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  • 06 Oct 2017
      1. Knowledge is power Familiarise yourself with the full terms of the campaign. Once you know how everything works, plan what you’ll do to make the most of it. Remember to let everyone in the organisation know (don’t forget the trustees!) so everyone is prepared and can do their bit. Afterall, Grow Your Tenner comes but once a year! Think about how Grow Your Tenner will complement current or ongoing fundraising activities. For example, do you have a fundraiser raising money for you at the moment? If yes, encourage them to do an extra push for donations during Grow Your Tenner. You can help by sharing their fundraising page via your social media and other networks. 2. Don’t ask, don’t get Letting supporters know Grow Your Tenner is happening is just the first step. To maximise your chances of getting donations, you’ll actually have to ask! Remember to ask nicely, and to be specific - so rather than saying: “Donate £10 to us today and it will be doubled.” Try saying: “Donate £10 to our new building appeal today and it will be doubled by Localgiving! £20 is enough to buy a new chair for the community room.“ A good rule of thumb when crafting your “ask” is to focus on the donor, as opposed to your organisation. Let’s look at an example. A homeless charity might say something like: “Support our outreach work with homeless people in [town] - your £10 donation will enable us to provide a hot meal for a person in crisis.” To help the donor feel a bit more connected to the cause, and therefore a bit more likely to donate, they could instead say: “Reach out to homeless people in [town] - because of your £10, a person in crisis will be able to enjoy a hot meal today.” 3. Once upon a time Effective storytelling is key to fundraising. Stories engage us, and are much easier to remember than statistics.They also have the ability to trigger an emotional response, which helps build rapport between your cause and your supporters. Stories are most effective when they are told by the people you support, in their own words. As a charitable organisation, you touch the lives of so many people! Chances are, some of them would be delighted to “give something back” by providing a short testimonial or case study. Use these storytelling tips to help you get started! 4. Make it your own If you can add additional meaning to the campaign, it will make it more personal to your cause and more tangible for your supporters. For example, if you’re currently running an appeal, how many doubled tenners will it take for you to reach your target? Or perhaps there’s something specific that the extra £10 will enable you to do? Let’s go back to the homeless charity example: “Your gift of £10 will buy a person in crisis a hot meal, and the £10 match funding will give them a safe bed in the shelter tonight.” Finally, can you do something unique to bring the campaign to life? Belfast Print Workshop came up with this fun, share-worthy video in advance of last year’s Grow Your Tenner. 5. Is there anybody out there? Once you’ve planned your approach, it’s time to start spreading the word! Social media is a great place to start. Use any platform you are on to let people know about the campaign. Encourage your volunteers and/or staff to share posts made by your group’s page so the message reaches more people. Keep it visual, using photos and videos where possible. South Denbighshire Community Partnership recently used Facebook Live to broadcast their fundraiser, Alex, being waxed before competing in the Iron Man Wales triathlon! It was a great way to get people involved (the video got over a thousand views) and it generated more donations for Alex’s page.   As a Localgiving member, you’re part of a lively and diverse community of grassroots organisations across the UK. During the campaign, get inspiration and support each other by following #GrowYourTenner on Facebook and Twitter. Not only will you see all the great fundraising other groups are doing, you’ll also get the latest updates from Localgiving. Remember to use the hashtag in all your posts, too - we’ll share when we can! Don’t forget about your other communication channels. Have you approached the local news? You can upload a press release right from the Localgiving website! 6. Let me check my schedule Trying to stay on top of multiple social media channels can be tricky. Picture this: Grow Your Tenner starts at 10:00 on the 17th of October, and you’ve organised a special coffee morning at your local community centre to launch your fundraising appeal. You really should put some things on social media, but you’ll be busy speaking to people at the event. What a dilemma!   Enter: scheduling tools. Scheduling enables you to plan posts in advance, meaning you can be active on social media even when you’re busy doing things in the real world. Some platforms have scheduling features built in (e.g. Facebook), or you can use a dedicated service (e.g. Hootsuite) to manage multiple accounts. If you’ve never tried scheduling before, check out these handy guides: Scheduling a Facebook post Scheduling social media using Hootsuite   7. Let’s stay together Direct Debits account for 31% of all donations to UK charities. Regular donations are hugely important for small, local charities, helping them to stabilise their finances and plan for the future. A one-off donation of £120 can be daunting for many people, whereas £10 a month seems much more reasonable. A £10 monthly donation set up during the campaign will raise £210 over a 12 month period (including Gift Aid and match funding) - that’s a whopping £60 extra thanks to Grow Your Tenner! Tune in to our next webinar at 1pm on the 12th of October for some hints and tips on how to attract regular donors. 8. Mind your Ps and Qs If someone put money in your collection tin, you’d give them a friendly smile and a cheery thank you - so remember to do the same online! A timely and well-written thank you will make the donor feel appreciated. Nothing, on the other hand, might make them think twice about giving again in the future. Lots of thank yous to do? Remember you can send messages to donors directly from your Localgiving dashboard using 3 saved templates. Not sure where to start? Have a look at our guide to writing a good thank you message. If you’re feeling adventurous, try experimenting with different methods of sending thank yous - like TAPE Community Music & Film, who made this simple video after their recent appeal!   9. Don’t stop me now You’ve prepared well for the launch of Grow Your Tenner, and you get a few donations in on the the 17th. Success! Time to relax, right? Not yet! The campaign will run for as long as there is money in the pot (or until 16th of November - whichever comes first), so be sure to keep the momentum going. Because there’s a target to aim for, an appeal will help you to focus your fundraising and keep people engaged for the whole campaign. Keep posting on social media throughout Grow Your Tenner, and give updates about your fundraising. Remember to celebrate when you reach a milestone, and remind people that their donations will be matched for a limited time. Check out these 13 tips to help you run a successful appeal.   10. I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship Your interaction with a donor shouldn’t end at the point where they give - that’s only the start! Firstly, you’ll (ideally) be getting in touch within 24 hours to say thank you. From there, you could go back to them again at the end of Grow Your Tenner, to let them know how much you raised and your plans for the money. Once you’ve started using the money raised, get back in touch again with a progress update. This is your opportunity to really demonstrate the difference their money is making to the people you support. If you’re working on a capital project, could you send some before and after photos? If the money was for an event, could you send a video with snippets from the participants? Your aim should be to keep the donor interested, so you can go back to them in the future to let them know how they can get involved again - be that volunteering at an event, doing a sponsored challenge or donating to your next appeal. With these 10 tips, you should feel prepared to take on Grow Your Tenner - but remember you can call 0300 111 2340 or email help@localgiving.org for friendly help, support and fundraising advice. Good luck!  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha 
    2817 Posted by Emma Jones
  •   1. Knowledge is power Familiarise yourself with the full terms of the campaign. Once you know how everything works, plan what you’ll do to make the most of it. Remember to let everyone in the organisation know (don’t forget the trustees!) so everyone is prepared and can do their bit. Afterall, Grow Your Tenner comes but once a year! Think about how Grow Your Tenner will complement current or ongoing fundraising activities. For example, do you have a fundraiser raising money for you at the moment? If yes, encourage them to do an extra push for donations during Grow Your Tenner. You can help by sharing their fundraising page via your social media and other networks. 2. Don’t ask, don’t get Letting supporters know Grow Your Tenner is happening is just the first step. To maximise your chances of getting donations, you’ll actually have to ask! Remember to ask nicely, and to be specific - so rather than saying: “Donate £10 to us today and it will be doubled.” Try saying: “Donate £10 to our new building appeal today and it will be doubled by Localgiving! £20 is enough to buy a new chair for the community room.“ A good rule of thumb when crafting your “ask” is to focus on the donor, as opposed to your organisation. Let’s look at an example. A homeless charity might say something like: “Support our outreach work with homeless people in [town] - your £10 donation will enable us to provide a hot meal for a person in crisis.” To help the donor feel a bit more connected to the cause, and therefore a bit more likely to donate, they could instead say: “Reach out to homeless people in [town] - because of your £10, a person in crisis will be able to enjoy a hot meal today.” 3. Once upon a time Effective storytelling is key to fundraising. Stories engage us, and are much easier to remember than statistics.They also have the ability to trigger an emotional response, which helps build rapport between your cause and your supporters. Stories are most effective when they are told by the people you support, in their own words. As a charitable organisation, you touch the lives of so many people! Chances are, some of them would be delighted to “give something back” by providing a short testimonial or case study. Use these storytelling tips to help you get started! 4. Make it your own If you can add additional meaning to the campaign, it will make it more personal to your cause and more tangible for your supporters. For example, if you’re currently running an appeal, how many doubled tenners will it take for you to reach your target? Or perhaps there’s something specific that the extra £10 will enable you to do? Let’s go back to the homeless charity example: “Your gift of £10 will buy a person in crisis a hot meal, and the £10 match funding will give them a safe bed in the shelter tonight.” Finally, can you do something unique to bring the campaign to life? Belfast Print Workshop came up with this fun, share-worthy video in advance of last year’s Grow Your Tenner. 5. Is there anybody out there? Once you’ve planned your approach, it’s time to start spreading the word! Social media is a great place to start. Use any platform you are on to let people know about the campaign. Encourage your volunteers and/or staff to share posts made by your group’s page so the message reaches more people. Keep it visual, using photos and videos where possible. South Denbighshire Community Partnership recently used Facebook Live to broadcast their fundraiser, Alex, being waxed before competing in the Iron Man Wales triathlon! It was a great way to get people involved (the video got over a thousand views) and it generated more donations for Alex’s page.   As a Localgiving member, you’re part of a lively and diverse community of grassroots organisations across the UK. During the campaign, get inspiration and support each other by following #GrowYourTenner on Facebook and Twitter. Not only will you see all the great fundraising other groups are doing, you’ll also get the latest updates from Localgiving. Remember to use the hashtag in all your posts, too - we’ll share when we can! Don’t forget about your other communication channels. Have you approached the local news? You can upload a press release right from the Localgiving website! 6. Let me check my schedule Trying to stay on top of multiple social media channels can be tricky. Picture this: Grow Your Tenner starts at 10:00 on the 17th of October, and you’ve organised a special coffee morning at your local community centre to launch your fundraising appeal. You really should put some things on social media, but you’ll be busy speaking to people at the event. What a dilemma!   Enter: scheduling tools. Scheduling enables you to plan posts in advance, meaning you can be active on social media even when you’re busy doing things in the real world. Some platforms have scheduling features built in (e.g. Facebook), or you can use a dedicated service (e.g. Hootsuite) to manage multiple accounts. If you’ve never tried scheduling before, check out these handy guides: Scheduling a Facebook post Scheduling social media using Hootsuite   7. Let’s stay together Direct Debits account for 31% of all donations to UK charities. Regular donations are hugely important for small, local charities, helping them to stabilise their finances and plan for the future. A one-off donation of £120 can be daunting for many people, whereas £10 a month seems much more reasonable. A £10 monthly donation set up during the campaign will raise £210 over a 12 month period (including Gift Aid and match funding) - that’s a whopping £60 extra thanks to Grow Your Tenner! Tune in to our next webinar at 1pm on the 12th of October for some hints and tips on how to attract regular donors. 8. Mind your Ps and Qs If someone put money in your collection tin, you’d give them a friendly smile and a cheery thank you - so remember to do the same online! A timely and well-written thank you will make the donor feel appreciated. Nothing, on the other hand, might make them think twice about giving again in the future. Lots of thank yous to do? Remember you can send messages to donors directly from your Localgiving dashboard using 3 saved templates. Not sure where to start? Have a look at our guide to writing a good thank you message. If you’re feeling adventurous, try experimenting with different methods of sending thank yous - like TAPE Community Music & Film, who made this simple video after their recent appeal!   9. Don’t stop me now You’ve prepared well for the launch of Grow Your Tenner, and you get a few donations in on the the 17th. Success! Time to relax, right? Not yet! The campaign will run for as long as there is money in the pot (or until 16th of November - whichever comes first), so be sure to keep the momentum going. Because there’s a target to aim for, an appeal will help you to focus your fundraising and keep people engaged for the whole campaign. Keep posting on social media throughout Grow Your Tenner, and give updates about your fundraising. Remember to celebrate when you reach a milestone, and remind people that their donations will be matched for a limited time. Check out these 13 tips to help you run a successful appeal.   10. I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship Your interaction with a donor shouldn’t end at the point where they give - that’s only the start! Firstly, you’ll (ideally) be getting in touch within 24 hours to say thank you. From there, you could go back to them again at the end of Grow Your Tenner, to let them know how much you raised and your plans for the money. Once you’ve started using the money raised, get back in touch again with a progress update. This is your opportunity to really demonstrate the difference their money is making to the people you support. If you’re working on a capital project, could you send some before and after photos? If the money was for an event, could you send a video with snippets from the participants? Your aim should be to keep the donor interested, so you can go back to them in the future to let them know how they can get involved again - be that volunteering at an event, doing a sponsored challenge or donating to your next appeal. With these 10 tips, you should feel prepared to take on Grow Your Tenner - but remember you can call 0300 111 2340 or email help@localgiving.org for friendly help, support and fundraising advice. Good luck!  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Storytelling Tips for Charities by Becky Slack  5 free tools to share your organisation's story by Nisha Kotecha 
    Oct 06, 2017 2817
  • 19 Sep 2017
    When Healthy London Partnership began working with communities to tackle childhood obesity two years ago, I knew we were in for a challenge. Not only is childhood obesity an epidemic in London – with one in three children leaving primary school overweight or obese – and putting an increasing strain on the NHS; but we’re also seeing cuts to public health and prevention budgets. So our challenge was – how do we tackle childhood obesity in a way that is financially sustainable? The approach that evolved was one that included the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector, and which can be applied to almost any community-based challenge, anywhere. With an increasingly challenged health and care system, the need to stem the flow of demand is essential. We need place based services which understand the challenges, needs and assets of the communities around them; who know how to connect with those groups who are sometimes called ‘hard to reach’ and who are able to tailor and personalise their approach. I believe that organisations in the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector are some of the best to help fill this role. There are many examples of where they are already doing so, and providing invaluable support to their local communities. Not only do they often share many of the same health and wellbeing goals as public sector organisations, but they often add additional social value through the employment of local people, volunteering and training opportunities. On top of this, they are able to harness additional capital toward health goals – whether that be through trading revenue, grants, fundraising or social investment. Could the sector therefore play a critical role in tackling complex problems, in a sustainable way?  I am one of a growing tide of people who believe this to be the case. That’s why it’s so important that funders, including public sector commissioners, recognise this and do more to support the sector. Data shows that public sector funding to smaller charities has fallen by a third, and although they are trying to adapt to these changes by becoming more enterprising, they don’t always have the skills or support around them to do this successfully. A resulting 23,000 charities stopped operating across England and Wales between 2008 and 2013. We know that sustainable, diverse business models are possible for many voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations, and organisations like Localgiving are supporting this transition. Between 2008/09 and 2012/13, small and medium-sized charities increased their income through fundraising and charitable trading by up to 60%; and 31% of social enterprises reported making a profit last year. Funders should understand the unique role of their local voluntary, community and social enterprise sector but also their support needs. Where an organisation is creating positive impact in the local community, funders have a joint responsibility to support the shift toward a sustainable business model where possible. This is firstly important for their local communities to ensure they continue to have access to high quality and effective local services. Secondly it’s also important to reduce reliance of voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations on public sector funding - therefore reducing the risk posed by any future funding cuts and ensuring public sector funding is spent both effectively and efficiently. In my role as project manager in Healthy London Partnership’s prevention team, I’ve written this guide which discusses some of the ways commissioners can begin to take a more proactive role in supporting their local sector to deliver sustainable impact. This can be done within existing resources and can include adapting commissioning processes to recognise wider social value and ensuring money can reach smaller organisations; it can include supportive – or incubation - techniques such as sharing knowledge and skills with local organisations, brokering partnerships and networks or access to assets like office space; it could also include using blended finance to drive the development of sustainable income streams. While commissioners have a role to play, they aren’t solely responsible for the sustainability of their local voluntary, community and social enterprise sector. The sector itself will need to look within to ensure it is demonstrating impact and developing sustainable business models, including forming partnerships and alliances where appropriate. And other funders, infrastructure bodies, and the private sector will need to come together to ensure the value provided by local voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations is sustainable. Read and share the Commissioning Guide here. For more information about the guide or the work of Healthy London Partnership please email nwlccc.healthyinlondon@nhs.net Jessica Attard, Healthy London Partnership Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    How the Cardiff Half Marathon is helping our groups in Wales Sunshine Fundraising on our London Development Programme!    
    1243 Posted by Jessica Attard
  • When Healthy London Partnership began working with communities to tackle childhood obesity two years ago, I knew we were in for a challenge. Not only is childhood obesity an epidemic in London – with one in three children leaving primary school overweight or obese – and putting an increasing strain on the NHS; but we’re also seeing cuts to public health and prevention budgets. So our challenge was – how do we tackle childhood obesity in a way that is financially sustainable? The approach that evolved was one that included the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector, and which can be applied to almost any community-based challenge, anywhere. With an increasingly challenged health and care system, the need to stem the flow of demand is essential. We need place based services which understand the challenges, needs and assets of the communities around them; who know how to connect with those groups who are sometimes called ‘hard to reach’ and who are able to tailor and personalise their approach. I believe that organisations in the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector are some of the best to help fill this role. There are many examples of where they are already doing so, and providing invaluable support to their local communities. Not only do they often share many of the same health and wellbeing goals as public sector organisations, but they often add additional social value through the employment of local people, volunteering and training opportunities. On top of this, they are able to harness additional capital toward health goals – whether that be through trading revenue, grants, fundraising or social investment. Could the sector therefore play a critical role in tackling complex problems, in a sustainable way?  I am one of a growing tide of people who believe this to be the case. That’s why it’s so important that funders, including public sector commissioners, recognise this and do more to support the sector. Data shows that public sector funding to smaller charities has fallen by a third, and although they are trying to adapt to these changes by becoming more enterprising, they don’t always have the skills or support around them to do this successfully. A resulting 23,000 charities stopped operating across England and Wales between 2008 and 2013. We know that sustainable, diverse business models are possible for many voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations, and organisations like Localgiving are supporting this transition. Between 2008/09 and 2012/13, small and medium-sized charities increased their income through fundraising and charitable trading by up to 60%; and 31% of social enterprises reported making a profit last year. Funders should understand the unique role of their local voluntary, community and social enterprise sector but also their support needs. Where an organisation is creating positive impact in the local community, funders have a joint responsibility to support the shift toward a sustainable business model where possible. This is firstly important for their local communities to ensure they continue to have access to high quality and effective local services. Secondly it’s also important to reduce reliance of voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations on public sector funding - therefore reducing the risk posed by any future funding cuts and ensuring public sector funding is spent both effectively and efficiently. In my role as project manager in Healthy London Partnership’s prevention team, I’ve written this guide which discusses some of the ways commissioners can begin to take a more proactive role in supporting their local sector to deliver sustainable impact. This can be done within existing resources and can include adapting commissioning processes to recognise wider social value and ensuring money can reach smaller organisations; it can include supportive – or incubation - techniques such as sharing knowledge and skills with local organisations, brokering partnerships and networks or access to assets like office space; it could also include using blended finance to drive the development of sustainable income streams. While commissioners have a role to play, they aren’t solely responsible for the sustainability of their local voluntary, community and social enterprise sector. The sector itself will need to look within to ensure it is demonstrating impact and developing sustainable business models, including forming partnerships and alliances where appropriate. And other funders, infrastructure bodies, and the private sector will need to come together to ensure the value provided by local voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations is sustainable. Read and share the Commissioning Guide here. For more information about the guide or the work of Healthy London Partnership please email nwlccc.healthyinlondon@nhs.net Jessica Attard, Healthy London Partnership Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    How the Cardiff Half Marathon is helping our groups in Wales Sunshine Fundraising on our London Development Programme!    
    Sep 19, 2017 1243
  • 07 Aug 2017
    I was lucky enough to volunteer for two weeks at Localgiving, more specifically on the West of England Development Programme. I am interested in NGOs and the voluntary sector; particularly how to tackle the challenges of increasing demand for services and a more competitive fundraising environment. One of the main insights that I gained was how much Localgiving does to help local charities and community groups with their online fundraising.Localgiving provides the support and mentoring needed by groups to find their feet in this area - this was a very positive thing to witness. It really is a charity that invests directly in the sector. I spent the first week in Frome and the second in Bath and Bristol. My main responsibility was researching potential community groups and charities, in the Somerset and Bristol areas, who I thought might benefit from Localgiving support.I collated groups through visiting the library, a leisure centre and of course, the Internet. I was also able to sit-in on training sessions and meetings with charities and groups who were already members of Localgiving. I found these meetings particularly interesting, as I was able to gain an insight into how passionate they were about their causes. I also learnt about practical online fundraising and how much it can raise for a charity or community group. This was a subject I knew very little about, besides occasionally donating online myself. My volunteering showed me how useful online campaigning and fundraising for small charities can be. The statistic: ‘an online donation is worth double the amount of an offline donation’, emphasises this. Through Localgiving I came to understand the sheer number of charities and groups working within each local area. This opened my eyes to how great local communities can be - everyone should get involved in some way. There are huge numbers of people dedicating their skill and time to volunteering - to help others. This was a wonderful insight into the charity sector and reassuring in such challenging times. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    LSE Volunteer Centre: Do you have opportunities for volunteers?  Neymar your price: what is a footballer worth? When Being Angry Is Not Enough  
    1326 Posted by Rosie Coles
  • I was lucky enough to volunteer for two weeks at Localgiving, more specifically on the West of England Development Programme. I am interested in NGOs and the voluntary sector; particularly how to tackle the challenges of increasing demand for services and a more competitive fundraising environment. One of the main insights that I gained was how much Localgiving does to help local charities and community groups with their online fundraising.Localgiving provides the support and mentoring needed by groups to find their feet in this area - this was a very positive thing to witness. It really is a charity that invests directly in the sector. I spent the first week in Frome and the second in Bath and Bristol. My main responsibility was researching potential community groups and charities, in the Somerset and Bristol areas, who I thought might benefit from Localgiving support.I collated groups through visiting the library, a leisure centre and of course, the Internet. I was also able to sit-in on training sessions and meetings with charities and groups who were already members of Localgiving. I found these meetings particularly interesting, as I was able to gain an insight into how passionate they were about their causes. I also learnt about practical online fundraising and how much it can raise for a charity or community group. This was a subject I knew very little about, besides occasionally donating online myself. My volunteering showed me how useful online campaigning and fundraising for small charities can be. The statistic: ‘an online donation is worth double the amount of an offline donation’, emphasises this. Through Localgiving I came to understand the sheer number of charities and groups working within each local area. This opened my eyes to how great local communities can be - everyone should get involved in some way. There are huge numbers of people dedicating their skill and time to volunteering - to help others. This was a wonderful insight into the charity sector and reassuring in such challenging times. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    LSE Volunteer Centre: Do you have opportunities for volunteers?  Neymar your price: what is a footballer worth? When Being Angry Is Not Enough  
    Aug 07, 2017 1326
  • 04 Aug 2017
    Gabriella graduated from LSE in 2016 and is now the Volunteer Centre Coordinator. One of her main focuses is sourcing and promoting fulfilling and interesting one-off volunteering opportunities for LSE students LSE Volunteer Centre The LSE Volunteer Centre connects students with charities to help them find rewarding volunteering opportunities. About 40 percent of our students currently volunteer during their time at LSE and we aim to increase this number even further. We are therefore always on the lookout for interesting volunteering opportunities. Please read on to find out how you can get involved. How can you get involved? Upload your opportunities on our vacancy board. The easiest and quickest way to get involved is by uploading your volunteering roles on LSE CareerHub, our free online vacancy board. Once you’ve created an organisation account you can post your opportunities so our students and alumni (up to five years) can find them.  We’re looking for anything from one-offs to long-term opportunities and from event stewards to trustees, but we’re especially looking for skilled roles because LSE students have lots to offer. Our 2017 Partner Survey showed that all organisations were satisfied with the impact LSE students made in their organisation. ”All of the LSE students we have worked with this year have been incredibly dedicated, capable and efficient.” (2017 LSE Partner Survey)  One-off volunteering During term time we organise a one-off volunteering programme.  We’re looking for opportunities on a weekday, ranging from a couple of hours to a day. Previously students have sorted food, packed spit-kits and transcribed World War One diaries. We could also bring a group of students in as voluntary consultants to help you with a specific issue. Why not give us a call or send us an email to discuss the options. Apply for our 2017 Volunteering Fair Every year at the start of the academic year we organise a Volunteering Fair. This year’s fair takes place on Monday 2 October from 5-8pm. You can apply for a place at the fair by filling in our form until 3 September. Note that the fair is always oversubscribed so will inform you early September if your application has been successful. Write a blog for us We’re always on the lookout for engaging content so if you have LSE students volunteering with you, we’d love to hear about their experiences. Organisation can also write an informational blog post. Guidelines can be found on our website and you can contact us to discuss the options. Consultancy The LSE Volunteer Centre can also provide advice on (student) volunteer management. We can offer insight and guidance into the best practice for engaging student volunteers and can help you with your recruitment strategy. We can also help you with any other questions on student volunteering. “The LSE Volunteer Centre has been fantastic. They’ve helped us recruit volunteers, been quick to respond to any queries and have helped us build our future recruitment strategy. Thank you!” (2017 LSE Partner Survey) Want to know more? We would love to hear from you if you’d like to get involved with the LSE Volunteer Centre. Please see our website and blog for more information and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for updates. Or send an email to volunteer@lse.ac.uk and/or give David Coles, the Volunteer Centre Manager, a call on 020 7955 6519. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Neymar your price: what is a footballer worth? When Being Angry Is Not Enough  
    1692 Posted by Gabriella Monasso
  • Gabriella graduated from LSE in 2016 and is now the Volunteer Centre Coordinator. One of her main focuses is sourcing and promoting fulfilling and interesting one-off volunteering opportunities for LSE students LSE Volunteer Centre The LSE Volunteer Centre connects students with charities to help them find rewarding volunteering opportunities. About 40 percent of our students currently volunteer during their time at LSE and we aim to increase this number even further. We are therefore always on the lookout for interesting volunteering opportunities. Please read on to find out how you can get involved. How can you get involved? Upload your opportunities on our vacancy board. The easiest and quickest way to get involved is by uploading your volunteering roles on LSE CareerHub, our free online vacancy board. Once you’ve created an organisation account you can post your opportunities so our students and alumni (up to five years) can find them.  We’re looking for anything from one-offs to long-term opportunities and from event stewards to trustees, but we’re especially looking for skilled roles because LSE students have lots to offer. Our 2017 Partner Survey showed that all organisations were satisfied with the impact LSE students made in their organisation. ”All of the LSE students we have worked with this year have been incredibly dedicated, capable and efficient.” (2017 LSE Partner Survey)  One-off volunteering During term time we organise a one-off volunteering programme.  We’re looking for opportunities on a weekday, ranging from a couple of hours to a day. Previously students have sorted food, packed spit-kits and transcribed World War One diaries. We could also bring a group of students in as voluntary consultants to help you with a specific issue. Why not give us a call or send us an email to discuss the options. Apply for our 2017 Volunteering Fair Every year at the start of the academic year we organise a Volunteering Fair. This year’s fair takes place on Monday 2 October from 5-8pm. You can apply for a place at the fair by filling in our form until 3 September. Note that the fair is always oversubscribed so will inform you early September if your application has been successful. Write a blog for us We’re always on the lookout for engaging content so if you have LSE students volunteering with you, we’d love to hear about their experiences. Organisation can also write an informational blog post. Guidelines can be found on our website and you can contact us to discuss the options. Consultancy The LSE Volunteer Centre can also provide advice on (student) volunteer management. We can offer insight and guidance into the best practice for engaging student volunteers and can help you with your recruitment strategy. We can also help you with any other questions on student volunteering. “The LSE Volunteer Centre has been fantastic. They’ve helped us recruit volunteers, been quick to respond to any queries and have helped us build our future recruitment strategy. Thank you!” (2017 LSE Partner Survey) Want to know more? We would love to hear from you if you’d like to get involved with the LSE Volunteer Centre. Please see our website and blog for more information and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for updates. Or send an email to volunteer@lse.ac.uk and/or give David Coles, the Volunteer Centre Manager, a call on 020 7955 6519. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Neymar your price: what is a footballer worth? When Being Angry Is Not Enough  
    Aug 04, 2017 1692
  • 31 May 2017
    At the Foundation for Social Improvement (FSI) we support small and local charities and community organisations (with a turnover under £1.5 million), providing free or very heavily subsidised training and support. We were established in 2007 to help these organisations keep their doors open for the vulnerable groups they work with. We do this via a learning programme which focusses on fundraising, governance, measuring and demonstrating impact and strategy and planning. Unsurprisingly, by far the most popular area for support is fundraising. At a time when charities are facing unprecedented funding cuts and an increasing demand for services (REF) it is more important now than ever before that we are maximising our potential to secure funds. Some of our top tips to help you do this include: Get your house in order How are you supposed to effectively support the sustainability for your organisation if you don’t know exactly how much you need to fundraise and where you are going to get it? Developing a fundraising strategy can often be dismissed as a paper exercise, but actually this is the road map to your fundraising success. It builds a clear plan of activity to be followed whilst also evaluating the activities that are likely to bring you the greatest return on investment. It obviously can’t be denied that it takes time and effort to build a fundraising strategy, however the direction it provides will support you to maintain a fundraising focus which will help save you time later down the line when you are attempting to deliver against fundraising targets. Evaluate and Review as you go It is very east to fall into a trap of activity simply because ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it’. Reviewing and refreshing your activity is essential to ensure you truly are investing your time and resource in the most fruitful fundraising activities for your charity. The only way you will know to put a stop to the activities that don’t bring in the required return is to evaluate each one against key performance indicators or targets and not being afraid to say lets try something different. This is where your fundraising strategy will come in handy again as you will have thought out in advance what you would expect to see from your individual fundraising activities to help you to look at your fundraising efforts objectively. Stick to the plan (sort of) Rather than trying to overstretch and have too many fingers in the different fundraising pies, it is better to look realistically at what you can achieve with your resource and work on doing these well. There are only so many hours in a day so there’s no point in setting yourself up to fail, instead you will be supporting your success if you focus on doing a few things really well, rather than trying to do everything at once. There will be time to expand your activity when your focus pays off and you are able to gain extra resource. At the same time it’s also important to know when it’s appropriate to engage with unexpected opportunities or external events that can support your fundraising activity as flexibility in fund development is also important. A safe way to do this is to establish a process on how to decide whether a new opportunity is worth going for, whether it’s getting sign off from a fundraising steering committee or your Trustees or bringing new ideas to your manager for sign off. Use Small Charity Week to your advantage As well as providing a support programme for charities, the FSI are also the organisation behind Small Charity Week. This year it is taking place between 19th-24th June and the week is packed full of opportunities to support your charity to raise vital funds and your profile. The full agenda can be found on the Small Charity Week website but also includes opportunities such as: Places at the FSI’s annual Fundraising Conference in London – there are only a few left so book today A matched fund with LocalGiving providing £25,000 worth of funding An eBay Auction where you keep all of the funds for the items you provide and have the chance of winning £2,000 of matched funds The chance to fundraise from eBay shoppers by submitting a 90-character fundraising message (deadline 2nd June) 1:1 Fundraising Advice via the FSI’s Big Advice Day – expertise comes from a mixture of funders and fundraisers Free fundraising guides to support you to run your own events and activities Leetchi’s money pot competition for the chance to gain an additional £1,000 of funding The opportunity to win cash prizes by asking your supporters to say why they love you on social media These are just some of the free activities available during the week, with six days of separate activities check out the full agenda to make sure you’re not missing out Full details on www.smallcharityweek.com or follow @SCWeek2017 for breaking news. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Subconscious Effects of Storytelling in Charity Marketing Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs  
    3290 Posted by Conchita Garcia
  • At the Foundation for Social Improvement (FSI) we support small and local charities and community organisations (with a turnover under £1.5 million), providing free or very heavily subsidised training and support. We were established in 2007 to help these organisations keep their doors open for the vulnerable groups they work with. We do this via a learning programme which focusses on fundraising, governance, measuring and demonstrating impact and strategy and planning. Unsurprisingly, by far the most popular area for support is fundraising. At a time when charities are facing unprecedented funding cuts and an increasing demand for services (REF) it is more important now than ever before that we are maximising our potential to secure funds. Some of our top tips to help you do this include: Get your house in order How are you supposed to effectively support the sustainability for your organisation if you don’t know exactly how much you need to fundraise and where you are going to get it? Developing a fundraising strategy can often be dismissed as a paper exercise, but actually this is the road map to your fundraising success. It builds a clear plan of activity to be followed whilst also evaluating the activities that are likely to bring you the greatest return on investment. It obviously can’t be denied that it takes time and effort to build a fundraising strategy, however the direction it provides will support you to maintain a fundraising focus which will help save you time later down the line when you are attempting to deliver against fundraising targets. Evaluate and Review as you go It is very east to fall into a trap of activity simply because ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it’. Reviewing and refreshing your activity is essential to ensure you truly are investing your time and resource in the most fruitful fundraising activities for your charity. The only way you will know to put a stop to the activities that don’t bring in the required return is to evaluate each one against key performance indicators or targets and not being afraid to say lets try something different. This is where your fundraising strategy will come in handy again as you will have thought out in advance what you would expect to see from your individual fundraising activities to help you to look at your fundraising efforts objectively. Stick to the plan (sort of) Rather than trying to overstretch and have too many fingers in the different fundraising pies, it is better to look realistically at what you can achieve with your resource and work on doing these well. There are only so many hours in a day so there’s no point in setting yourself up to fail, instead you will be supporting your success if you focus on doing a few things really well, rather than trying to do everything at once. There will be time to expand your activity when your focus pays off and you are able to gain extra resource. At the same time it’s also important to know when it’s appropriate to engage with unexpected opportunities or external events that can support your fundraising activity as flexibility in fund development is also important. A safe way to do this is to establish a process on how to decide whether a new opportunity is worth going for, whether it’s getting sign off from a fundraising steering committee or your Trustees or bringing new ideas to your manager for sign off. Use Small Charity Week to your advantage As well as providing a support programme for charities, the FSI are also the organisation behind Small Charity Week. This year it is taking place between 19th-24th June and the week is packed full of opportunities to support your charity to raise vital funds and your profile. The full agenda can be found on the Small Charity Week website but also includes opportunities such as: Places at the FSI’s annual Fundraising Conference in London – there are only a few left so book today A matched fund with LocalGiving providing £25,000 worth of funding An eBay Auction where you keep all of the funds for the items you provide and have the chance of winning £2,000 of matched funds The chance to fundraise from eBay shoppers by submitting a 90-character fundraising message (deadline 2nd June) 1:1 Fundraising Advice via the FSI’s Big Advice Day – expertise comes from a mixture of funders and fundraisers Free fundraising guides to support you to run your own events and activities Leetchi’s money pot competition for the chance to gain an additional £1,000 of funding The opportunity to win cash prizes by asking your supporters to say why they love you on social media These are just some of the free activities available during the week, with six days of separate activities check out the full agenda to make sure you’re not missing out Full details on www.smallcharityweek.com or follow @SCWeek2017 for breaking news. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    The Subconscious Effects of Storytelling in Charity Marketing Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs  
    May 31, 2017 3290
  • 03 May 2017
    A couple of years ago, a friend of mine introduced me to an NGO for rescuing chained or caged dogs. Their Facebook page had sweet intros to all the animals awaiting adoption and featured photos of their daily activities at the rescue center. Over time, I got quite familiar with the dogs there just through their social media feed. Even though the organization is in a different state and I’ve never actually met the dogs, I felt a personal bond and continue to donate towards their well being, ever so often.   That bond is developed through the compelling power of storytelling. Well, sure, as a dog lover, I’ve always had a soft spot for those fuzzy goofballs. However, Storytelling can help get you build an emotional connection between the audience and any character by affecting their subconscious. Let’s have a look at how these subconscious effects come into play and the approach to making it work in marketing your charity. 1) Help the audience reach the conclusion One of the primary rules of storytelling is “Show; don’t tell”. Instead of stating facts about the good guy and the bad guy, the characters are introduced through their actions and decisions. We start to root for the protagonist because the story aligns our values and morals with whatever the protagonist is fighting for. Since the story guides our emotions through these subconscious decisions, the choice of which side we relate to doesn’t seem forced upon us. In a similar way, your charity has to let the audience come to the conclusion that you are working for something positive. Giving them facts and figures is fine but real-world examples allow them to decide whether they support your cause. 2. Offer a fresh take on a common story structure If you look closely at the overall story of classic books and movies, they are almost the same - a hero taking on something beyond their depth, a larger-than-life villain threatening to ruin the world forever and even parallel ups and downs of the characters as the hero journeys to save the world. But every time the storyteller gives their personal spin on the characters and what’s at stake in the world. This makes the audience stay hooked throughout. When it comes to your charity, come up with a fresh perspective to the problem so that people can imagine their contribution doing its part to lead to a better world. 3. Build trust through familiarity In stories, the protagonist is never someone very different from us. Even if the story is set in a different world or features characters that aren’t human, the storyteller gives them a touch of personality people can relate to. That is because when our brain encounters something familiar, it makes us comfortable. We are more likely to trust in someone that comes across as familiar. This subconscious effect is very important when it comes to building trust for your charity. Create a logo and an identity that people can recognise. Have an active social media presence and talk about the progress made through your activities. 4. Have stories of redemption to share A redemption arc is another classic storytelling element that makes the hero a star in our eyes - halfway through the story, the hero faces the main villain, loses the battle and, is often, left in a poor state. But being the hero, he doesn’t quit. The rise of the fallen hero makes us root for his cause even more. Share stories where your charity or someone you’ve worked with goes on against the insurmountable odds working against them. You gain more admiration for trying than for success. 5. Show how the world you are trying to fix is broken Storytellers make a point to drive home the bleak reality in store in case the protagonist fails. It is not a world people want to be a part of. In fact, it is made clear how the world will change and end up worse than how it was at the outset of the tale if the bad guy is not stopped. Projecting this dark future is important to ensure no one wants the villain to win. Of course, in the real world, the cause you’re working for might not be so dire. People will only be willing to do their bit if you make sure they can envision how bad things would be if you did nothing. Project the alternative and help the audience see how it will worsen the situation in the future. A lot more people will be willing to step up and do their part for your initiative. These subconscious effects are part of human thought and reaction. They have been used in storytelling for centuries to guide the audience’s emotional journey. Use these in your charity marketing to increase support for your cause. Augustus Franklin is the founder and CEO of CallHub, a California-based Voice and SMS service company bridging the communication gap for political campaigns and advocacy groups. When he is not working, he is either making toys with his kids or training for a marathon. If you enjoyed this article you may also like: 3 Ways Small Charities can get Expertise They Need for Free How to be a better donor in one easy step Developing a Fundraising Plan - Strategies and Ideas  
    2876 Posted by Augustus Franklin
  • A couple of years ago, a friend of mine introduced me to an NGO for rescuing chained or caged dogs. Their Facebook page had sweet intros to all the animals awaiting adoption and featured photos of their daily activities at the rescue center. Over time, I got quite familiar with the dogs there just through their social media feed. Even though the organization is in a different state and I’ve never actually met the dogs, I felt a personal bond and continue to donate towards their well being, ever so often.   That bond is developed through the compelling power of storytelling. Well, sure, as a dog lover, I’ve always had a soft spot for those fuzzy goofballs. However, Storytelling can help get you build an emotional connection between the audience and any character by affecting their subconscious. Let’s have a look at how these subconscious effects come into play and the approach to making it work in marketing your charity. 1) Help the audience reach the conclusion One of the primary rules of storytelling is “Show; don’t tell”. Instead of stating facts about the good guy and the bad guy, the characters are introduced through their actions and decisions. We start to root for the protagonist because the story aligns our values and morals with whatever the protagonist is fighting for. Since the story guides our emotions through these subconscious decisions, the choice of which side we relate to doesn’t seem forced upon us. In a similar way, your charity has to let the audience come to the conclusion that you are working for something positive. Giving them facts and figures is fine but real-world examples allow them to decide whether they support your cause. 2. Offer a fresh take on a common story structure If you look closely at the overall story of classic books and movies, they are almost the same - a hero taking on something beyond their depth, a larger-than-life villain threatening to ruin the world forever and even parallel ups and downs of the characters as the hero journeys to save the world. But every time the storyteller gives their personal spin on the characters and what’s at stake in the world. This makes the audience stay hooked throughout. When it comes to your charity, come up with a fresh perspective to the problem so that people can imagine their contribution doing its part to lead to a better world. 3. Build trust through familiarity In stories, the protagonist is never someone very different from us. Even if the story is set in a different world or features characters that aren’t human, the storyteller gives them a touch of personality people can relate to. That is because when our brain encounters something familiar, it makes us comfortable. We are more likely to trust in someone that comes across as familiar. This subconscious effect is very important when it comes to building trust for your charity. Create a logo and an identity that people can recognise. Have an active social media presence and talk about the progress made through your activities. 4. Have stories of redemption to share A redemption arc is another classic storytelling element that makes the hero a star in our eyes - halfway through the story, the hero faces the main villain, loses the battle and, is often, left in a poor state. But being the hero, he doesn’t quit. The rise of the fallen hero makes us root for his cause even more. Share stories where your charity or someone you’ve worked with goes on against the insurmountable odds working against them. You gain more admiration for trying than for success. 5. Show how the world you are trying to fix is broken Storytellers make a point to drive home the bleak reality in store in case the protagonist fails. It is not a world people want to be a part of. In fact, it is made clear how the world will change and end up worse than how it was at the outset of the tale if the bad guy is not stopped. Projecting this dark future is important to ensure no one wants the villain to win. Of course, in the real world, the cause you’re working for might not be so dire. People will only be willing to do their bit if you make sure they can envision how bad things would be if you did nothing. Project the alternative and help the audience see how it will worsen the situation in the future. A lot more people will be willing to step up and do their part for your initiative. These subconscious effects are part of human thought and reaction. They have been used in storytelling for centuries to guide the audience’s emotional journey. Use these in your charity marketing to increase support for your cause. Augustus Franklin is the founder and CEO of CallHub, a California-based Voice and SMS service company bridging the communication gap for political campaigns and advocacy groups. When he is not working, he is either making toys with his kids or training for a marathon. If you enjoyed this article you may also like: 3 Ways Small Charities can get Expertise They Need for Free How to be a better donor in one easy step Developing a Fundraising Plan - Strategies and Ideas  
    May 03, 2017 2876
  • 19 Apr 2017
     The Big Heart Network - the North West's marketing skills and support network for charities and social enterprises - share their top Twitter tips  Do you feel overwhelmed by social media? Has it started to feel like a massive time suck? Maintaining a professional and productive online presence can be hard graft especially for organisations facing staff or budget constraints.  But take heart! We have four time-saving Twitter tips that will make you fall back in love with the social media channel that never stops tweeting.  Define your audience  Tweeting out great content all hours of the day and getting no interaction can be soul-destroying. So sit back and take stock.  Decide who you really want to reach. Are you keen to position your organisation as expert in its sector, do want to keep staff and volunteers up to date, attract the interest of the media or reach current supporters and potential donors?  Once you have zeroed in on the target audience, work out when they will be online for the best chance of your tweet being seen by them.  Use analytic tools available in Twitter or another app to confirm the optimum time through test tweets.  Content calendar  Trying to come up with new ideas every morning is stressful and the quality of the content does suffer.  Stop right now! Instead take time to construct a media calendar, populated with your organisation's events, campaigns, key occasions in your sector and external diary dates. Breaking news can be posted around these diaried events - instant inspiration and you will never forget to tweet about an important date ever again.  Curate rather create  It is hugely time-consuming to create enough original matter to populate a Twitter feed. The message becomes monotonous if your audience is only ever hearing one voice. So, to kill two birds with one stone follow the rule of thirds. For every original tweet, retweet another account and reply to someone else.  Using the quote retweet function allows you another 140 words to add a commentary to expand your thoughts on the original tweet.  The rule of thirds provides variety, additional value, encourages engagement as well as positions your organisation as a thought leader in its sector  A word of warning: make sure you only direct retweet trustworthy sources and read or watch links in their entirety to avoid any unpleasant surprises.  Time-saving tools  Don't get caught in the cycle of having to post tweets 'live'. Set aside some time to schedule a number of tweets in advance using tools such as Buffer or Hootsuite. It an especially efficient way to deal with diaried events from your content calendar.  In the same vein, Hootlet is a free browser plugin which allows you to immediately add shortened page URL and a message with the link's title to your Hootsuite schedule without having to open Hootsuite and copy the link across – great for quick curated content. Grace Dyke is Strategic Director at PR and Communications social enterprise, Yellow Jigsaw. The Yellow Jigsaw team manage PR and fundraising campaigns for regional and national charities, as well as managing the North West's only dedicated skills and support network for charities and social enterprises, the Big Heart Network.  Big Heart Network puts its heart and soul into helping charities and social enterprises. Contact us on hello@yellowjigsaw.co.uk and visit our page to see when the next lunch and learn social media sessions will be held. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero: The half way leaders are... Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times      
    1621 Posted by Grace Dyke
  •  The Big Heart Network - the North West's marketing skills and support network for charities and social enterprises - share their top Twitter tips  Do you feel overwhelmed by social media? Has it started to feel like a massive time suck? Maintaining a professional and productive online presence can be hard graft especially for organisations facing staff or budget constraints.  But take heart! We have four time-saving Twitter tips that will make you fall back in love with the social media channel that never stops tweeting.  Define your audience  Tweeting out great content all hours of the day and getting no interaction can be soul-destroying. So sit back and take stock.  Decide who you really want to reach. Are you keen to position your organisation as expert in its sector, do want to keep staff and volunteers up to date, attract the interest of the media or reach current supporters and potential donors?  Once you have zeroed in on the target audience, work out when they will be online for the best chance of your tweet being seen by them.  Use analytic tools available in Twitter or another app to confirm the optimum time through test tweets.  Content calendar  Trying to come up with new ideas every morning is stressful and the quality of the content does suffer.  Stop right now! Instead take time to construct a media calendar, populated with your organisation's events, campaigns, key occasions in your sector and external diary dates. Breaking news can be posted around these diaried events - instant inspiration and you will never forget to tweet about an important date ever again.  Curate rather create  It is hugely time-consuming to create enough original matter to populate a Twitter feed. The message becomes monotonous if your audience is only ever hearing one voice. So, to kill two birds with one stone follow the rule of thirds. For every original tweet, retweet another account and reply to someone else.  Using the quote retweet function allows you another 140 words to add a commentary to expand your thoughts on the original tweet.  The rule of thirds provides variety, additional value, encourages engagement as well as positions your organisation as a thought leader in its sector  A word of warning: make sure you only direct retweet trustworthy sources and read or watch links in their entirety to avoid any unpleasant surprises.  Time-saving tools  Don't get caught in the cycle of having to post tweets 'live'. Set aside some time to schedule a number of tweets in advance using tools such as Buffer or Hootsuite. It an especially efficient way to deal with diaried events from your content calendar.  In the same vein, Hootlet is a free browser plugin which allows you to immediately add shortened page URL and a message with the link's title to your Hootsuite schedule without having to open Hootsuite and copy the link across – great for quick curated content. Grace Dyke is Strategic Director at PR and Communications social enterprise, Yellow Jigsaw. The Yellow Jigsaw team manage PR and fundraising campaigns for regional and national charities, as well as managing the North West's only dedicated skills and support network for charities and social enterprises, the Big Heart Network.  Big Heart Network puts its heart and soul into helping charities and social enterprises. Contact us on hello@yellowjigsaw.co.uk and visit our page to see when the next lunch and learn social media sessions will be held. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Local Hero: The half way leaders are... Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times      
    Apr 19, 2017 1621
  • 03 Apr 2017
    It’s easy to be a better donor. All you need to do is ask for your donation to be used for core costs. Why 'core costs'? 1) Because if you ask any charity* what they need and what they find hardest to fund, they will always reply “core costs”. Take this diagram from the recent State of the VCSE Sector in Somerset report which shows the responses to the question ”what three areas do you find it hardest to raise funds for?” If you trust the charity to deliver positive social change, then why not trust them to know what they need to spend your money on. 2) The clue is in the name ‘core’. These are all the things at the heart of a charity that they need to pay for before they can do any good. They are often not very interesting: electricity bills, auditor fees, rent, IT support contracts. The largest cost is usually staff wages – vital if you want to build trusting relationships with the most vulnerable people in society. Staff salaries, including for senior managers and CEOs, are not a ‘nice to have’ – they are fundamental. A charity cannot commit to supporting a care leaver for the next few years as they transition into adulthood, if they don’t think their team or even their organisation will still be around to see this through. Neither can they commit to providing vital community transport or counselling for someone with a life limiting condition or being there for people in recovery from mental ill health. They need a solid core to offer consistent and long-term support. And surely that long-term help is what any donors wants to support? 3) Charities are experiencing many demands – loss of statutory funding, increased demands for services, changes in technology. They need to adapt – to work with others, to deliver services in new ways, to grow or develop. If their core is wobbly then it is hard to find the time, the headspace, the resources needed to make good decisions about how best to change. There is a need to invest in the core of any charity to ensure it continues to focus on delivering relevant, quality services – and if it is looking to grow then, of course, the core needs to grow too. Source: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/08/16/graphic-re-visioning-nonprofit-overhead/ 4) And finally, as a donor giving core funding, you can feel reassured that you have done the most good you can with your donation. You will have demonstrated your trust in your chosen charity, your commitment to their future and your understanding of what they need. I have no doubt that you will receive heartfelt thanks. * I am using ‘charity’ to mean any social purpose organisations including voluntary groups, community interest companies and social enterprises. Emma Beeston advises philanthropists and grant makers on how best to direct their money to the causes they care about. Support includes strategy and programme design, scoping studies, assessments and monitoring visits. www.emmabeeston.co.uk; emma@emmabeeston.co.uk; @emmabeeston01  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    2359 Posted by Emma Beeston
  • It’s easy to be a better donor. All you need to do is ask for your donation to be used for core costs. Why 'core costs'? 1) Because if you ask any charity* what they need and what they find hardest to fund, they will always reply “core costs”. Take this diagram from the recent State of the VCSE Sector in Somerset report which shows the responses to the question ”what three areas do you find it hardest to raise funds for?” If you trust the charity to deliver positive social change, then why not trust them to know what they need to spend your money on. 2) The clue is in the name ‘core’. These are all the things at the heart of a charity that they need to pay for before they can do any good. They are often not very interesting: electricity bills, auditor fees, rent, IT support contracts. The largest cost is usually staff wages – vital if you want to build trusting relationships with the most vulnerable people in society. Staff salaries, including for senior managers and CEOs, are not a ‘nice to have’ – they are fundamental. A charity cannot commit to supporting a care leaver for the next few years as they transition into adulthood, if they don’t think their team or even their organisation will still be around to see this through. Neither can they commit to providing vital community transport or counselling for someone with a life limiting condition or being there for people in recovery from mental ill health. They need a solid core to offer consistent and long-term support. And surely that long-term help is what any donors wants to support? 3) Charities are experiencing many demands – loss of statutory funding, increased demands for services, changes in technology. They need to adapt – to work with others, to deliver services in new ways, to grow or develop. If their core is wobbly then it is hard to find the time, the headspace, the resources needed to make good decisions about how best to change. There is a need to invest in the core of any charity to ensure it continues to focus on delivering relevant, quality services – and if it is looking to grow then, of course, the core needs to grow too. Source: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/08/16/graphic-re-visioning-nonprofit-overhead/ 4) And finally, as a donor giving core funding, you can feel reassured that you have done the most good you can with your donation. You will have demonstrated your trust in your chosen charity, your commitment to their future and your understanding of what they need. I have no doubt that you will receive heartfelt thanks. * I am using ‘charity’ to mean any social purpose organisations including voluntary groups, community interest companies and social enterprises. Emma Beeston advises philanthropists and grant makers on how best to direct their money to the causes they care about. Support includes strategy and programme design, scoping studies, assessments and monitoring visits. www.emmabeeston.co.uk; emma@emmabeeston.co.uk; @emmabeeston01  Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Do you have the courage to let your supporters own their story? 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times       4 Steps to the perfect charity Video  
    Apr 03, 2017 2359
  • 15 Mar 2017
    Insurance is a key part of the risk management process for charities and community groups. It’s vital that non-profit groups that do so much good, with so few resources, are protected. And insurance can provide that protection. With the financial security of insurance, your organisation can focus all its resources on its charitable aims! Let’s start with the basics; what’s required by law? Employers liability is a legal requirement if you have any employees. £5 million indemnity is required, but £10m is now standard. Some charity insurance policies will also cover your volunteers as if they were employees under Employers Liability insurance rather than third parties covered by your Public Liability policy. This gives them better cover. Also, if you own and operate motor vehicles, you’re legally required to appropriately insure them. Read more about whether your organisation legally needs insurance. Is it important to be insured beyond the legal requirements? Yes! The primary function of insurance is protecting your organisation from the financial burden of claims and protecting your assets in the event of claims. Should you be unfortunate enough to have a member of the public slip on your premises, despite your best risk management efforts, you may be liable for a large claim – this is the sort of claim that could shut down your organisation and put a stop to all the good that you have been doing. What could happen if we’re not insured? This depends on your charity or community group structure. However, if you’re not a registered charity and someone has cause to make a claim against you, it is possible that they will take you to court. If you lose the court battle, then you are personally liable for the entire claim amount. Equally, even if you are a registered charity, a claimant may choose to take the charity to court and, in some circumstances, pursue compensation from the trustees. Whatever the situation, in the event of a claim, if you don’t have insurance then your charity and community group is at serious risk of financial ruin. And there’s potentially a significant risk to the board of trustees too. What should we do about insurance? The first step towards insuring your organisation should be discussing your requirements with charity insurance specialists. There are specialist charity insurance providers and brokers that can assist you with your insurance requirements and risk management. What insurance should we consider buying? Beyond the legal requirements of Employers Liability and Motor (if you operate vehicles), you may consider a range of insurance product. Common cover required by charities and community groups include Public Liability, Property, Trustee Indemnity, Professional Indemnity, Fidelity and more. Tell us about the common insurance covers for charities and community groups. Public Liability protects you from claims made by members of the public who have suffered personal injury or property damage because of your charity or community group. Property Damage insures your building, contents and assets against loss, theft or damage and is key to risk management. Trustee Indemnity protects your board of trustees from claims made against them or the organisation. This will help your trustees sleep well at night and can help you recruit top quality trustees. Professional Indemnity protects you if you provide any professional, advice or counselling services or similar. And Fidelity cover insures you against theft or fraud by an employee, volunteer or trustee.  Elaine Denny has been working in the Charity Insurance sector for 10 years and supports all of CaSE Insurance’s charity clients. You can contact Elaine on 01372 227 634 or by email, at elainedenny@caseinsurance.co.uk. CaSE Insurance was established and is part-owned by the charity law firm Bates Wells Braithwaite and by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO). CaSE represents a unique partnership between charity and insurance specialists. You can find out more about CaSE at www.caseinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0333 800 9838. CaSE Insurance is proud to offer free and impartial risk management and insurance advice to Localgiving members. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity Video How Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs
    1814 Posted by Elaine Denny
  • Insurance is a key part of the risk management process for charities and community groups. It’s vital that non-profit groups that do so much good, with so few resources, are protected. And insurance can provide that protection. With the financial security of insurance, your organisation can focus all its resources on its charitable aims! Let’s start with the basics; what’s required by law? Employers liability is a legal requirement if you have any employees. £5 million indemnity is required, but £10m is now standard. Some charity insurance policies will also cover your volunteers as if they were employees under Employers Liability insurance rather than third parties covered by your Public Liability policy. This gives them better cover. Also, if you own and operate motor vehicles, you’re legally required to appropriately insure them. Read more about whether your organisation legally needs insurance. Is it important to be insured beyond the legal requirements? Yes! The primary function of insurance is protecting your organisation from the financial burden of claims and protecting your assets in the event of claims. Should you be unfortunate enough to have a member of the public slip on your premises, despite your best risk management efforts, you may be liable for a large claim – this is the sort of claim that could shut down your organisation and put a stop to all the good that you have been doing. What could happen if we’re not insured? This depends on your charity or community group structure. However, if you’re not a registered charity and someone has cause to make a claim against you, it is possible that they will take you to court. If you lose the court battle, then you are personally liable for the entire claim amount. Equally, even if you are a registered charity, a claimant may choose to take the charity to court and, in some circumstances, pursue compensation from the trustees. Whatever the situation, in the event of a claim, if you don’t have insurance then your charity and community group is at serious risk of financial ruin. And there’s potentially a significant risk to the board of trustees too. What should we do about insurance? The first step towards insuring your organisation should be discussing your requirements with charity insurance specialists. There are specialist charity insurance providers and brokers that can assist you with your insurance requirements and risk management. What insurance should we consider buying? Beyond the legal requirements of Employers Liability and Motor (if you operate vehicles), you may consider a range of insurance product. Common cover required by charities and community groups include Public Liability, Property, Trustee Indemnity, Professional Indemnity, Fidelity and more. Tell us about the common insurance covers for charities and community groups. Public Liability protects you from claims made by members of the public who have suffered personal injury or property damage because of your charity or community group. Property Damage insures your building, contents and assets against loss, theft or damage and is key to risk management. Trustee Indemnity protects your board of trustees from claims made against them or the organisation. This will help your trustees sleep well at night and can help you recruit top quality trustees. Professional Indemnity protects you if you provide any professional, advice or counselling services or similar. And Fidelity cover insures you against theft or fraud by an employee, volunteer or trustee.  Elaine Denny has been working in the Charity Insurance sector for 10 years and supports all of CaSE Insurance’s charity clients. You can contact Elaine on 01372 227 634 or by email, at elainedenny@caseinsurance.co.uk. CaSE Insurance was established and is part-owned by the charity law firm Bates Wells Braithwaite and by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO). CaSE represents a unique partnership between charity and insurance specialists. You can find out more about CaSE at www.caseinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0333 800 9838. CaSE Insurance is proud to offer free and impartial risk management and insurance advice to Localgiving members. Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    4 Steps to the perfect charity Video How Small charities can overcome barriers to brand investment Focus on the outcomes of your work rather than the outputs
    Mar 15, 2017 1814
  • 13 Mar 2017
    You're a proud fundraiser for a local charity and you enjoy what you do. But whether you like it or not, you're still tasked with the ever growing problem of getting money in and often it can feel like a losing battle. People just don't get what you do and you find it difficult to explain it in a way that appeals to potential supporters. You don't know where to start.   Why are you struggling? Maybe you feel your charity is different from the rest, you're not trying to raise money for a 'sexy' cause and find it hard to talk about making a difference.   In my previous role as a Grants Officer I often found charities were far too reserved in speaking out about what they did and more importantly the people they helped! But this is key to raising money. Case studies, quotes and photos all help to illustrate the positive impact your charity is making.    To be able to show the impact that you are making it is important to focus on the outcomes that funding would bring rather than the outputs.   Example: A Dial a Ride charity needs to raise money to pay volunteer driver expenses each month. The charity struggles to raise money and feels it's just not sexy enough to appeal to donors. When fundraising it often focuses on how funding would cover the cost of fuel to get people from A to B each week.  Sadly the charity has failed to look at the bigger picture and could potentially miss out on funding. It has focused on an outputs of its work rather than the outcomes and what it could achieve if it raises the money.   If your charity is in a similar situation and snuggles to talk about impact and outcomes think about:   1. What would happen to beneficiaries if they weren't able to use your service?   2. Why do people need your service, what situations are they in?   3. Do you have any case studies to highlight the difference you are making?   4. What impact does your work have on those that volunteer? Why do they volunteer?    Going back to the example of the Dial a Ride service, what it failed to realise was the positive difference it was having on the lives of not only the people that used the service but the volunteer drivers too! Many of the drivers were retired and chose to volunteer regular time each week to give them something constructive to do, a purpose. Something to get up for in the mornings. They enjoyed the camaraderie between one another and the contact they had with the local community. They felt as though they were doing their bit to give something back.   Furthermore the people that were using the service often called it a 'life line' and without it they said their lives would be very different. Many users suffered from rural isolation and so often felt trapped in their own homes, due to old age and disability.    When you next come to fundraise for your cause, whether it's online or through a grant application, use the questions above to help tell your story. Include as much detail as possible to make sure your voice is heard and let people know the great work that you are doing every day.    For inspiration check out these great fundraising pages on our site: Park in the Past  The Josephine and Jack Project Street Talk     Good luck with your fundraising!     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Wise Words from Alistair Sill: Local Hero Champion 2016                 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times   Image courtesy of 
    1938 Posted by Emma Rawlingson
  • You're a proud fundraiser for a local charity and you enjoy what you do. But whether you like it or not, you're still tasked with the ever growing problem of getting money in and often it can feel like a losing battle. People just don't get what you do and you find it difficult to explain it in a way that appeals to potential supporters. You don't know where to start.   Why are you struggling? Maybe you feel your charity is different from the rest, you're not trying to raise money for a 'sexy' cause and find it hard to talk about making a difference.   In my previous role as a Grants Officer I often found charities were far too reserved in speaking out about what they did and more importantly the people they helped! But this is key to raising money. Case studies, quotes and photos all help to illustrate the positive impact your charity is making.    To be able to show the impact that you are making it is important to focus on the outcomes that funding would bring rather than the outputs.   Example: A Dial a Ride charity needs to raise money to pay volunteer driver expenses each month. The charity struggles to raise money and feels it's just not sexy enough to appeal to donors. When fundraising it often focuses on how funding would cover the cost of fuel to get people from A to B each week.  Sadly the charity has failed to look at the bigger picture and could potentially miss out on funding. It has focused on an outputs of its work rather than the outcomes and what it could achieve if it raises the money.   If your charity is in a similar situation and snuggles to talk about impact and outcomes think about:   1. What would happen to beneficiaries if they weren't able to use your service?   2. Why do people need your service, what situations are they in?   3. Do you have any case studies to highlight the difference you are making?   4. What impact does your work have on those that volunteer? Why do they volunteer?    Going back to the example of the Dial a Ride service, what it failed to realise was the positive difference it was having on the lives of not only the people that used the service but the volunteer drivers too! Many of the drivers were retired and chose to volunteer regular time each week to give them something constructive to do, a purpose. Something to get up for in the mornings. They enjoyed the camaraderie between one another and the contact they had with the local community. They felt as though they were doing their bit to give something back.   Furthermore the people that were using the service often called it a 'life line' and without it they said their lives would be very different. Many users suffered from rural isolation and so often felt trapped in their own homes, due to old age and disability.    When you next come to fundraise for your cause, whether it's online or through a grant application, use the questions above to help tell your story. Include as much detail as possible to make sure your voice is heard and let people know the great work that you are doing every day.    For inspiration check out these great fundraising pages on our site: Park in the Past  The Josephine and Jack Project Street Talk     Good luck with your fundraising!     Found this blog post useful? You may also like:    Wise Words from Alistair Sill: Local Hero Champion 2016                 7 digital tactics for small charities in volatile times   Image courtesy of 
    Mar 13, 2017 1938