and stick it around your community.  Use email and social media to quickly spread the word - don't be shy! Let people know that you are looking for fundraisers and ask them to share your message with their friends and families as well. You could even approach local businesses and ask for their support – they will often be looking for team-building exercises and fundraising can be a great option! 6. Have a clear call to action Make it as easy as possible for people to get involved. Make sure you include the link to your Localgiving page in all of your communications and make it clear that you are asking people to fundraise for you. You could even go one step further and book some spaces at a local sporting event or host your own challenge and ask people to take part.  If you're unable to organise something yourself, try to provide ideas and examples of challenges that people can get involved in to raise money on your behalf. Some ideas could include setting up a birthday giving page, having a fancy dress day at the local school or even a potato eating competition at the local pub! The only limit is your imagination! Need more help or advice? We hope these 6 steps will help you to inspire more fundraisers to get involved with your organisation and raise money on your behalf. To help you remember the key steps, you can download and print out this poster. Remember, if you need any help with your fundraising through Localgiving, you can contact us for free from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Monday - Friday on 0300 111 2340 or via help@localgiving.com and one of our team of qualified fundraisers will be happy to provide advice and support! 
    2956 Posted by Lou Coady
  • We all know that individual fundraisers raise lots of money for charities, but it's important to remember that they are also fantastic at spreading goodwill and encouraging support for worthy causes. Fundraisers can be of particular benefit to local charities by raising awareness amongst the community and inspiring more local people to get involved with the group's work. Each fundraising page set up through Localgiving typically attracts 10 new donors and raises an average of over £400, so following these 6 easy steps to inspire someone in your community to fundraise on your behalf is certainly worth the effort! 1. Build your story The first step towards successfully inspiring any new type of supporter is to build a strong, clear and cohesive story around your organisation. One easy trick to help you structure your story is to use the 5 W's and 1 H technique: Who, What, Why, When, Where and How.   Who: Who does your organisation help?  What: What are your objectives? What initiatives do you currently have in place? Why: Why was your organisation founded? What are the key issues that it addresses? When: When was your organisation founded? When do you deliver specific activities? Where: Where do you operate? Be specific within the local area. How: How do you meet your goals and objectives? How do you run your initiatives? Try to use the above questions to paint a compelling picture about how your group makes a difference within your community. Make it clear how things would be different if your group did not exist and try to include your passion for the work you do to inspire support from others. 2. Evidence your impact Evidencing impact is vital to show would-be fundraisers how the money they raise on your behalf will be put to good use. If someone is to put themselves through a gruelling marathon to support your work, it is critical that they understand the impact that their actions can have! One way to do this is to use real-life examples of how previous funding has been used to demonstrate the "return on investment". The key to evidencing impact effectively is to follow the story through to it's conclusion. Try to answer the following questions: How much funding did you raise? Include the total amount and how your raised it – if it was through public donations, say so, this shows that you already have people supporting you, which in turn is likely to inspire trust and support from others. What did you do with the funding? This could be a clear-cut, like buying a new tool or resource, or it could be more abstract, like going towards energy bills or rent. Either way, make sure to be clear about how the money was spent. What was the result of this for the people you help? If you were able to buy a new resource, evidence how this affected your service users – were you able to help more people? Provide better help for those that you already support? Deliver a specific event or service? If your funding went towards your core costs, evidence how the money enabled you to continue to help the people you already support. The most effective examples will use numbers and statistics to clearly show your impact.  For example, a community transport group might say the following:  In 2014 we were able to raise a total of £2,500 through individual donations and fundraisers. The money enabled us to upgrade our minibus with features to enable wheelchair users to easily access the bus. This has resulted in a 20% increase in the number of people we are able to help, meaning that an additional 30 people have been assisted to get from A to B over the past 6 months. 3. Use case studies Now that you've given clear examples of how the money you've raised in the past has been spent, using numbers and statistics to show your return on investment, it's time to connect with your supporters on a more emotional level. Case studies are an ideal way to do this. Think of a case study as a story – you can try using the 5 W's and 1 H technique described above to help you build a compelling picture of how your organisation has helped an individual or group of people in your community. Quotes and testimonials from service users can help to bring your story to life and will engage potential supporters on a human level, helping them to become invested in your work.  4. Create a connection Once you've fully explained your organisation and given real-life examples of the impact it has, it's time to tell your own story. Nothing will speak to someone as much as your own passion for the work you do. Explain your personal motivation for being involved and what your "a-ha moment" was that provided the catalyst for where you are today. This will help you to explain the real meaning of the work you do and inspire the same passion in someone else.  5. Make the ask Hopefully, by following the above steps you will have won over a whole host of new supporters! Now it's time to convert them into fundraisers to spread your message even further. People will often be invested in something but not know how to best get involved. The key is to simply make the ask! Get in touch with supporters through as many channels as possible. You can download and edit this fundraising poster to include your Localgiving URL, then print it out and stick it around your community.  Use email and social media to quickly spread the word - don't be shy! Let people know that you are looking for fundraisers and ask them to share your message with their friends and families as well. You could even approach local businesses and ask for their support – they will often be looking for team-building exercises and fundraising can be a great option! 6. Have a clear call to action Make it as easy as possible for people to get involved. Make sure you include the link to your Localgiving page in all of your communications and make it clear that you are asking people to fundraise for you. You could even go one step further and book some spaces at a local sporting event or host your own challenge and ask people to take part.  If you're unable to organise something yourself, try to provide ideas and examples of challenges that people can get involved in to raise money on your behalf. Some ideas could include setting up a birthday giving page, having a fancy dress day at the local school or even a potato eating competition at the local pub! The only limit is your imagination! Need more help or advice? We hope these 6 steps will help you to inspire more fundraisers to get involved with your organisation and raise money on your behalf. To help you remember the key steps, you can download and print out this poster. Remember, if you need any help with your fundraising through Localgiving, you can contact us for free from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Monday - Friday on 0300 111 2340 or via help@localgiving.com and one of our team of qualified fundraisers will be happy to provide advice and support! 
    Jun 03, 2015 2956
  • 17 Mar 2014
    Following my previous post on why you should consider  running for charity, I’ve decided to share with you my top tips for preparing - from the training to the fundraising preparation.  The marathon itself is not the only journey you will undertake when you decide to run. Much preparation and commitment is involved and the journey to the start line is just as important as the race itself! Giving equal attention to the physical preparation as you do to promoting your page will help increase the chances of you completing the race and raising funds! Preparing for the marathon is great but if no one is aware of your event they won’t know how to donate! Here are a few general tips to help you on your way: Training for your marathon: First check with your doctor that you are fit enough to run. This is a huge physical challenge to undertake and shouldn’t be taken lightly! Ensure you give yourself enough time to train. If the marathon is a month away, maybe you should consider next year’s instead! Planning is key. Mark on your calendar what days you’ll train and when you will give yourself breaks. These are important to allow your body to recover from training. Keep yourself fuelled! You’ll be burning a lot of calories, make sure you’re getting enough energy. Carbs are key but getting in some protein is essential too. Do a dress rehearsal. Practise with a shorter distance a few weeks before to test your technique and running gear to see if you’ll feel comfortable. Tips to promote your fundraising event: Create your fundraising page to share your story- let people know why you’re doing it and who you’re doing it for. Use high quality images to assist you with telling your story. Promote your fundraising page to your network- family, friends, colleagues, trustees, committee members, beneficiaries, previous supporters- anyone and everyone! It doesn’t hurt to share your cause and ask for a donation. Share your page on different platforms. Social media is a great starting pointing with Facebook and Twitter as you can include your URL and direct supporters to donate. Print and local press are also avenues you should consider. The more people that see your page the better. Always take advantage of Gift Aid and match fund schemes if they are available. Circulating an email about your page just after payday can also get a bit more in! Don’t’ forget to say thank you! It’s important to engage with your sponsors right up until the event and make sure you let them know how much you appreciate their support even after it’s done. Good Luck!  
    919 Posted by Steph Heyden
  • Following my previous post on why you should consider  running for charity, I’ve decided to share with you my top tips for preparing - from the training to the fundraising preparation.  The marathon itself is not the only journey you will undertake when you decide to run. Much preparation and commitment is involved and the journey to the start line is just as important as the race itself! Giving equal attention to the physical preparation as you do to promoting your page will help increase the chances of you completing the race and raising funds! Preparing for the marathon is great but if no one is aware of your event they won’t know how to donate! Here are a few general tips to help you on your way: Training for your marathon: First check with your doctor that you are fit enough to run. This is a huge physical challenge to undertake and shouldn’t be taken lightly! Ensure you give yourself enough time to train. If the marathon is a month away, maybe you should consider next year’s instead! Planning is key. Mark on your calendar what days you’ll train and when you will give yourself breaks. These are important to allow your body to recover from training. Keep yourself fuelled! You’ll be burning a lot of calories, make sure you’re getting enough energy. Carbs are key but getting in some protein is essential too. Do a dress rehearsal. Practise with a shorter distance a few weeks before to test your technique and running gear to see if you’ll feel comfortable. Tips to promote your fundraising event: Create your fundraising page to share your story- let people know why you’re doing it and who you’re doing it for. Use high quality images to assist you with telling your story. Promote your fundraising page to your network- family, friends, colleagues, trustees, committee members, beneficiaries, previous supporters- anyone and everyone! It doesn’t hurt to share your cause and ask for a donation. Share your page on different platforms. Social media is a great starting pointing with Facebook and Twitter as you can include your URL and direct supporters to donate. Print and local press are also avenues you should consider. The more people that see your page the better. Always take advantage of Gift Aid and match fund schemes if they are available. Circulating an email about your page just after payday can also get a bit more in! Don’t’ forget to say thank you! It’s important to engage with your sponsors right up until the event and make sure you let them know how much you appreciate their support even after it’s done. Good Luck!  
    Mar 17, 2014 919